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Over the years I mostly programmed in C++ on POSIX systems, namely linux. But then, quite suddenly I became allergic to C++, to its useless bloat, crude syntax and its tendency to send apples three times around the earth just to be delivered to your neighbor.

I now mostly program in C, C99 to be precise, starting with C11, and occasionally in perl when I just need to do some scripting.

A first result of that is P99 a set of preprocessor macros for C99. People will say that P99 is a useless bloat, has crude syntax and has tendency to send apples once around the earth just to be delivered to your neighbor. But if it is already two orbits that we gain, it is worth it, isn't it?

As an additional feature, on some platforms P99 now also emulates a lot of C11, atomics, threads, type generics, be surprised!


2d
comment How to free a two dimensional array using malloc
This is not a 2D array. Try to allocate a real one. char (*array)[40] = malloc(sizeof(char[6][40]));
Aug
11
comment Unsure if structure has been initialised
I think the first thing you'd have to learn is to ask good questions :) SO is no a site for code review but for concrete technical questions. Please boil your code down to something readable and think of what you really wanting to ask.
Aug
11
comment Aliasing in ANSI C : Is a = (double *) (&a) allowed
I don't see the connection between the first and second part of the question. Why do you think that vectorizing would do some implicit cast from doulble* to double**?
Aug
10
revised C++ game design
removing C tag, C is not C++
Aug
5
comment Macros for 3D loops in C
@Lundin, right, so I deleted the word "modern", see my edit :)
Aug
5
revised Macros for 3D loops in C
deleted 7 characters in body
Aug
5
answered Macros for 3D loops in C
Aug
2
comment Why does GCC treat two similar loops differently?
it should be j == UINTMAX, no minus one in there.
Aug
2
comment Why does GCC treat two similar loops differently?
Just a minor correction, -1U is equal to UINT_MAX and not one smaller.
Jul
31
revised C++ operator[] overloading with template accessing boost::variant
this is definitively not C but C++
Jul
30
comment Is it safe to cast a heap allocated pointer to a pointer to a VLA?
@epicbrew, any compiler that also implements C99 is save for use with VLA. They were made optional in the hope to get those compilers that aren't yet C99 to modern C. Probably just wishful thinking.
Jul
30
comment Segmentation Fault when assigning value to an element of array
Did you really look up the manual page for fprintf before asking here?
Jul
29
answered Access of static variable from one file to another file
Jul
25
comment how sig_atomic_t actually works
@Satchit, C prior of C11 didn't have even a model of threads, so the type sig_atomic_t of the C standard made no assumption at all if this could be suited for multithreading. And yes, generally it is not suited for inter-thread communication, don't use it for that purpose. volatile has not much to do with thread safeness, either. As I said, C11 that introduces threads also introduces proper atomic datatypes.
Jul
24
revised how sig_atomic_t actually works
added 503 characters in body
Jul
24
comment how sig_atomic_t actually works
@Satchit, they are not treated differently. Platforms that use plain int for this give you a guarantee that volatile int is sufficient for signal handlers. This is normally nothing you as a user should or could know, but the compiler implementor has to look that up and choose the correct base type for this. And again sig_atomic_t is not an atomic type.
Jul
24
comment how sig_atomic_t actually works
How is that? I don't think that I am the one who is confusing things. I simply reminded you of a fact from the C standard, that sig_atomic_t is not an atomic data type. It just gives certain guarantees for signal handlers. Please see my answer.
Jul
24
answered how sig_atomic_t actually works
Jul
24
comment how sig_atomic_t actually works
Not relevant. Even if sig_atomic_t has atomic in its name, it is not an atomic data type.
Jul
23
comment _Pragma and macro substitution
@DrewMcGowen, this has a very precise meaning which is provided in 7.1.3. Paragraph 2 says what you are not supposed to do with it: If the program declares or defines an identifier in a context in which it is reserved (other than as allowed by 7.1.4), or defines a reserved identifier as a macro name, the behavior is undefined.