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seen Feb 21 '13 at 14:37

Apr
20
accepted Fast way to “backup” (copy) large STL vector of custom objects
Apr
20
comment Fast way to “backup” (copy) large STL vector of custom objects
@jalf, @Kiril: While I know the total size of my vector beforehand, the number of items that are actually changed (and thus require backup) varies a lot. I could try to estimate it but this would be very rough and for some reason list appears to be faster anyhow (see above). It's a physics simulation program btw.
Apr
20
comment Fast way to “backup” (copy) large STL vector of custom objects
@jalf, @Kiril: Ok, I've done some simple unit tests. First of all: The partial backup scheme really saves lots of time (will in reality of course depend on the ratio of #<unchanged items> / #<total items>). Thanks! Using std::list as backup container instead of std::vector is roughly 30% faster in my tests. Oddly enough,this is also the case when I reserve the vector capacity beforehand. Moreover there is a significant difference in the distribution of resource usage. vector: User time: 128.5, System time: 21.85 list: User time: 95.6, System time: 0.18 (measured by gnu time)
Apr
20
awarded  Commentator
Apr
20
awarded  Supporter
Apr
20
comment Fast way to “backup” (copy) large STL vector of custom objects
Yes, you're right. I've already considered using swap for the restore part. However, in my specific case the backup needs to be restored only in a small fraction of all iterations. Thus the critical part really is the creation of the backup copy..
Apr
20
comment Fast way to “backup” (copy) large STL vector of custom objects
No, within the loop there is no delete or insert going on. So your solution should work. And yes, std::list would clearly be more appropriate than std::vector in this case. I'll report...
Apr
20
comment Fast way to “backup” (copy) large STL vector of custom objects
The size of the vectors is actually fixed within the while-loop (I forgot to mention this). So your suggestion using a container together with a std::pair actually sounds quite appealing and somewhat more elegant than my "additional index list" idea. I'll give it a shot.
Apr
20
asked Fast way to “backup” (copy) large STL vector of custom objects
Jan
6
revised Boost include headers not found using cmake
Found the solution myself..
Jan
6
comment Boost include headers not found using cmake
Oh damn. Nevermind, I found it.. See my edit above.
Jan
6
asked Boost include headers not found using cmake
Dec
31
awarded  Scholar
Dec
31
accepted Mathematica: How to apply function to a certain column of a table
Dec
31
comment Mathematica: How to apply function to a certain column of a table
Yeah, that works. Thanks! I was missing the nested map ( /@ ) inside the MapAt in my own attempts. BTW: If one is just after a multiplication of, say, column 2 of 3 total, a matrix multiplication A.DiagonalMatrix[{1,s,1}] will also do the trick. But your solution is way more elegant and flexible.
Dec
31
asked Mathematica: How to apply function to a certain column of a table
Dec
30
comment Boost multiarray does not compile. boost::concepts problem
No, unfortunately defining BOOST_NO_CONCEPTS doesn't solve the problem. Though from the documentation I would have also guessed that it should. To me this looks like some serious regression, I'll try browsing the bug reports some more..
Dec
30
awarded  Editor
Dec
30
comment Boost multiarray does not compile. boost::concepts problem
I've added an example. See above..
Dec
30
revised Boost multiarray does not compile. boost::concepts problem
added 700 characters in body