10,394 reputation
32859
bio website
location
age
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen 2 hours ago

Nov
18
comment Neural nets as universal approximators
@Sunny88: sorry, my error. Just played around with polynomial kernel nets (which seem to be next generation ANNs) and forgot about simple sigmoid :D However, the idea stays the same: neither with polynomial, nor with sigmoid activation function you cannot represent this formula exactly, and simple approximation will hardly fit your needs of predicting exact number.
Nov
16
comment How to call function from hashmap in Scala
@AndreasScheinert: Seba K was confused with an error. I explained why he gets it - pointer to Option. If I was new to Scala and saw such unusual behavior (get returning not the value, but some wrapper), my next question would be "what is this wrapper and why they put it there". You may agree or disagree with me, but 1) the question is answered; 2) answer is correct. All additional infos may be useful or useless for the author, but conditions of a good answer on SO rules are met.
Nov
16
comment How to call function from hashmap in Scala
@AndreasScheinert: the link I provided is not just about Option class, but about safe programming overall and in particular about why they use it in HashMap. So nope, I don't think that your link is more useful in this concrete case than the original.
Nov
14
comment Lisp List Printing
@pirezas: any form (function, macro, variable, expression) in Lisp always returns some value. You can't avoid printing returned value in REPL. However, you can change (format t ...) to (format nil ...) and thus return string instead of printing string and returning nil.
Nov
10
comment Lisp List Printing
I believe you try this code in REPL. NIL here is not the part of printing, but just returned value, so don't worry about it.
Nov
10
comment Lisp List Printing
@pirezas: in this case I definitely recommend you structuring you function into several small functions: you need unusual condition statements anyway, and it is much simpler and more readable to do them in Lisp code, not in format internal language. Also see my updated answer. And BTW, consider using @ and the name of the person you reply to, so this person could get notification about your response.
Nov
10
comment Lisp List Printing
@pirezas: so you don't need any formatting, spaces, etc., but just to print each next row at new line?
Nov
10
comment Lisp List Printing
Huh, why downvoting?
Nov
9
comment Should I use Lucene just for Highlighting?
That's why I said that most probably you need Lucene - FORMSOF is very similar to stemming in Lucene, but FORMSOF doesn't provide you with highlighting, and Lucene does.
Nov
6
comment How do I import a Java package in Scala?
I'm not sure Scala allows import statement inside of object, try moving it at the top of a file (after package ..., but before object ...)
Oct
29
comment How to classify a set of samples via a continuous feature?
@stakx: in general, such a question may have a purely algorithmic solution (some data structure or some well-known algorithm), so actually it relate to programming. However, it also relates to math and statistics, so if nobody provides good answer I also suggest to try on the CrossValidated. But first let's look at problem background and possible algorithmic solutions.
Oct
29
comment How to classify a set of samples via a continuous feature?
I believe you should formulate requirements more precisely - "too little", "too much", "smooth enough", etc. aren't good conditions for am algorithm. Can you provide us with a background, what this task is part of?
Oct
26
comment printing values returned from scala function
@Omnipresent: every method returns something, but without = the return type is always Unit, i.e. (). Keep in mind, that Scala is designed to be functional language, and in functional programming almost each construction returns value, even such things as if: val x = if b { ifVal } { elseVal }.
Oct
25
comment Is there a PriorityQueue implementation with fixed capacity and custom comparator?
@Robert Muir: huh, you are right again! I imagined another heap implementation (tree-like) and haven't even thought it is easy to get least element, thus I was sure head is top element and missed this point in javadocs. Now I see it. Thanks again!
Oct
25
comment Is there a PriorityQueue implementation with fixed capacity and custom comparator?
@Robert Muir: poll() removes head of the queue, i.e. greatest element, not the least.
Oct
25
comment Is there a PriorityQueue implementation with fixed capacity and custom comparator?
Unfortunately, standard PriorityQueue doesn't provide easy (and fast) way to remove least element (which with respect to heap structure is quite understandable). So I decided to implement fixed size priority queue on top of TreeSet. Thanks anyway.
Oct
25
comment Is there a PriorityQueue implementation with fixed capacity and custom comparator?
Huh, I didn't noticed, thanks! Upvote, but since it requires additional library, I believe another implementation based on standard API is more preferable (see my update).
Oct
18
comment weka - how to print incorrectly classified instances
I understand, "Weka output" is from Weka Explorer? If so, these results are for cross-validation, and you most probably make tests in some other way. Before diving into code, can you make a simple test - add else clause to your if and count how many instances are actually classified correctly (pred == actual)?
Oct
18
comment How do I effectively manage a Clojure code base?
In addition I would suggest testing every new or modified function in REPL - this is quick and very easy way to find most of possible errors.
Oct
13
comment Interview challenge: Find the different elements in two arrays
@jb.: if they are arrays they are already in the memory, so quick sort will be ok. If they are on the disk, they are files and completely different algorithm is needed. Note, that quick sort is not guaranteed to be O(n*log n), but none of general purpose algorithms that I know are.