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1h
comment Can a child process change a static variable shared by his parent?
No. If you want to do this, you need to explicitly allocate shared memory and use synchronization primitives that ensure one process sees the changes the other makes.
18h
comment waitpid() return value 0 along with errno EINTR
@ParagGoel: Indeed. Any standard function (except a few specified not to) can clobber errno as part of normal, successful operation. The only time errno is meaningful is when the return value of the library function that just returned indicates an error.
20h
comment In C, Why are child processes not reaped automatically?
In case it wasn't clear: the OS is not unnecessarily wasting resources that could be freed during the interval between process exit and waiting on the pid, but it does necessarily prevent reuse of an important resource -- the space of process identifiers -- until you wait.
20h
comment In C, Why are child processes not reaped automatically?
No. There are only finitely many pids available: at most, 2^(8*sizeof(pid_t)), and in practice often as few as 32768. Individual users may even be subject to much lower limits. If you do not wait on them, they'll eventually be exhausted and you cannot make more processes.
20h
answered In C, Why are child processes not reaped automatically?
1d
comment open() system call waiting
@BasileStarynkevitch: No, OP is asking about creating a lockfile and what to do in the case where it already exists and you want to wait for it to be deleted.
1d
answered open() system call waiting
Mar
23
comment Difference between pthread_exit, pthread_join and pthread_detach
@bobo: That's not really a reason to detach threads. You wouldn't call open without storing the resulting file descriptor just because you don't know how many times you're going to open. Instead of trying to have an array for all files you'll open, you'd store the descriptors with the data/task they go with. You should do the exact same thing for thread ids or any other resource identifier - track it with the data structures it's attached to.
Mar
20
answered Why sciencific notation for “(double)123456” with “%.4g” conversion is “1.235e+05” instead of 1.234e+05
Mar
20
comment Is FLT_RADIX ever not 2 in c11 for modern general purpose computers?
Current IEEE standard also defines non-binary types, but those are not the ones referred to by Annex F. F.2 Types reads: "The float type matches the IEC 60559 single format. The double type matches the IEC 60559 double format." The terms "single" and "double" come from the original version of the standard; these formats have since been renamed to "binary32" and "binary64".
Mar
20
answered Is FLT_RADIX ever not 2 in c11 for modern general purpose computers?
Mar
20
comment C printf %a and %La
@AntoineL: I'm talking about what happens if you use %.1a. With a leading 1 you only get 5 bits of precision. With a leading digit in the range 8..f, you have 8 bits.
Mar
20
comment C printf %a and %La
@PascalCuoq: That only applies if the printing precision is sufficient to represent the value exactly (which is true with no explicit precision specified). If the caller limits the precision, it's undesirable to use a leading 1.
Mar
20
comment C printf %a and %La
@ItsASecret: I consider that an implementation flaw. From a standpoint of presenting the most useful information at a given precision specification, you want the digit before the radix point to always be in the range 8..f. Printing a 1 results in gratuitous loss of precision. But it is a valid implementation.
Mar
20
answered C printf %a and %La
Mar
20
comment Why is void main() so popular?
+1 to this answer since you've got the basic idea right, but I think most of these books were written post-standardization. The issue is just that their authors were incompetent but managed to get out books that lots of people read. IMO most of the responsibility for the misuse of the C language and people's misconceptions (generally negative views) about C can be traced to bad teaching in the form of bad books and bad instructors.
Mar
20
comment Difference between pthread_exit, pthread_join and pthread_detach
@Janaka: A good real-world example I use is when a worker thread has significant costly cleanup work to do before exiting but after it's already produced the result the creator wanted. In that case you would not want to call pthread_join and block progress in another thread until it finishes. You could arrange to have another thread call pthread_join later when it does finish, but this is probably inconvenient, so it's easier to just detach the thread and let its lifetime end when it exits with no need to join it.
Mar
19
comment Does memory dependence speculation prevent BN_consttime_swap from being constant-time?
I don't think asm is even a solution. Nothing says the cpu is not free to perform additional optimizations. Certainly a dynrec-based virtual cpu could do this; in the future real cpus may too. IMO the only valid approach to constant-time is explicit sleeping/spinning to a desired total time, and thankfully that is perfectly expressible in C.
Mar
19
comment Does memory dependence speculation prevent BN_consttime_swap from being constant-time?
Making condition (and possibly other objects involved) volatile would at least give you a lot better chance of getting the desired behavior, since the compiler would no longer be free to make transformations that alter the number of accesses (and thus evaluations of the condition) performed.
Mar
18
comment What is the correct way to obtain (-1)^n?
@Alnitak: The conversion is only valid for non-negative values of n (e.g. unsigned type).