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Apr
20
comment Is a class with deleted copy-constructor trivially copyable?
@iheanyi: you can read this : blog.llvm.org/2011/05/what-every-c-programmer-should-know.html for a flavor of what "undefined behavior" means.
Apr
20
comment Is a class with deleted copy-constructor trivially copyable?
@iheanyi: "valid" in this case means "trivially copyable" (this is the whole point of the question). Also the compiler is not required to issue a diagnostic. All these rules are meant to give a framework for various optimizations to occur while still being able to rely on something. The way memcpy is implemented or optimized within your program (the compiler can reorder a lot of things and treat memcpy specially for instance) must respect the standard, but that's all. Also your program can work in one version of a compiler and break later as the compiler evolves.
Apr
20
comment Is a class with deleted copy-constructor trivially copyable?
@iheanyi: When the standard does not explicitly define the behavior of something (like memcpying non trivially-copyable objects), the compiler is free to do whatever it wants, including optimizing away the call or crashing the program, or doing something which looks like what you would expect, but crashes the program later (or not). This can depend on compiler flags, optimization settings, etc. So this is important to understand what is and is not allowed as a programmer.
Apr
15
comment Logging within a destructor
It depends on how you are going to set up your logging. Are you using standard IO (either cstdio or iostream) ? Are you using a framework ? Something more elaborated ? It shouldn't be problematic to log in destructors, but make sure that you don't allow your logger to throw exceptions (in particular, don't handle IO errors when logging this way)
Apr
15
comment How to find integer nth roots?
@mbomb007: It seems that it works if x is non negative (this needs to be checked against the spec -- if there is round-to-zero in Python, then this needs to be adjusted for negative numbers). But non integer powers are well defined only for non negative numbers !
Apr
14
comment Should mutexes be mutable?
@VoidStar: This is what I mean by "memoization".
Apr
8
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
7
revised Global operator has to be written very specifically, or else it won't be linked
deleted 4 characters in body
Apr
7
revised Global operator has to be written very specifically, or else it won't be linked
added 36 characters in body
Apr
7
revised Global operator has to be written very specifically, or else it won't be linked
added 254 characters in body
Apr
7
answered Global operator has to be written very specifically, or else it won't be linked
Apr
6
awarded  Caucus
Apr
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
2
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
2
comment Are IEEE floats valid key types for std::map and std::set?
@DonHatch: please note that I realize that my 4 year old answer says something different that I think now -- I will do something about it later.
Apr
2
comment Are IEEE floats valid key types for std::map and std::set?
@DonHatch: ` operator<` has enough guarantees to put doubles into maps. Just don't expect to be able to retrieve a number exactly -- you have to search for all the entries within some epsilon of your number (using eg. map::lower_bound). For instance, I've seen seemingly working code which uses map::find () with literal doubles break completely when called from a different thread. In short, map<double, T> is fine, just don't use find on it (also you should rather use multimap for the same reason, but my answer is 4 year old and this was something I did not realize back then).
Apr
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
1
comment Are IEEE floats valid key types for std::map and std::set?
@DonHatch : operator< on doubles is a correct comparator, if you disallow NaN values. However, the induced equality (!(a < b) && !(b < a)) is useless, but well defined (NaN aside).
Mar
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
29
awarded  Good Answer