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12h
awarded  compiler-construction
14h
comment Using shared libraries on Linux to reduce memory load
Static linking, especially if you use -fdata-sections -ffunction-sections -Wl,--gc-sections, or better yet LTO, will almost certainly save significant space. And static linking always saves time.
19h
answered Granularity of restrict qualifier for overlapping pointers, types
19h
comment Granularity of restrict qualifier for overlapping pointers, types
@JonathanLeffler: It's not "same function call" but the execution lifetime of a particular block associated with the restrict-qualified pointer's lifetime.
22h
comment Multiplying single precision float with 2
Note that you'll need to special-case denormals.
1d
comment What is the most efficient way to manage tracking waiters with futex-based locks?
In the scenario where this happens, there are not waiters on the mutex at the time it is to be destroyed. The problem is that the unlocking thread cannot know this because it observed whether there were waiters at the time it unlocked the mutex; by the time it's sending the FUTEX_WAKE, the object does not exist and there is no way to read whether it has waiters or not. If you're wondering how such a waiter is observed but leaves without FUTEX_WAKE, it corresponds to the case where the thread which does the destruction marks that it's waiting but then gets EAGAIN from FUTEX_WAIT.
1d
comment Using dladdr in release
OP claims to have tried something similar but I think the option was being passed incorrectly.
1d
comment Pointer arithmetic and malloc()/calloc() functions
Anyone know the right duplicate to mark? SO's search is unhelpful...
1d
comment Pointer arithmetic and malloc()/calloc() functions
As for the second part of your question, it's a duplicate of the near-daily question about unsequenced ++ and -- operators.
1d
comment Pointer arithmetic and malloc()/calloc() functions
Casting the result of malloc is bad practice. The whole point of it returning void * is that it converts implicitly to whatever type you need.
1d
comment What is the most efficient way to manage tracking waiters with futex-based locks?
In programs that are avoiding global state, I think that kind of use is the norm, not the exception. The canonical example is reference counting in the form I mentioned (or any form without global state and atomics). In general, if an object is "part of" a larger data structure, you can use the container's lock to synchronize destruction, but otherwise you're out of luck. Another important usage case is synchronization objects for passing data to a thread start function; often you want these to live on the stack of the caller of pthread_create.
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comment What is the most efficient way to manage tracking waiters with futex-based locks?
Yes, but obviously putting the mutex in the object (or in an associated object that's destroyed at the same time) is the only way that scales. As for glibc, what happened there is that Ulrich Drepper didn't even understand (or at least didn't accept) that pthread objects can be used to synchronize the end of their own lifetimes when he implemented them, and actually had them accessing the storage after the atomic release operation. Now Torvald Riegel and others are trying to fix them, but they've run into the question of whether spurious FUTEX_WAKE matters too...
1d
comment What is the most efficient way to manage tracking waiters with futex-based locks?
By the way, I agree that your refcounting design with an atomic counter accessed after any potential unlock should work. The impossibility I was referring to was in regards to using a non-atomic counter protected by a mutex, which would be affected by the spurious-wake issue.
1d
comment What is the most efficient way to manage tracking waiters with futex-based locks?
I agree it would be nice to have a convention that FUTEX_WAKE isn't sent on addresses not "owned" by the caller, but I think this renders most uses of FUTEX_WAKE invalid. Most of them could be salvaged via replacement with FUTEX_WAKE_OP, but some could not. Since historical practice has been to "misuse" FUTEX_WAKE this way (it's done all over glibc, for example) I think it would be hard to get a consensus from everyone using the interface to fix the offending usage.
1d
comment What is the most efficient way to manage tracking waiters with futex-based locks?
Thankfully, FUTEX_WAKE does not semantically "access" the pointed-to object; rather, it accesses a queue of waiters, which is necessarily (assuming no race conditions in the userspace program) empty if the pointed-to object was already destroyed, associated with the current backing (if any) for the virtual address. Thus, there's nothing formally invalid about sending these spurious futex wakes, but if anything in the program sends them, it makes it hard to use the return value of FUTEX_WAIT and FUTEX_WAKE in any meaningful way.
1d
comment What is the most efficient way to manage tracking waiters with futex-based locks?
It's not that simple -- if you "separate the protection of access to the object itself (the object's lock) from protection of the object's existence" you just move the problem to a different object whose destruction also needs to be synchronized. And reference counting is not a solution to this problem; it's actually the canonical example where this problem arises -- a thread sees that it has the last reference and thereby destroys the object when it's done with it, but another thread which just released its reference might be about to send the futex wake for it.
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comment What is the most efficient way to manage tracking waiters with futex-based locks?
Also note that the only way to avoid the problem, even if you're careful to make an effort to avoid it, is to refrain from using atomics followed by FUTEX_WAKE when there are waiters, and instead use FUTEX_WAKE_OP to make the wake (effectively) atomic with respect to the atomic memory operation.
1d
comment What is the most efficient way to manage tracking waiters with futex-based locks?
The problem is that, in this scheme, you're subject to spurious wakes that cause the waiter to think it was woken intentionally when it was actually woken by another thread blindly sending a FUTEX_WAKE after making an atomic change to unlock an object, which was subsequently freed, and its memory reassigned to the new object that's now seeing the spurious wake. The only way I can see around this is to have a global contract that futexes never be used in a way that can give rise to this, but that's impossible to enforce if various application and library modules are all using futexes.
2d
comment How to tell if glibc is used
@LoganPickup: I don't see why not. But if you insist on using a build system that's not amenable to configure on those targets, you can just have hard-coded configure results (config.h, etc.) for them since they're essentially single, tightly-controlled environments.
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awarded  Necromancer