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Apr
16
comment Feed an intermediate digest to a sha-1 function?
You're on the right track. Some background: Sha1 uses the Merkle–Damgård construction and processes the input in blocks of 512bits. If possible, I would align the separate parts to these block boundaries so you do not have to transmit partial blocks. Note that the library buffers more data than necessary for Sha1, so you should take care not to transmit more than the partial block (at most 63bytes).
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Apr
4
answered Advantages of Hash Verification of Parameters and Content over TLS
Mar
28
comment Best Practices: Salting & peppering passwords?
Now, as I've said above, encrypting hashed passwords is especially forgiving. But if it wasn't for bcrypts 72 bytes limit, I would gladly suggest prepending pepper to the password as the least complex (and thus more secure) and theoretically sound solution. And yes, I know you probably do not agree that preventing key rollover is worth the lessened complexity. I for one, are more afraid of all the ways the encryption code can go wrong than of the threat of a disclosed pepper.
Mar
28
comment Best Practices: Salting & peppering passwords?
Re why not just use encryption: Because with encryption people are as likely to roll their own custom schemes (not in the sense of inventing their own cipher, but in the sense of plugging together components they know nothing about). While we would like to think encryption should be just as easy as password hashing, the dire reality is that most libraries are horrible. I've already alluded to PHP's mcrypt, but even the Java documentation is outright dangerous: Cipher.getInstance("DES/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
Mar
28
comment Best Practices: Salting & peppering passwords?
Oh, silly me, I recognized that you call bcrypt a hash function for the purpose of this article in the very next bullet point, but didn't realize its use there. It's unfortunate that we call bcrypt a "password hash function" while it bears next to no resemblance to a cryptographic hash function (no arbitrary input values, no arbitrary input length). Again (like in "Working Against Design"), it's probably better to leave the paragraph like it is because many readers are quite likely to confuse bcrypt with a secure hash function. And with the added link the rest knows what you are talking about.
Mar
28
comment Best Practices: Salting & peppering passwords?
I do much like your argument, though, that encryption is better for the job, because it allows easier management and is a tool that was simply made for the task of keeping data confidential. Also, for the case of password hashing, you have to try really hard to apply the encryption primitive wrongly. Even ECB mode would be fine. Regarding your complexity argument: I would still argue that statically prepending pepper to the password in e.g. a PHP 5.5 password_hash has much less complexity than using a library like mcrypt to encrypt the password afterwards.
Mar
28
comment Best Practices: Salting & peppering passwords?
Suhosin's hash_function only had one input and Suhosin referred to it as a secure hash function, which implies something like Sha256. And for secure hash function onewayness is an explicit design goal. You won't get a formal reduction proof, but it is absurd to believe that $password |-> hash_function($salt.hash_function($pepper.$password)) would be any less oneway than password |-> hash_function($salt.$password). And, referring to authority, Cryptography Engineering advises the use of Sha256(Sha256(m)) instead of a single application to counter the length extension property.
Mar
28
comment Best Practices: Salting & peppering passwords?
"""We know from past experience that "just feeding" one hash result into another hash function can decrease the overall security.""" - Tell me just one real world attack that is remotely relevant to the case described by Suhosin. Of course, doing stuff like Sha256(MD5(m)) basically nulls its collision resistance, but for password hashing even that would not be a problem. Regarding "Working Against Design": While it might be good to refer to bcrypt and scrypt, because that is what people are likely using, you ignore the original question.
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Feb
21
revised How to choose an AES encryption mode (CBC ECB CTR OCB CFB)?
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Jan
17
comment How to choose an AES encryption mode (CBC ECB CTR OCB CFB)?
Otherwise I would advise you to seek opinionated books and guides that not only tell you what is there, but also advises you which combinations to use. For that reason I like to recommend Cryptography Engineering, because it does a better job at that than most low level introductions.
Jan
17
comment How to choose an AES encryption mode (CBC ECB CTR OCB CFB)?
I've heard good things about the matasano crypto challenges as an introduction to breaking crypto. Matthew Green has good blog posts of the more complex attacks like BEAST. Troy Hunt advocates hacking yourself first. @jordanpg