72,350 reputation
14144238
bio website
location Toronto, Canada
age
visits member for 5 years, 7 months
seen 7 hours ago

"Enterprise" developer/architect with an EE background and experience/interest in:

  • Microsoft .NET / Visual Studio
  • Delphi
  • SQL Server, SQL CE
  • Web Services (REST, SOAP, WSE, WCF)
  • Web Applications (MVC, MVVM, JS)
  • Embedded Systems (HCxx, PIC, etc.)
  • UI Design & Data Visualization
  • Project Management
  • and probably a bunch of other things...

Jun
14
comment In a Linq predicate, will the compiler optimize a “scalar” call to Enumerable.Min() or will it be called for each item?
In other words, LINQ isn't an excuse to write poorly-performing code. It's generally safe to assume that any method on a sequence is O(N) - and remember that O(N) means worst case, not best, average, actual, etc. If parts of LINQ decide to optimize certain calls, like testing if an IEnumerable<T> implements IList<T> to optimize the Count() method, then that's an implementation detail that developers shouldn't rely on. Moreover, it's an aspect of the library, not the compiler.
Jun
13
comment How to combine two view models in razor MVC asp.net
MVC doesn't have "post back".
Jun
13
comment Custom WinForm Control causing slow performance in IDE
Um yeah, you should never, ever, ever have to call GC.Collect, well... ever, but especially not inside a tight loop. If you do, you've done something terribly, terribly wrong. Like, for example, creating a massive resource leak.
Jun
7
comment C# Object Pooling Pattern implementation
@YairNevet: Should be clear from the example - so that the created objects can implement IDisposable and deterministically release themselves from the pool (which requires a reference to the pool) when disposed.
Jun
5
comment Amateur C# Programmer: Code Critique
@RonanThibaudau: I didn't actually say that it should be named My. I don't think you actually read that whole paragraph. That was a hypothetical name that I threw out because the original code sample gave no indication of what the actual name was.
Jun
1
comment Why doesn't my class write to a text file?
First of all, StreamReader and StreamWriter implement IDisposable and therefore should be in using blocks. Second, FileMode.Open requires the file to already exist; if your goal is to overwrite, it should be FileMode.Create. Third, what in God's name is going on with the assignment of the plane properties to the method args? And fourth, does the file actually get created? Does it not exist at all, or is it just empty? If it gets created (using FileMode.Create) but is empty, then the probably is that you don't have any data to write to it.
May
30
comment Using ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem in ASP.NET in a high traffic scenario
@IanThompson: I'd encourage you to read the documentation for whatever database driver/library you're using. There's not one single answer to that question, and it can vary over time. Oracle, for example, only started supporting async recently, and may still not support TPL-style async.
May
26
comment Get the IP address of the remote host
Type safety isn't everything. This code will throw a hard-to-debug NullReferenceException if used from a thread (e.g. a task awaiter, very common in modern Web API code) or in a self-hosted context. At least most of the other answers will just return null.
May
19
comment Why doesn't “views” work correctly as an MVC route prefix?
@malkam: I'm quite aware that there's a method of the Controller class called View. It wouldn't be possible to build even the most basic of MVC apps without it. Nevertheless, I fail to see how that's relevant here.
May
14
comment Generating a Not-Quite-Globally Unique Identifier
It doesn't seem like you read the question - it specifically states the requirement that only decimal digits are allowed and it must be 12 digits or less.
May
11
comment Is recursion a feature in and of itself?
Another reason I can think of to take away marks is that the instructor may have believed, based on an apparently inappropriate use of recursion, that this student thought it worked like a goto, and just didn't want to say so outwardly - so he just fell back on a lame but less controversial excuse.
May
11
comment Is recursion a feature in and of itself?
Any potentially risky recursive algorithm can always be trivially rewritten to use an explicit stack - the call stack is, after all, just a stack. In this case, if you rewrote the solution to use a stack, it would look ridiculous - further evidence that the recursive answer is not a very good one.
May
11
comment Is recursion a feature in and of itself?
I agree that the recursive version of this particular task is less readable; it's a stupid thing for an instructor to dock marks just for using it because it wasn't covered, but it would make sense to dock marks for using recursion when it's both unnecessary and sub-optimal. He's 0 for 2 here; it's a task that's trivially easy to do in a loop, and recursion wastes stack frames (what if the input was piped in from a file? An overflow is definitely possible!) and obfuscates the true intent. If I were the instructor, I might think he was trying, unsuccessfully, to show off.
May
10
comment Bulk insert/Update with Petapoco
Another answer pointed out a serious bug in the auto-increment path here that causes every record to be inserted twice - but kind of made a mess of everything in the process. All I needed to do was remove the following line: object id = _dbType.ExecuteInsert(this, cmd, primaryKeyName);. I'd go ahead and edit your post, but you should probably check to make sure that said line can actually be safely removed.
May
10
comment Is it possible to eliminate “empty” facets with Elastic Search?
@Thorsten: I could remove the field, but this is a fairly deeply nested field in a document that's being automatically serialized by NEST, so it would involve almost a total rewrite of that code, unless it has some setting to ignore null/empty strings (which I couldn't find). Excluding is most likely the (simple) answer, I'm pretty new to ES and forgot about that option.
Apr
6
comment What do these new C# 6 features do?
Fair enough. It's unfortunate that both of the examples that were chosen (Dictionary<TKey, TValue> and JObject) are both types that do have such a method and already support the existing initializer syntax. Are there no better examples in the BCL, where this alternative can't be used?
Apr
6
comment What do these new C# 6 features do?
I don't understand the dictionary initializer thing. The counterexamples that keep getting given are m = new Dictionary<int, int>(); m[1] = 2; and so on. But we already have a real dictionary initializer syntax: new Dictionary<int, int> { { 1, 2 }, { 3, 4 } }. Any idea why we needed another syntax for it?
Apr
5
comment C# Object Pooling Pattern implementation
@DimitreNovatchev: Refer to the parts of my answer where it says, first, You might be wondering why none of these methods bother checking to see whether or not the store has reached the maximum size., and then, As explained earlier, we're using the Semaphore to control concurrency instead of religiously checking the status of the item store. As long as acquired items are correctly released, there's nothing to worry about. It's possible that I'm wrong, but I don't think so. If you can produce a test case that causes an exception, I'll update the implementation.
Apr
5
comment C# Object Pooling Pattern implementation
@DimitreNovatchev: Sorry, but I don't think your understanding of how this works is correct. AcquireLazy doesn't test it to avoid an exception, it tests it to decide whether or not it should use the store (early return) or create a new instance. That's why AcquireEager doesn't check either. The LazyExpanding version is similar, but won't reuse any instances until all available instances are created. None of these need to catch an exception because concurrent access is controlled by a Semaphore which ensures that consumers are never able to acquire more than what the store already has.
Apr
5
comment C# Object Pooling Pattern implementation
@DimitreNovatchev: I will have to take another look at this when I have more time (it's been a very long time since I've looked at this question), but I don't think what you say is possible. That Fetch method should only be called if the previous conditionals determine that there is an item available (i.e. final count is less than size). If it tries to call Fetch on a zero-item collection then something is wrong.