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awarded  Popular Question
Oct
5
comment What flag should I use to enforce a good C++11 style?
delete is indeed a red flag. delete[] is an even more red flag. More generally, any sequence of the type "1) acquire a resource, 2) do something, 3) release resource" should encapsulate 1 and 3 into a constructor/destructor, because if 2 fails, then 3 is automatically executed. Memory management is a special case, which is typically handled by standard library classes.
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
27
comment Compile-time map and inverse map values
@prestokeys: I don't know. Probably, but this would likely be more complex.
Sep
27
answered Compile-time map and inverse map values
Sep
26
comment Constants and compiler optimization in C++
@MarcvanLeeuwen: My point is that the variables referenced by the inner mutable iterator are not const in the first place. In this case, yes, you can use const_cast.
Sep
23
revised Why do we define INT_MIN as -INT_MAX - 1?
Fixed title
Sep
23
comment How to iterate over a string in c?
Oh, you're just talking about how they are called ? Zero-terminated is rather a name from the Win32 API world (where string variables are stupidly prefixed by sz), and null-terminated is a more "traditional" (and common) name. Anyway, they both mean the same.
Sep
22
comment How to iterate over a string in c?
@Celeritas: I find the downvote a bit harsh -- C has language support for zero-terminated strings, and the OP is using those. Granted, you can use counted strings (eg. BSTRs in the windows world), but they are less common, and the question is not ambiguous as to which string type one is using.
Sep
22
comment Why is volatile needed in c?
The difference between h and hh is that hh is truncated to some negative power of two by the operation x + h - x. In this case, x + hh and x differ exactly by hh. You can also take your formula, it will give the same result, since x + h and x + hh are equal (it is the denominator which is important here).
Sep
18
comment Organizing C program with lots of static functions
This question belongs to codereview.stackexchange.com
Sep
15
revised c - *(void **) &(int[2]){0,PAGE_SIZE}; meaning?
added 9 characters in body
Sep
15
comment c - *(void **) &(int[2]){0,PAGE_SIZE}; meaning?
@BillyONeal: Inside a macro, this would make sense (however GCC special block syntax would help here, since this is kernel code).
Sep
15
revised c - *(void **) &(int[2]){0,PAGE_SIZE}; meaning?
added 194 characters in body
Sep
15
comment c - *(void **) &(int[2]){0,PAGE_SIZE}; meaning?
@templatetypedef: see stackoverflow.com/questions/24739998/array-as-compound-literal
Sep
15
comment c - *(void **) &(int[2]){0,PAGE_SIZE}; meaning?
@templatetypedef: IIRC, compound literals are lvalues (ie. they are not casts but special constructs).
Sep
15
answered c - *(void **) &(int[2]){0,PAGE_SIZE}; meaning?
Sep
15
revised c - *(void **) &(int[2]){0,PAGE_SIZE}; meaning?
deleted 88 characters in body; edited title
Sep
9
comment What would you use an exit handler for?
Looking back at my answer, I realize that since the OS cleans up the memory at program exit, you don't need atexit for such things. However, it is useful for other resources, like closing network connections, cleaning up temp files, saving program state, etc. In my opinion the answer by @AProgrammer is a better one.
Sep
6
comment Constructors : difference between defaulting and delegating a parameter
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: Sorry if this was unclear: I mean something like a "zero element". Like an empty container or string, a numerical zero, a null pointer, etc. This may prove useful in template contexts. Also, being able to write {} for any empty container is quite useful.