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7h
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8h
comment readdir blocked when using readlink in it, but readdir_r is ok. Why?
This line is also UB: strncpy(name, link2, NAME_LEN); -- you cannot overwrite the d_name field of the returned dirent because it might not have sufficient space to store a different name.
8h
comment readdir blocked when using readlink in it, but readdir_r is ok. Why?
Your use of readdir_r is definitely not ok. You're passing it an uninitialized pointer to store the result in, and thereby invoking undefined behavior. That's probably what makes your loop terminate earlier than with readdir.
14h
answered fstat() not reading the correct file size
18h
comment printf(“%p”) and casting to (void *)
@LưuVĩnhPhúc: There is no portable way to print a function pointer, though the implementation-defined cast to void * usually works on systems you might care about.
21h
comment How do I ask for “at least” a size of an int in C
@Mehrdad: Probably, but often there is an added cost to loading/storing and performing operations on shorts. On some old x86's the operand size prefix prevented pipelining; perhaps now the only cost is increased instruction cache usage. Of course this is another reason the "fast" types are misguided -- which type is faster may very well depend on the specific cpu model, not just the ISA. And you can't practically have the type change depending on -march or something because that would break ABI.
1d
comment How do I ask for “at least” a size of an int in C
Except that int_fast32_t is misdefined on important archs like x86_64 where it's actually a much slower type (64-bit instead of 32-bit): for +/-/* both are identical speed, but for / it's much slower, and of course loads/stores are slower since you use twice as many cache lines and twice as much memory bandwidth. So I'd be really hesitant to use it. I'm not aware of any arch that has a 32-bit int where it's not the fastest type for working with "at least 32-bit" integers.
1d
comment printf(“%p”) and casting to (void *)
+1 for a specific example of a crazy mainframe like this.
1d
comment printf(“%p”) and casting to (void *)
@LưuVĩnhPhúc: Function pointers are a completely different issue that OP's. They don't even necessarily have a conversion to/from data pointers. OTOH all data pointers have conversions to/from void * and are usually represented the exact same way.
1d
answered printf(“%p”) and casting to (void *)
2d
answered Is it possible to have millisecond precision with setrlimit in c
2d
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
20
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
20
comment printing type of unknown size
@Clifford: "Use a different language" is not a valid answer/advice for solving a problem in a given language. There are a lot of important C things that don't work in C++, and even if they do, idiomatic C code is anti-idiomatic C++, highly frowned upon as C++, and likely to produce lots of spurious warnings or errors (or worse yet, subtly different behavior) when treated as C++.
Jul
20
comment printing type of unknown size
You can determine the signedness of an expression (of rank at least int) without evaluating it via (1?-1:(expr))<0).
Jul
19
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
19
comment how can I parameterize select function in scandir
readdir_r is aactually being deprecated because it's not safe on systems with no NAME_MAX. Use readdir.
Jul
18
comment Explicit ignore warning from -Wcast-qual: cast discards ‘__attribute__((const))’ qualifier from pointer target type
@AlterMann: That's a completely different warning that occurs when you make an implicit conversion which discards the const qualifier (which is invalid C; C does not have such an implicit conversion). It's not the warning OP is seeing.
Jul
18
answered BASIC: Compilier warning “return discards qualifiers from pointer target type”
Jul
18
comment Is there an O(1) way to separate real and imaginary parts of complex array when passed to pgplot?
I'm not 100% sure whether this has well-defined behavior, but it's the closest thing to a solution...