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comment Do we indeed need mutex with attribute “PTHREAD_MUTEX_STALLED” which is opposite to “PTHREAD_MUTEX_ROBUST”?
As stated your question is not clear and will probably be closed unless you clarify what you're asking.
1d
comment Implementation of strstr fails with the last word
@Tony: Regardless of whether it works, fast_strstr is a serious misnomer. This is a very slow approach to strstr, not a fast one.
1d
comment Implementation of strstr fails with the last word
@Olaf: That's part of the signature of the function being implemented, not something you get to choose. As you can see the converted pointer is not being used to write. It's being returned so that callers that use strstr on writable strings to determine where to write can work properly. This is a standard idiom and there's nothing wrong with it.
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awarded  Necromancer
1d
answered Unloading/removing shared libraries from process
2d
comment Why do names that are not part of the implementation still use the double underscore naming convention?
I think we disagree on the importance of rejecting invalid (and often dangerously so; at least non-portable) code by default and on the extent to which this makes C look bad. My view is that the indirect effects are serious: when the compiler doesn't reject the wrong code, it persists and multiplies by cargo cult effects, and you have perceptions that C code is not portable, that compilers are always breaking things, that C is a language where you program to "what happens to work" rather than to a well-specified language, etc.
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comment Why do names that are not part of the implementation still use the double underscore naming convention?
I suppose we can just agree to disagree.
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comment Why do names that are not part of the implementation still use the double underscore naming convention?
@JimBalter: I'm aware that compilers are not required to produce diagnostics for everything that's invalid C, but (1) GCC at least fails to produce diagnostics (by default) for some things it's required to, which are blatantly invalid C, and (2) allowing invalid C, even if it's not required that the compiler diagnose it, seriously hurts C's reputation by allowing so much junk code to persist.
2d
answered Why do names that are not part of the implementation still use the double underscore naming convention?
Jun
30
comment What is the best image downscaling algorithm (quality-wise)?
@jahu: Unless the source image is seriously band-limited (roughly speaking, blurred) to begin with, nearest-neighbor is guaranteed to give very bad aliasing, even for very "small" (just below 1.0) factors. For these cases, area-averaging, if implemented correctly (using weights based on the coverage of a source pixel) will only yield noticeable blurring at points where you're roughly halfway between source pixels. At least one of blurring, ringing, or aliasing is inevitable with linear-transformation-based scaling. To do better you need highly nonlinear warp-based algorithms.
Jun
30
comment How are asynchronous signal handlers executed on Linux?
Being that the relevant threads API is POSIX threads ("pthreads"), yes, the spec comes from POSIX. Modern Linux (since 2.6.0) provides real threads support at the kernel level, so modulo some bugs that were more prevalent in older versions and pretty much all fixed by the end of the 2.6 series, there is not much that's observably wrong. But the terminology is still badly mismatched and inconsistent. Processes are called "thread groups" by the kernel and threads are called "processes". Except in some places where the names have been fixed. :-) Thus it's pretty confusing...
Jun
29
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
29
comment How are asynchronous signal handlers executed on Linux?
@AlexD: Because that produces results that obviously behave contrary to how they're specified. The choice to do so was (partly) failure to understand the scope of how wrong the resulting behavior would be, and (mostly) an assumption that nothing/nobody would care about the behavior being wrong.
Jun
29
comment Are float inequalities guaranteed to be consistent
@Jerem: That's dead code removal and has nothing to do with floating point. It's not removed because it's always-true but because the code path containing the floating point is unreachable. Executing it would be just as invalid as executing it in this form: if (0) { ((a-c)>(b-d)) }
Jun
29
comment Are float inequalities guaranteed to be consistent
I suspect it's not possible to choose values that make #1 false.
Jun
29
comment Are float inequalities guaranteed to be consistent
@TheParamagneticCroissant: Well gcc with -ffast-math might optimize it, but then that's arguably not "a C compiler"... :-)
Jun
29
comment Are float inequalities guaranteed to be consistent
@temple: Indeed, I missed the !'s when I wrote that. Deleting the comment.
Jun
29
comment Are float inequalities guaranteed to be consistent
@Jerem: That's not exactly the right statement, but close, and it's true of any language that implements IEEE arithmetic properly. If you don't want to perform the operation, don't write it. Even without exceptions, algebraic transformations of floating point expressions are almost all invalid because floating point almost completely lacks algebraic structure. So I'm quite serious when I say that if you're going to use floating point, you have to write exactly what you mean.
Jun
29
comment Are float inequalities guaranteed to be consistent
@temple: Even if they were always-true, collapsing them out would not be a valid transformation (optimization) because they can affect the state of the floating point exception flags.
Jun
29
comment Why is modulus with unsigned int runs faster than with unsigned long long?
And obviously a soft-div done one bit at a time is going to take considerably longer for 64 bits than for 32...