1,584 reputation
1127
bio website
location
age
visits member for 4 years
seen 18 hours ago

Oct
6
comment maven - separate some resources into a jar with a different classifier
No, they won't always have all modules on the classpath, they'd probably have between 2 and 10, depending on exactly what they were doing, and the 10 might be different for each client.
Oct
5
comment maven - separate some resources into a jar with a different classifier
2) It would double the number of modules because for each current module foo:bar, there would now be another module foo:bar-models. 3) But to wrap them in a single artifact, I'd need yet another module, right?
Oct
5
comment maven - separate some resources into a jar with a different classifier
Yeah, this could work. It does make me feel a bit uneasy though for a few reasons. First, the new project would have an empty src/main/java, which just seems a bit odd. Second, it would double the number of modules in a multi-module project that already has >10 modules. Third, it would double the number of steps to make a release, since I would always have to be releasing things in pairs.
Aug
16
comment create XML from text and element offsets in scala
This is a nice solution too other than that equality issue. I'm guessing this solution creates a few more Text nodes or something like that, and so the XML compares unequal even though the normalized forms would be the same...
Aug
16
comment create XML from text and element offsets in scala
Oh, the one thing "wrong" with your solution (well, the one thing I didn't specify well) was that I didn't want to sort based on the element name - instead you should just use the elements in the order they were passed in. That's pretty easy to accomplish by just modifying your spanOrder definition.
Aug
16
comment create XML from text and element offsets in scala
This is a pretty cool solution! It took me a little while to wrap my head around it, but this is exactly the kind of thing I was hoping for - you create the nodes directly, not the XML.loadString kind of hack I was doing. For anyone else reading this solution, the key is to realize that, due to the interval sorting order, all elements within a span are completely processed before the span itself is processed. Thus, all the main for-loop needs to do is take the nested elements, interleave them with the appropriate text, add them to the element, and push the element back on the map.
Jul
23
comment In Scala, what does “view” do?
Nitpick: the statement "since sum accesses all elements, there is no point in using view here" isn't correct, because filter will try to create a full Vector before calling sum on it. Try replacing 1000 with 1000000000 in the original example and if you leave the view off you'll see the same memory problems you demonstrate above.
Mar
29
comment why use foldLeft instead of procedural version?
Right, but whoever reads my code will also have to spend those few days learning it as well. So it's not a single-time cost, it's a cost for me and for all future readers of my code. I'm much less worried about me, and much more worried about the future readers.
Mar
29
comment why use foldLeft instead of procedural version?
I'm finding it difficult to translate all your metaphors into actual code guidelines. Can you explain what's the "light" and what's the "bed" in the question at hand?
Mar
29
comment why use foldLeft instead of procedural version?
I know some folks love this abbreviation, but I really try to avoid this kind of thing. I have no intuitive association between division "/" and the fold/reduce operation. If I'm going to use a fold, I'd much rather use foldLeft so that someone who doesn't understand it can easily Google for it. I guess it's just a matter of who you think will be reading your code...
Mar
29
comment why use foldLeft instead of procedural version?
No really I don't mean that. The emphasis should be on "easily". Do you really believe that if I took a random Java coder off the street showed them the above two versions of the code, they would say that the foldLeft version was easier to understand?
Mar
29
comment why use foldLeft instead of procedural version?
Great link, thanks!
Mar
29
comment why use foldLeft instead of procedural version?
I still don't get what you mean by "declarative". The code you added above just argues that it's good to reuse existing function definitions. But that's true no matter what kind of code you write...
Mar
28
comment why use foldLeft instead of procedural version?
Note also that both versions of the function are side effect free. It's perfectly natural (and common) to write functions that are side effect free but have procedural implementations.
Mar
28
comment why use foldLeft instead of procedural version?
I'm not sure I see how this all applies. I would describe both the procedural version and the functional version as "given a collection and an initial string, repeatedly apply replace on the string given the replacement values in the collection". Could you translate them into your terms and explain how the first version is "how" and the second version is "what"?
Mar
28
comment why use foldLeft instead of procedural version?
Interesting. I see that fold exists on parallel collections but the implementation is still sequential. But I can imagine that the restricted definition allows for a parallel implementation that you can't do with with foldLeft. Seems like fold should be added to non-parallel collections to make the transition to parallel ones seamless...
Mar
28
comment why use foldLeft instead of procedural version?
On second thought, one optimization would be to use a while loop, which would typically be faster than foreach. I looked at it and IndexedSeqOptimized uses a tail-recursive definition of foldLeft which is probably about as efficient as the while loop. So I guess I'm sold on the extra optimizations argument. ;-)
Mar
28
comment why use foldLeft instead of procedural version?
So in Scala 2.9, what will happen with foldLeft in a parallel collection?
Mar
28
comment why use foldLeft instead of procedural version?
But not as simple as collection.sum. ;-)
Mar
28
comment why use foldLeft instead of procedural version?
I guess the point about future optimizations of foldLeft is good, though it's hard to imagine what kind of optimizations those might be...