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18h
comment What is the use of a statement with no effect in C++?
In addition to the comment about just not naming the parameter, you can also name it in the declaration but not name it in the definition. The names (or lack of names) don't need to match.
18h
comment why does boost::any forbid the forwarding of const&&?
tangent: aren't you missing a bunch of typenames in there?
21h
accepted C++11 Lock free update 2 variables atomically
21h
accepted Uniform initialization of an atomic struct?
1d
revised Uniform initialization of an atomic struct?
added 108 characters in body
1d
comment Uniform initialization of an atomic struct?
@vsoftco Ya, that's the issue I'm having... using clang. Is there a workaround?
1d
revised Uniform initialization of an atomic struct?
added 18 characters in body; edited title
1d
revised Uniform initialization of an atomic struct?
edited title
1d
asked Uniform initialization of an atomic struct?
Jul
18
comment C++11 Lock free update 2 variables atomically
Yes oldX could definitely change during the loop because of a different thread. That's kind of the whole point of having the compare_exchange and the local cached x at all. In fact all CAS loops are basically set up with this compare with a cached version and then only perform the swap if the cached variable still equals the atomic value. Otherwise, I would've just written if(f(newX) && newX < atomicX){ atomicX = newX; atomixY = newY; } right? The thread function examples up there are the only things modifying atomicX - just pretend that function is running as 15 threads.
Jul
18
comment C++11 Lock free update 2 variables atomically
@antiduh To answer your first question, think of y as an id. I do need to find the minimum x when some criteria is met, and I need to know both what the minimum is, and which id it corresponds to. I can't calculate it afterwards.
Jul
18
comment C++11 Lock free update 2 variables atomically
I know I'm comparing to the local cache of x, but that's intentional. compare_exchange_strong will update x if it returns false, and it will only swap is x == atomicX
Jul
18
comment C++11 Lock free update 2 variables atomically
Uhh, well as the code in the question shows, I do need to change x and y atomically, but only when a new x is less than atomicX.
Jul
18
revised C++11 Lock free update 2 variables atomically
added 10 characters in body
Jul
18
comment C++11 Lock free update 2 variables atomically
@antiduh compare_exchange_strong will update x when it returns false. So on the first iteration of that loop, you're right, it's true && ..., but on subsequent iterations the first condition has meaning. I think I'm doing it correctly for that loop, but correct me if I'm still wrong
Jul
18
comment C++11 Lock free update 2 variables atomically
But if I did the compare_exchange_strong on an a pointer I'm just comparing pointers, when I want to compare x.
Jul
18
comment C++11 Lock free update 2 variables atomically
@Casey I actually need a uint64_t and a uint32_t, minimally.
Jul
18
comment C++11 Lock free update 2 variables atomically
@dyp I don't need a real guarantee, just a strong "it should be lock free on anything modern"
Jul
18
comment C++11 Lock free update 2 variables atomically
@dyp I ruled it out because I assumed it wouldn't be lock free. This is ultimately going on multiple platforms and I would rather have something I could reasonably assume will be lock free on all platforms (like atomic<int>)
Jul
18
revised C++11 Lock free update 2 variables atomically
added 18 characters in body; edited title