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visits member for 4 years, 7 months
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31m
answered malloc() in Linux
2h
comment How can I avoid overflow in modular multiplication?
Sorry, I was mistaken about that. Deleted the irrelevant comment from the question itself. Anyway, to compute 1<<n mod m if m isn't constant, you simply use the fact that 1<<n fits in your integer type (n is half the width) and compute it directly. That's the easy part. The potentially hard part is multiplying the result by x.
4h
comment How can I avoid overflow in modular multiplication?
I'm not 100% sure right off that the last multiply I described there can't overflow, so you should check it. If it can, you might have to break down the computation further or find some trick to work around it.
4h
comment How can I avoid overflow in modular multiplication?
Mathematically, x<<n mod m is just x mod m times 1<<n mod m, so you just need to know the value of 1<<n for each shift n that's involved in your long multiplication. For the procedure I described, there's only one such n: 1 for the two-bit example, and likewise 8 if you were multiplying two 16-bit integers mod m. 1<<n mod m is a single constant you can pre-compute and hard-code.
15h
answered How can I avoid overflow in modular multiplication?
20h
revised restrict for return type and local variables
added 2 characters in body
21h
answered restrict for return type and local variables
23h
comment Setting the stacksize of the threads
@brainovergrow: Indeed, I didn't realize immediately how much was wrong with OP's program. Your answer is better, but this answer still has useful content in the answer and comments so I don't really want to delete it..
1d
comment Setting the stacksize of the threads
Also, you have two different objects called myattr. One is local to main and the other is global. This is probably part of your confusion.
1d
comment Setting the stacksize of the threads
How do you think your code is measuring the stack size of the main thread or the newly created threads? It's not, and in fact there's no standard way to measure it. All you're doing is re-printing what you set in the attribute object. You need to either trust that the attribute is being honored if you code is valid, or use a nonstandard function like pthread_getattr_np (if supported on your system) to get a running thread's attributes, or use an external memory use monitoring tool to observe the amount of memory used.
1d
comment Setting the stacksize of the threads
Your edit (trying to comment out the pthread_attr_destroy) broke the formatting and potentially changed the question. Please don't make edits like this based on answers unless you're going to add text to the question explaining that the behavior remains the same with the program changed.
1d
answered Setting the stacksize of the threads
1d
answered How to check if data is still in memory
Jan
29
comment POLLHUP vs POLLNVAL, or what is POLLHUP?
Maybe I should have reading/writing switched then?
Jan
28
comment What's the bug with a possible wrapper function of realloc C function?
I would consider passing a size of 0 to realloc to be a bug to begin with. Different implementations vary, often in non-conforming ways, with regard to how they handle this case. realloc to size 0 is not specified to be the same as free except on implementations where malloc(0) returns a null pointer, but some implementations wrongly make it the same, and there's no clean way to handle the difference (to determine whether it's an error or an expected behavior). Just avoid doing this.
Jan
28
answered What's the bug with a possible wrapper function of realloc C function?
Jan
28
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
27
comment Non-blocking call for reading descriptor
Probably, but select is a horrible idea anyway because FD_SET invokes UB if fd>=FD_SETSIZE. Just use poll.
Jan
26
awarded  Necromancer
Jan
26
comment Why shmat() of aio-stress.c in LTP uses a non-null shmaddr, 0x50000000?
The fact that it happens to work on your system has no bearing on whether it's valid.