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Aug
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Jul
19
comment How can I generically refer to anything BOOST_FOREACH can iterate over in boost 1.40?
@DaveLillethun First, class hierarchies are very intrusive. C++ chose the python way(ie duck typing) of defining ranges instead. This allows for it to work with legacy code(such as c-arrays and c link lists), which can't be modified to inherit from a new class. Secondly, subtype polymorphism is expensive. Inheriting from a base class, and calling virtual functions adds a lot overhead. If you need to accept any range, you have two options, a template function or type erasure(which any_range does). If you don't have it in you current version you could upgrade or try to copy it over.
Jul
19
answered Mac OS X 10.8 and llvm/clang 3.3 via homebrew
Jun
25
awarded  Announcer
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24
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Jun
17
comment How do I write a recursive for-loop “repeat” macro to generate C code with the CPP preprocessor?
@NathanKurz Also the only resource, I know of is the Chaos preprocessor library from Paul Mensonides. He invented most of these techniques, except they are more sophisticated. For example, the recursive macros uses a recursion state so only the number of scans needed are applied, which is more efficient than the EVAL macro which always applies lots of scans even if they are not needed.
Jun
17
comment How do I write a recursive for-loop “repeat” macro to generate C code with the CPP preprocessor?
Also, the OBSTRUCT(or double defer) just means two scans are needed to fully expand the macro. So, EXPAND(OBSTRUCT(macro))() is equivalent to DEFER(macro)(). Its necessary for REPEAT because of the conditional. The WHEN macro will apply one scan to it. Basically, causing OBSTRUCT(REPEAT_INDIRECT) () to become DEFER(REPEAT_INDIRECT) (). Now if we just had DEFER(REPEAT_INDIRECT) () instead, it would become REPEAT after the scan was applied, causing REPEAT to become painted blue. Does that make sense?
Jun
17
comment How do I write a recursive for-loop “repeat” macro to generate C code with the CPP preprocessor?
@NathanKurz The indirection is necessary to avoid getting a blue painted token. Even though the deferred macro is not evaluated it is scanned by the preprocessor and when it sees a token in its disabling context(say REPEAT again) it will paint it blue and the token can no longer expand. So, we put a REPEAT_INDIRECT macro there so the preprocessor doesn't see the REPEAT token, until another scan is applied, which will have a different disabling context, hopefully, without REPEAT in it.
Jun
17
revised Can we have recursive macros?
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Jun
17
revised How do I write a recursive for-loop “repeat” macro to generate C code with the CPP preprocessor?
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Jun
17
answered How do I write a recursive for-loop “repeat” macro to generate C code with the CPP preprocessor?
Jun
17
revised Is C++ preprocessor metaprogramming Turing-complete?
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Jun
17
revised Is the C99 preprocessor Turing complete?
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Jun
17
revised Can we have recursive macros?
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Jun
17
revised Can we have recursive macros?
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Jun
9
comment C-preprocessor recursive macro
@Pavel If you want to avoid too many nested parenthesis, you can still do something like this: FUNCTION_TABLE( (int, f1, int, int, const char*) (int, f2, int, int, const char*) ), if you define your FUNCTION macro like this #define FUNCTION(ret, name, ...) ret name(__VA_ARGS__);. Or if that doesn't work, you can do better formatting to avoid confusion as well, such as putting each function on a separate line.
Jun
8
revised Can we have recursive macros?
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Jun
8
revised C-preprocessor recursive macro
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Jun
7
answered C-preprocessor recursive macro