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Apr
28
comment Optimum algorithm
@Justin: I'm guessing optimum of all possible arrangements.
Apr
28
comment Optimum algorithm
looks like homework
Apr
27
comment Get all the combinations of List<List<int>> (with partial results, too) in C#
Well, I think the pattern is more general, i.e., if you have an element of list n in your combination, you also need to have elements from lists 1..n-1. That matches the sample output.
Apr
27
comment Get all the combinations of List<List<int>> (with partial results, too) in C#
I think the OP explicitly listed all the required combinations. 4/6 would be "invalid" because you're missing an element from the first list. Just my guess, anyway.
Apr
27
comment Get all the combinations of List<List<int>> (with partial results, too) in C#
Hmm... wouldn't the union of the Cartesian product of each element of the power set :) produce stuff like 4/6 (which is "invalid") when given the sample input?
Apr
27
comment What is the + n for
it's unclear to me what you meant by "two for loops". If it meant "two nested for loops, each iterating from 1 to n", then yes, it would be "+ n^2".
Apr
26
comment Algorithm complexity
@Philip: so the quote just happened to be incorrect by chance. Aw, and I though there was a "deeper" reason ;)
Apr
26
comment Algorithm complexity
@Moron: thanks for taking the time to debate, though ;)
Apr
26
comment Algorithm complexity
@Moron: what you're saying it's correct, but that's not what's written on the wiki page.
Apr
26
comment Algorithm complexity
@Moron: Let c = 3. n^2 is O(3^n), yet it doesn't grow faster than n^3, which is O(n^3). The wiki page is not referring to Theta(c^n), but O(c^N).
Apr
26
comment Algorithm complexity
@Moron: well, O(c^n) just gives you an upper bound. Not every member of O(c^n) grows much faster that every member of O(n^c).
Apr
26
comment Algorithm complexity
Indeed, that's most definitively incorrect. I think the other use is kind of intuitive, though.
Apr
26
comment Algorithm complexity
@Philip: I don't have it with me right now. Now that I check, the Wikipedia page also mentions that use. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_O_notation
Apr
26
comment Algorithm complexity
I've seen Big-O used on the left hand side of an equation, for example in CLRS. It's essentially used to indicate "any function in the set".
Apr
26
comment Algorithm complexity
@Thebigcheeze: I was just pointing out that, if the constants hidden by the O() notation are large, asymptotically less efficient algorithms might be actually faster for smaller inputs.
Apr
26
comment Algorithm complexity
Again, it all depends on the implementation. It might be the case that, for a small array, the overhead of sorting and the sweep is larger than simply comparing all pairs. I doubt this is what you're looking for, though.
Apr
26
comment Algorithm complexity
The first approach is not necessarily better for all inputs. Only if you know the actual constants hidden by the O() notation can you find the "cutoff" point (or at least an approximation to it) where the asymptotically better algorithm should start "winning".
Apr
26
comment Text similarity Algorithms
+1, the "inverted thesaurus" idea sounds pretty neat.
Apr
26
comment Simple logic problem: Finding largest and smallest number among 3 numbers
@Lukas: I see only 3 numbers and no "general" solution (if there are n numbers, array[2] won't give you the maximum). I get your point, though.
Apr
26
comment Simple logic problem: Finding largest and smallest number among 3 numbers
@Lukas: I'd say it's O(1) either way :)