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Jul
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
25
comment Why the Haskell sequence function can't be lazy or why recursive monadic functions can't be lazy
@DamianNadales it has to do with the semantics of how >>= is implemented. For Identity, m >>= k = k (runIdentity m). runIdentity just unpacks the newtype wrapper. There's nothing in the definition that requires m be evaluated, which means this >>= is non-strict.
Jul
24
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
18
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May
18
awarded  Guru
Mar
8
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Mar
5
comment Is my concurrency monad a valid instance of MonadThrow?
@samboosalis: an excellent question, unfortunately I have no idea what I was thinking when I wrote this answer. I suspect that it was a very short voice of frustration as to Haskell's current model of exceptions, which is both more difficult to reason about and less powerful than I would like. For example, there doesn't seem to be a way to express resumable exceptions in the model. I do seem to recall thinking that the law is overly restrictive even for the given exception model, but after some reflection I don't believe that's true.
Mar
5
comment Is there ever a good reason to use unsafePerformIO?
@imz--IvanZakharyaschev: unfortunately there are ways to smuggle the pointer outside of alloca, for example the function could write it to an IORef. This is always a bad idea though, so I don't typically consider such nefarious practices. The main advantage of alloca is that the memory will be automatically freed, plus it's convenient to use. For your use case of creating a String, unsafePerformIO should be safe provided that the call into C is otherwise pure.
Feb
20
comment Is there ever a good reason to use unsafePerformIO?
@imz--IvanZakharyaschev you're correct, the unsafePerformIO is implicitly added due to the type signature of p_sin (not sure if GHC still allows that). Your approach is ok, although it isn't thread-safe if multiple threads are using the same pointer. You could stuff that action into an alloca though, like unsafePerformIO $ alloca ..., which should be completely safe.
Feb
19
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Jan
30
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
23
comment What's the proper way to manage allocated memory in the foreign language?
If the string isn't too large (and doesn't mutate), you might be better off copying it so that one copy is owned by the foreign side and the other copy is owned by the Haskell runtime. Otherwise, you may want to think of the foreign side handing ownership of the string to Haskell, i.e. the foreign side doesn't retain any references to the memory, and if it needs to do anything it calls back into Haskell to do so.
Dec
30
comment Does a function in Haskell always evaluate its return value?
@augustss: foo x y = x is strict in x and (probably) wouldn't return a thunk even at -O0, but that's not true in general. As you state, it's necessary to look at how the return value is demanded.
Dec
29
comment Does a function in Haskell always evaluate its return value?
@user2666425: generally a function returns its result as a thunk (ignoring certain optimization passes). The caller of the function may force evaluation of that result in the process of computing its own return value. Evaluation generally means evaluation to WHNF. Another really great introduction to this is blog.ezyang.com/2011/04/the-haskell-heap
Dec
29
comment Is there any safe way to generate a lazy list in IO?
@bheklilr: that won't work, because >>= is strict for IO. To lazily construct a lazy list in IO, unsafeInterleaveIO is essentially the only way. In general, programmers prefer to seek other solutions (e.g. using ST instead of IO, returning a new IO action, etc), but sometimes there's nothing wrong with unsafeInterleaveIO.
Dec
29
comment Does a function in Haskell always evaluate its return value?
Have you seen stackoverflow.com/questions/6872898/… ?
Dec
28
comment Deriving functor instance, not on last type argument
Unfortunately this isn't as helpful as it appears. Type synonyms can't be partially applied, so you'd never be able to use Expr ann def anywhere (except possibly with the LiberalTypeSynonyms extension, but there are still limits). One could use a newtype, but that still doesn't solve the OP's primary issue, which is wanting to get an fmap-like function without having to write it manually.
Dec
28
answered Convert from type `T a` to `T b` without boilerplate
Dec
28
answered Deriving functor instance, not on last type argument
Dec
28
comment how can I decently add an “undo” functionality to State monads?
I'd probably use a stack also, but if I wanted to try something clever I might look into the approach I outlined at stackoverflow.com/questions/5193876/…