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5h
reviewed Reject C library to convert unicode code points to UTF8?
8h
comment C library to convert unicode code points to UTF8?
@user2284570: No. A file is a sequence of bytes not a sequence of bits. Endianness is byte order. This is a consequence of the fact that you address bytes, not bits. Some big endian CPU vendors number the bits of a byte backwards in their technical docs, but this is purely a notational quirk and has nothing to do with data interchange. On serial ports there is of course a bit order, but that's defined by the hardware, not cpu endianness.
8h
comment C library to convert unicode code points to UTF8?
@user2284570: UTF-8 is a byte stream. It does not have endianness. There is no such thing as endianness unless you are inspecting or modifying the representation of types.
11h
comment C library to convert unicode code points to UTF8?
@user2284570: c is the codepoint (input) and b is a pointer to the output buffer (bytes).
1d
answered Effects of sched_yield() from a thread running with SCHED_RR scheduling policy
1d
comment How to implement stdarg in C
In case you need a reference for the behavior being undefined, in C11 it's 6.5.6 Additive operators, paragraph 8.
1d
comment How to implement stdarg in C
@Olaf: No. The pointer addition in these kinds of macros is explicitly undefined, not implementation-defined. Being undefined does not preclude the possibility of a particular implementation choosing to define a behavior as an extension to the language, but implementation-defined behavior has a very specific meaning: that the C standard requires an implementation to choose and document a particular behavior. Undefined behavior on the other hand means the standard places no constraints on the behavior of the program.
1d
comment In Sun's libm, what does *(1+(int*)&x) do (where x is of type double)?
It produces undefined behavior.
1d
comment How to implement stdarg in C
@Olaf: No, ARM has it perfectly right. You're just misunderstanding what you're talking about.
1d
comment How to implement stdarg in C
Of course if a compiler provides a stdarg.h, it has to meet the assumptions of its own stdarg.h, which may place constraints on what the compiler can do. This is why good compilers instead use something like __builtin_va_arg: so they don't impose any constraints on themselves. However OP's question was about writing a stdarg.h yourself. That is something that you fundamentally cannot do just by knowing the ABI. You also need additional assumptions about what the compiler will and won't do within a function.
1d
comment How to implement stdarg in C
You're missing the point. I did not claim the compiler can modify the calling convention, just the layout of automatic objects within its own call frame. The latter is NOT governed by ABI.
1d
comment How to implement stdarg in C
Of course it's true that some historical compilers were so primitive that &argN was always the stack slot it was passed on, or that they intentionally chose to forgo optimizations to facilitate legacy stdarg.h implementations. But in that case, it worked only because of assumptions about the non-ABI-relevant behavior of the compiler, not just by knowing the ABI.
1d
comment How to implement stdarg in C
@Olaf: It's independent of ABI. Even if you know that args are passed the the stack, you do not know that &argN is the address of the stack slot it was passed on. Within the function body, argN is just a normal automatic-storage object. The compiler is free to position it wherever it wants (as long as it copies the original value from wherever the calling convention put it) and this is purely an internal consideration of how the function was compiled, not ABI.
2d
comment How to implement stdarg in C
Fair enough. FYI, despite calling it "wrong", I'm not the one who downvoted your answer.
2d
answered How to implement stdarg in C
2d
comment How to implement stdarg in C
This answer is wrong; it assumes ancient compiler technology where the address of argument objects will actually be the address they were (or would have been) passed on the stack. There's no reason this need be the case. Even on archs like i386 where the arguments to external functions are passed on the stack, the compiler is completely free to move them to separate local storage and have & yield a pointer to that new storage. It's also free to perform inlining/LTO in which case the arguments might never live on the stack at all.
Aug
26
comment Why is the use of alloca() not considered good practice?
@ToddLehman: Then there's no point in using alloca. Use a fixed-size 63-element array. The stack usage will not be noticeably different, and your program will perform better (because alloca requires a frame pointer register or equivalent, increasing register pressure and complexity of local data access). As discussed above, nearly the only places where you can't just substitute a constant-size array in place of alloca are places where alloca is unsafe.
Aug
26
comment Why is the use of alloca() not considered good practice?
@ToddLehman: Where does the size of that "variable-size last element" come from?
Aug
25
comment Bitwise operation on signed integer
@this: See 6.2.6.2 Integer types. At the end of paragraph 2: Which of these applies is implementation-defined, as is whether the value with sign bit 1 and all value bits zero (for the first two), or with sign bit and all value bits 1 (for ones' complement), is a trap representation or a normal value.
Aug
25
comment Bitwise operation on signed integer
@this: C allows a 2s-complement variant with INT_MIN==-INT_MAX. :-(