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comment Get first item matching a criteria using foldr
Surprised nobody's mentioned the First monoid. Combine that with the default definition of foldMap to get a working implementation.
Aug
29
comment implementing curry function
Yet another way to do this composition is my_curry origFunc = (origFunc.) . combine.
Aug
29
answered Huge memory consumption for simple multithreaded Haskell
Aug
28
comment Huge memory consumption for simple multithreaded Haskell
@3noch: it's not just TMQueue, it's a pretty common problem with several Haskell data structures, lists as well. Not every data structure scales well in all situations, you should see stackoverflow.com/questions/3254758/… for more information.
Aug
28
comment Huge memory consumption for simple multithreaded Haskell
@3noch well, unagi-chan is several orders of magnitude faster than MVar-like chans. Also this isn't a good test of parallelism because it's IO-bound and the only significant CPU load is from the channel operations. If your actual program involves more significant processing in the pipeline, that will dominate and unagi's basic speed advantage won't contribute as much to the final results.
Aug
28
comment Huge memory consumption for simple multithreaded Haskell
Incidentally, the basic problem is that the producer far outstrips the consumer, so there's a big backlog of data to process. I think that, because unagi-chan uses a more memory-efficient representation, it ends up using less memory even though it suffers from the same problem. If you can't allow your producer to block, then you need to be prepared for possible spikes in memory usage whenever the consumer lags. It's also possible to force the consumer to disconnect and re-sync, but that can result in lost items.
Aug
28
comment Huge memory consumption for simple multithreaded Haskell
Hmm, it does seem to help memory usage a lot. It's still pretty inefficient memory-wise though.
Aug
28
comment Huge memory consumption for simple multithreaded Haskell
@3noch my initial thought is that unagi-chan wouldn't make much difference in this situation, I'd be interested to know if it significantly improves memory usage.
Aug
25
comment Timeouts with ghc 7.8.3
@bheklilr: regardless, I think not exporting the TimerManager type was a mistake. There's no way having access to the type constructor would allow anyone to misuse the implementation.
Aug
24
comment Lazy evaluation and nested thunks eating up memory
@JuanLuisSoldi sorry I'm not being clear. When I said that the function is applied, I mean that ghc does something like let x' = id x in st x', with x' being the thunk passed into the next stage. (Function application is not the same as reducing the resultant value to WHNF). I'm not sure how ghc decides what doesn't need to be wrapped, this part happens in the STG phase of the pipeline which I'm not as familiar with. The full details are probably in research.microsoft.com/apps/pubs/default.aspx?id=67083
Aug
24
comment Implementing Applicative's (<*>) for Monad
There are quite a few questions on SO about desugaring do-notation that might help you. I think my answer (stackoverflow.com/questions/7229518/…) is good obviously, but there are others too.
Aug
24
comment Lazy evaluation and nested thunks eating up memory
@JuanLuisSoldi in ghc, thunks are a property of values; (almost) any value can either be evaluated or unevaluated (a thunk). In the second example, ghc would apply id x (it's this act of function application that creates the new value/thunk) and pass that value into the recursive call. It sounds like your compiler does something else, and I don't think I understand it well enough to make any suggestions. But your idea of deciding whether to create a new thunk or not based upon the term structure could work.
Aug
21
comment Most efficient or idiomatic way to test singleton list contents in Haskell?
I suspect the OP was doing the same thing I was, and when saying "comparing two singleton lists" only consider the True case (the perf concerns apply to both cases WLOG).
Aug
21
comment Most efficient or idiomatic way to test singleton list contents in Haskell?
Ah, I think I understand where I'm not being clear. I'm saying that in comparing primeFactorsOf n == [n], the RHS has an extra indirection ([n] === n:[] === cons n [], which is less efficient than head (primeFactorsOf n) == n (as the OP suggests), because in the latter case the RHS has one less indirection and only the LHS needs to be deconstructed. It's probably not a significant concern except in a really tight loop though. And I would expect that GHC could remove it for you in some cases.
Aug
21
comment Most efficient or idiomatic way to test singleton list contents in Haskell?
yes, but if you're comparing two lists, you first have to check if the outer constructor is [] or :. Which is it for [n]? Better not be [], which only leaves cons.
Aug
21
revised Most efficient or idiomatic way to test singleton list contents in Haskell?
added 101 characters in body
Aug
21
comment Most efficient or idiomatic way to test singleton list contents in Haskell?
how exactly does the second variant not compare two singleton lists? Looks to me like that's exactly what happens. The compiler may optimize it out, but it might not (it didn't when I checked, but YMMV depending on context).
Aug
21
comment Most efficient or idiomatic way to test singleton list contents in Haskell?
@TheodoreLiefGannon you're exactly correct, it's a pattern match and a guard. If either fails, the case falls through to the next statement, which is a wildcard so it will always match.