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Jul
29
revised Stable Cotangent
added 385 characters in body
Jul
27
comment Informing clang that inline assembly reads a particular region of memory
@DavidWohlferd (It could be better code -- it fails to notice that the initial stores to c.a and c.b are dead. But it correctly reloads their values from memory in between the asm and the printf.)
Jul
27
comment Informing clang that inline assembly reads a particular region of memory
@DavidWohlferd The code in the link you provided is incorrect. It's annotated to read memory, but the assembly language is writing memory. (The manual is indeed misleading. An input is never a clobber.) I get correct assembly output (for any value of -DPAD) from gcc-4.9 with the modified code here: pastebin.com/QSSC8JaX
Jul
26
comment Informing clang that inline assembly reads a particular region of memory
@DavidWohlferd I'm sorry, could you be more specific? gcc 5.1.1 generates code that is not wrong, for your example (if I'm reading it correctly).
Jul
25
revised Informing clang that inline assembly reads a particular region of memory
deleted 17 characters in body
Jul
25
comment Informing clang that inline assembly reads a particular region of memory
@Olaf Where did you see this documented? I honestly cannot remember where I learned it.
Jul
25
asked Informing clang that inline assembly reads a particular region of memory
Jul
24
comment Why does 2+ 40 equal 42?
@JonHanna You are formally correct on both counts, but I am certain that the requirement not to treat U+0085 as a newline arises from bitter experience of the crap out there on the Web, and I am surprised that there is not a requirement to treat U+FFFE as if it were U+FFEF for the same reason.
Jul
22
comment how does this even compile
I removed my downvote, but this is still not a terribly good answer to the question -- to be fair, I expect we cannot give a good answer without additional information.
Jul
22
comment How memset initializes an array of integers by -1?
You are slightly wrong about the reason initializing with 0 is OK. It is OK because 0 fits in an unsigned char (so it is not truncated when used as the second argument to memset) and because the bit pattern in memory for a sizeof(int)-byte zero is identical to the bit pattern in memory for sizeof(int) sequential one-byte zeros. Both of those things must be true for this to work. In fact, those things are true for exactly two numbers in twos-complement arithmetic: 0 and -1.
Jul
22
comment how does this even compile
<del>There is no address-of operator in the OP's code.</del> I see now that you are suggesting that the OP should have written an address-of operator. You could stand to be less terse.
Jul
22
comment how does this even compile
You misread your link. ptr[idx] is identical to *(ptr + idx), not to ptr + idx.
Jul
22
comment how does this even compile
Is mpls_RuntimeInfo_t itself a pointer type?
Jul
21
comment Why does 2+ 40 equal 42?
ecma-international.org/ecma-262/6.0/#sec-white-space (as linked from Felix King's answer) specifically calls out U+FEFF to be considered whitespace in JS source code. U+FFFE is not listed, but that strikes me as an error of omission.
Jul
20
comment ++*p++ does'nt work on second element in array?
Hint: ++*++p would have done what you expected ++*p++ to do.
Jul
18
awarded  r
Jul
16
comment Segmentation Fault :11
Oh, probably what Sourav said.
Jul
16
comment Segmentation Fault :11
Addendum: the program does, in fact, crash when I run it, but that's not what your error messages say.
Jul
16
comment Segmentation Fault :11
(1) is correct; (2) is perfectly fine in C++
Jul
16
comment Segmentation Fault :11
@CoryKramer That's not on the stack, it's a global. (The default stack limit on OSX is 8MB, so that definitely would be the problem if it were on the stack, but it isn't.)