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Mar
8
comment GHC evaluation strategy
Yeah, the more I think about it, the more it seems like a Map is the one great example where laziness would actually not be a bad thing. Can't see why they made it spine-strict.
Mar
8
comment GHC evaluation strategy
This is what I missed. I went through the sources for mapWithKey before posting the question, but didn't pay attention to the data Map declaration. Thanks! Follow up question: is there a reason why such strictness is considered a good thing? Is there a post somewhere on GHC mailing list where they had a discussion about this?
Mar
7
comment GHC evaluation strategy
@JohnL: No, this doesn't make sense, specially when it comes to Data.Map.map. That function requires no rebalancing: it takes a balanced tree and produces another one with identical structure.
Mar
7
comment GHC evaluation strategy
Why does it require spine-strict-ness? Like I said in my question, I was really expecting it to just evaluate that one path from root to leaf. That should be doable in O(log n), right?
Nov
6
comment List bash “bind -x” bindings
Huh! So, I guess I'll just hang tight then :-P Do you know their release schedule/workaround for 4.2?
Nov
5
comment List bash “bind -x” bindings
I don't know which version of bash you are using, but for me bind -X returns invalid option. Indeed, help bind does not list -X for me. On my machine, bash --version produces version 4.2.45(1)-release (x86_64-pc-linux-gnu)
Mar
9
comment Find longest path between set of nodes in a tree
This. To elaborate, the algorithm mentioned here finds the longest simple path in any tree. So in your case, you just have to clip off any part of the tree that is 'below' your given k nodes. So first start with your tree, keep removing leaves not in the set ai. At this point, all your leaves are in the set given. After this, run the 3 steps above.
Mar
9
comment String vector still reachable
Right. exit bypasses destructor calls, while many classes rely heavily on destructors being actually called. In any case, if you have many other variables in your program in caller functions that you cannot put braces around, one hack is to simply throw an error and never catch it. But it is a hack, more recommended to provide the user with some indication of what went wrong.
Feb
18
comment How to add results to an object with long list of fields?
A technology that solves exactly the problem OP is trying to solve.
Feb
15
comment Linking separate projects in GHC
@luqui: I think cabal-dev solved all my problems. I know I was complaining about separate compilation, but I guess what I was really worried about was being unable to have multiple development versions of ProjectA while have ProjectB depend only on the stable versions.
Feb
15
comment Linking separate projects in GHC
Thanks, I will check out shake, but I don't really need a make replacement. In fact, I am quite a happy user of make right now. The problem is that GHC seems to have this strange way of searching for .o and .hi files that doesn't seem to be sufficiently customizable. In other words, if I add -outputdir bin ... it will look for precompiled files in bin, and I can't find a way to change that to ProjectA/bin
Feb
15
comment Linking separate projects in GHC
@MathematicalOrchid,: Yes, it was the same GHC version
Feb
15
comment Linking separate projects in GHC
@luqui: thanks for the link. I will check it out.
Feb
15
comment Linking separate projects in GHC
And as for Cabal, that works, but I don't want to drop this in my ~/.cabal folder when I will only be using this for 2-3 Projects. I don't want this to be in my search path for every project ever.
Feb
15
comment Linking separate projects in GHC
I already tried -i before posting this. Does everything I want, except it also recompiles everything in ProjectA. I was hoping to find an analogue for 'gcc x.o y.o'.
Oct
31
comment Why is there “data” and “newtype” in Haskell?
Love your answer! Follow-up: when would I actually want laziness on a data type with a single field? In what real-life situation is that useful?
Aug
24
comment Randomly permuting large lists (over 100 million elements)
Ah, so we are back to O(n log n). Ok, thanks. Can we avoid that, though? Just curious
Aug
24
comment How to model core business logic and specializations for multiple applications?
Your question sounds a little vague to me. Could you provide a small concrete examples? The question I would be interested in is along the lines of "what kind of changes to the code do I forsee in the near future, and what kind of design reduces the maintenance pain"
Aug
24
comment Randomly permuting large lists (over 100 million elements)
Thanks. But doesn't this simply change the problem into one of generating integer permutations? If I understood it right, your packages (mersenne-random, vector-random etc.) do not export any method for producing vectors with non-duplicate elements. Since I am relatively new to haskell, I would also like to know how the GHC runtime is using up stack space in the code I pasted, so that I do not make the same mistakes again
Apr
11
comment Functional programming in C++11, F# style
Not quite true. Most popular C++ compilers today will properly handle tail-recursion, although may require you to specify extra optimization flags like '-O2'.