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2d
comment Is it undefined in C11 to modify the result of a function call, or access it after the next sequence point?
I think on SO there is no major problem in answering your own question. I just have put it in a comment, because I'll don't have time today to make it a decent answer. So please go ahead.
2d
comment Is it undefined in C11 to modify the result of a function call, or access it after the next sequence point?
In C11 there is the definition of temporary lifetime in 6.2.4 p8 that is relevant, here.
Jun
28
comment If char c = 0x80, why does printf(“%d\n”, c << 1) output -256?
@B.Nadolson, never mind for the vote. Yes, this is a common error. But in many cases the error is in fact in the choice of the type, as in this example.
Jun
27
comment If char c = 0x80, why does printf(“%d\n”, c << 1) output -256?
@B.Nadolson, I don't think that it is misleading. The constant 0x80 is of type int and has value 128. This type and value on the RHS is determined first, and then that type and value is converted to fit the type on the LHS. Trying to initialize a possibly signed variable with a value that doesn't fit the type is a semantic error.
Jun
26
comment Cannot understand what “error: initializer element is not constant” means
No, then it is not key_type_user. You are not supposed to have a function call in file scope. This is only allowed inside functions.
Jun
26
comment I am having trouble compiling and running my C program. What are the commands?
What does this question have to do with emacs?
Jun
26
comment Warn if another typedef'd name of a type is used in an argument list
If you would have such a strong typing, your initialization with int constants would be illegal, too.
Jun
25
comment How to pass a sequential counter by reference to pthread start routine?
Casting a function pointer is a bad idea. Calling a function not according to its prototype is an error that leads to undefined behavior, pointers may have different representation and calling conventions can be different according to the argument type. Generally casts are evil, you pretend to know better than the compiler. Here you'd just have to declare printnum with the correct signature and then have int* num = arg to convert (not cast) the argument to the type that you are expecting.
Jun
25
comment How to extract the source filename without path and suffix at compile time?
What I meant is that you could just do gcc -O3 -o ${file} -DFILE_BASE="\"${file}\"" "${file}.c" directly without passing your source through sed and complicated stuff like that.
Jun
25
comment How to extract the source filename without path and suffix at compile time?
This doesn't look very helpful. If you have to place the string of interest into the source, anyhow, you can just as well use it directly to initialize the variable.
Jun
24
comment What is the correct way to implement error propagation in C?
setjmp/longjmp are plain C, so there is no need to restrict that to POSIX systems.
Jun
24
comment Cannot understand what “error: initializer element is not constant” means
For automatic variables, such dynamic initialization is allowed.
Jun
23
comment Forcing C99 in CMake (to use 'for' loop initial declaration)
@chux, this only talks about C library support, not about the core language or the preprocessor.
Jun
23
comment What is this C syntax #define GET_UINT32_BE(n,b,i)?
This would be even much better as an expression that just returns the computed value.
Jun
23
comment Macro whitespace
@user3629249, yes for the #define there should be no space before the (). Otherwise it could not distinguish the definition of a functional macro from one that just has () in the expansion. For the macro invocation all of that is irrelevant.
Jun
23
comment Is post-increment operator guaranteed to run instantly?
Even if the standard leaves the latitude to the implementation to do the evaluation in any order, it could impose that between each of these would be placed a sequence point. The standard calls this indeterminately sequenced. This holds e.g for initialization expressions in an initializer list.
Jun
23
comment Is post-increment operator guaranteed to run instantly?
No it is not just simplified, it is wrong. The idea that one would happen after the other ("sometime later") gives a false impression that the store happens "after" the increment itself. Many processors have an instruction for this kind of operation, so they "happen" at exactly the same time. And then your discussion about the two different i++ is also misleading. The code is an error because of the lack of sequence points, so the compiler could do anything that pleases, here. (BTW, the downvote is not mine.)
Jun
23
comment Is post-increment operator guaranteed to run instantly?
Still not much better, it could be unspecific but still sequenced one way or the other.
Jun
23
comment Is post-increment operator guaranteed to run instantly?
No, wrong answer. There is no "sometime later", here. The compiler is even allowed to evaluate the two expressions simultaneously in parallel if the hardware permits it.
Jun
23
comment Is post-increment operator guaranteed to run instantly?
Your explanation has nothing to do with the fact that this is undefined.