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Jun
29
comment Iteratee I/O: need to know file size beforehand
@edwardw: doing take len in this manner is exactly equivalent to doing Data.ByteString.readFile. There's really no point to using an iteratee at all anymore.
Jun
28
comment fixed length circular buffer in haskell
Another nice feature with Data.Vector is that it's relatively simple to pass Data.Vector.Storable arrays to a C library.
Jun
28
comment fixed length circular buffer in haskell
@Dan Burton: oddly enough, I tested this not long ago. Using Data.Sequence was generally the best performing option, and (very surprisingly) often outperformed an unboxed mutable array. Even in pathological cases (lots of reads from the middle of the sequence), performance wasn't that much worse than the mutable buffer. I was so surprised by this result I'm still not sure that I believe it, but I don't think I made any mistakes in my testing.
Jun
28
comment Building with runtime flags using cabal and ghc
@Viktor Dahl: I think the quotes are causing the problem. Try either using single quotes, or multiple -with-rtsopts lines. If that solves it, it's probably a ghc bug (or documentation error).
Jun
28
revised Building with runtime flags using cabal and ghc
added 108 characters in body
Jun
28
answered Building with runtime flags using cabal and ghc
Jun
28
comment Haskell: can Lazy Evaluation help to stop a voting earlier?
@sclv: I read the "parallel or not" as referring to the 10 different functions, not the solution. I agree this is a reasonable serial solution.
Jun
27
comment Haskell: can Lazy Evaluation help to stop a voting earlier?
@sclv - yes, that's what I meant. However, the question specifically asks for a parallel answer. This doesn't work at all then.
Jun
27
comment Haskell: can Lazy Evaluation help to stop a voting earlier?
@sclv: what if '5' finishes evaluation before 4? This takes the first 'n' elements from your list, not the first 'n' elements to finish.
Jun
27
comment Bentley-Ottmann Algorithm in Haskell?
@n.m. - true, but that's how Data.Map.Map is implemented anyway, as I understand it. That's why map keys have an Ord constraint. Of course you may be able to find a more efficient implementation for any given purpose, plus then you wouldn't need to perform a split+rebalance (presuming Data.Map does so), which is probably costly.
Jun
27
comment Bentley-Ottmann Algorithm in Haskell?
Most haskell maps (e.g. Data.Map, unordered-containers) don't have a function to return neighbors of a given element, but you can use split and then minView or maxView as needed.
Jun
26
comment SPOJ Problem Flibonakki time limit exceed
I don't think the problem is with Haskell but with ghc-6.10, which is the version used by SPOJ. I can't replicate a stack overflow with ghc-6.12.3, which is the oldest Haskell I have available, but it is considerably slower than ghc-7. You can try adding bang patterns to the list patterns in matmul, which is probably where the thunk is building up.
Jun
25
awarded  haskell
Jun
24
comment help on writing “the colist Monad” (Exercise from an Idioms intro paper)
@camccann: you're quite right, the paper was useless for this purpose (although otherwise a good read!). However I did notice that I misread the exercise and was thinking of a regular list monad, not the colist monad. That cleared it up nicely.
Jun
24
comment help on writing “the colist Monad” (Exercise from an Idioms intro paper)
@camccan: I was afraid of that. I'll just read the paper and hope that fills in the details.
Jun
24
comment What is the -i option while compiling hs file using GHC and how to do same in GHCi?
You can also specify it directly as an argument, ghci -i/d/haskell/src /d/haskell/src/Module.hs If you're only loading one module you don't even need the -i, but I usually have a lot of sub-modules to pull in which ghci won't find otherwise.
Jun
24
comment help on writing “the colist Monad” (Exercise from an Idioms intro paper)
@camccann: I'm not clear on one point. If the "coinductive interpretation" refers to infinite lists (I agree this is likely), then wouldn't repeat and zapp actually form a monad which is unsuited to said coinductive interpretation? That's the case for ZipList, which doesn't have a valid monad instance. Anyway, I suspect the authors chose this example to make the point that applicative functors are useful in part because they're more general than monads (shame on me, I haven't read the paper yet).
Jun
24
answered What is the -i option while compiling hs file using GHC and how to do same in GHCi?
Jun
23
comment Performance analysis of a fold using map and ByteString keys
Not a solution, but foldl' over an accumulating map is a waste. Just use a regular foldl.
Jun
22
awarded  Civic Duty