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answered What does -pie do exactly?
May
23
comment How to lock files in C/C++ using fopen
@MickLH: Thanks!
May
23
revised How to lock files in C/C++ using fopen
deleted 1 character in body
May
21
answered the use of fflush(FILE* stream)
May
21
awarded  Nice Answer
May
21
comment Why does C saturate float but not integers?
@KeithThompson: Yes, but the way the answer is written it states that a value larger than FLT_MAX causes UB. That's generally not correct. A value outside the range of representable values results in UB, but that range is either implementation-defined or defined by IEEE 754 depending on whether Annex F is supported. The C standard has basically nothing to say about floating point behavior when Annex F is not supported.
May
21
comment Why does C saturate float but not integers?
@Milind: It's not quite clear what you're asking. The closest thing to "saturating" that takes place in floating point arithmetic is operations involving non-finite inputs (infinities and nans). Unless you can clarify what you're asking, the question is likely to be closed.
May
21
comment Why does C saturate float but not integers?
Floating point does not overflow in the C sense of overflow. Assuming Annex F/IEEE semantics, all floating point operations have well-defined results for all operands/arguments. There is no undefined behavior.
May
21
comment Why does C saturate float but not integers?
This answer is incorrect. The range of representable values for IEEE floating point is [-INF,INF] including the endpoints. FLT_MAX is the maximum finite value.
May
20
asked const alias for a non-const object
May
19
comment Using condition flags as GNU C inline asm outputs
Thankfully modern compilers are very good about integrating inline asm and C as long as the constraints are written well. Right now I have the whole lls/sc sequence inside an asm block, which requires separate asm per atomic operation per target. If I could refactor to separate asm blocks for the "ll" and "sc" parts, with C code for the operation in between, I'd have identical efficiency without any of the per-target duplication; all ll/sc-type targets could use the same C code with only the ll and sc arm varying.
May
19
comment Using condition flags as GNU C inline asm outputs
There is certainly something to be said for intrinsics, but the devil is in the details. On some targets they produce very bad code. On ARM they produce a dmb sy barrier (synchronize with all external hardware on the bus) rather than the desired dmb ish (synchronize only with cpu cores). And on others they produce library calls instead of inline code, or produce code that's incompatible with some newer targets when using an older -march rather than allowing the runtime branches with multiple variants we need for such targets.
May
19
awarded  Nice Answer
May
19
answered Using condition flags as GNU C inline asm outputs
May
19
asked Using condition flags as GNU C inline asm outputs
May
17
comment Padding string in C with sprintf and #define constant
sprintf has no protection against writing beyond the end of the pointed-to buffer object. While purely numerical formats are relatively safe, some of them have locale-specific behavior that could result in more data being written than you expect. Or, your program might get ported to a system where size_t is larger and your assumed max number of digits for size_t is no longer correct. There are lots of things that can go wrong, and all it takes is one to make your program dangerous. snprintf on the other hand is always safe as long as the buffer size argument you pass is correct.
May
17
comment Padding string in C with sprintf and #define constant
It's not the closest.
May
17
answered Padding string in C with sprintf and #define constant
May
15
answered Why socklent_t * is used in accept() in socket programming?
May
14
comment Why does printf require a mandatory parameter?
The fundamental point is much simpler - the format string is what tells printf what to do and specifically what types to expect in the variadic arguments. If it were optional, there would be no way to determine anything about the number or type of arguments passed.