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Apr
20
comment Looking to understand RTSP and H.264 Encapsulation
Probably because you meant RTSPDump Not RTMPDump bisqwit.iki.fi/source/ms-rtsp-dump
Apr
18
awarded  Caucus
Apr
2
comment Detecting TCP Client Disconnect
No problem, but the facts are apparent. Consider that a connection is a concept. E.g. through a NAT device the 'connection' to the client is definitely not the same 'connection' as the clients to you. It would be idiotic to argue this with anyone, let alone me. Tsk. Tsk.
Apr
2
comment Detecting TCP Client Disconnect
Drop the connection that fails it? What if the Timeout is as per the default recommended of 200 msec? Shouldn't it back-off to a certain reasonable timeout? Maybe that will cause too much Context Switching for you? Still dropping a connection when the such Timeout is so low is not sound advice...
Apr
2
comment Detecting TCP Client Disconnect
Pointlessly nitpicking? Is constrained signal reception an example of such? Anything that causes a Connection Reset is normal? Even a forged packet? I HIGHLY suggest instead of repeat you RESEARCH, this way you don't have to rely on your apparent lack of understanding of various topics such as but not limited to [what you claimed to be] the 'fixed sized' IP header... Tsk Tsk
Apr
2
comment Detecting TCP Client Disconnect
Because obviously you can't read. From your own link: 'If the socket sockfd is of type SOCK_DGRAM then addr is the address to which datagrams are sent by default' Clearly this implied the function works for multiple protocols. Your difference, begging or otherwise is because you don't understand the concept and further rebuttal is not necessary unless you can indicate such. How is a server process crash report-able? how is a network timeout always report-able? What about if your Wifi Coverage lapses? You obviously have no idea what your talking about to begin to beg to differ :)
Mar
20
accepted Calculating the size of utilized Socket Options
Mar
18
comment Detecting TCP Client Disconnect
Only if you consider walking out of wifi service abnormal... or excess signal noise, data collisions or otherwise normal example.
Mar
18
comment Detecting TCP Client Disconnect
Should note that reset can also happen under certain normal conditions and doesn't necessarily mean the other party is no longer listening. Should also note that just because you time out receiving doesn't mean the other party isn't listening anymore either.
Mar
18
answered Detecting TCP Client Disconnect
Feb
28
comment Calculating the size of utilized Socket Options
yea there is, one used for tcp. Yea don't fragment is a different bit but its still an option. You already edited my question enough why don't you just continue to do do at your leisure?
Feb
28
comment Calculating the size of utilized Socket Options
yea, im confused. your the one who thinks the ip header is fixed size..... don't get mad just because your not as informed as you should be with an attitude like that. Its lame.
Feb
28
answered Calculating the size of utilized Socket Options
Feb
28
revised Calculating the size of utilized Socket Options
added 354 characters in body
Feb
27
revised Calculating the size of utilized Socket Options
added 236 characters in body
Feb
27
comment Calculating the size of utilized Socket Options
Not really, udp also is part of the question. And in tcp im talking about options which may be present after the handshake. Obviously if I missed the handshake I cant go back in time to get it. Thanks though.
Feb
27
revised Calculating the size of utilized Socket Options
added 373 characters in body
Feb
27
comment Calculating the size of utilized Socket Options
Don't worry why I need it, answer the question or don't. And answer correctly if you want credit. GetSockOpts is not a solution I can use which is better than what I am already doing. If you want to imagine a reason how about not causing unnecessary fragmentation caused by the same ''misconceptions' you apparently have.
Feb
27
comment Calculating the size of utilized Socket Options
This isn't your question is it? But the answer to that is os specific none the less, for instance 'netstat' will get you the process id, where you boldly go from there is up to you. Lastly so what if the header is fixed size and has options? Don't you mean it has a maximum fixed size buddy? (Of 60 bytes)
Feb
26
revised Calculating the size of utilized Socket Options
added 166 characters in body