1,624 reputation
914
bio website blogs.msdn.com/ashleyf
location Redmond, WA
age 42
visits member for 4 years
seen Jul 25 at 22:10

Feb
27
answered Functions vs methods
Jan
25
comment Could a concatenative language use prefix notation?
Yes, or another approach is to keep fixed-arity but allow collections as an argument type (with delimiting syntax for those). Joy, for example, does this with square-bracketed lists (and quotations) and curly-braced sets, but no delimiters for arguments.
Jan
15
answered Forth syntax highlighting for Sublime Text 2?
Nov
23
answered Postfix Calculator
Nov
10
comment F# on the Microsoft Surface RT tablet
Exactly. I took my HP-35 microcode level emulator (in F# - blogs.msdn.com/b/ashleyf/archive/2012/01/26/…) and, with the IL patch mentioned above, got it into the app store (look for RetroCalc). Works great on Surface RT.
Oct
25
comment Scala flatten List
This is a fun as an exercise. For real code, of course, there is a flatten method on List.
Oct
24
revised Understanding currying by example
edited body
Oct
24
answered Understanding currying by example
Oct
9
revised Examples of very concise Forth applications?
added 568 characters in body
Oct
9
comment Examples of very concise Forth applications?
For a real taste of crazy-concise Forth code, take a look at Chuck Moore's own code! Download the GreenArrays tools (greenarraychips.com/home/support/download-02a.html) and look browse the source blocks (either in their editor, or in the EVB001-02a.html file).
Oct
9
answered Examples of very concise Forth applications?
Oct
2
comment Functional Programming - Lots of emphasis on recursion, why?
Ah, yes. I think I see your point about when I say, Map is implemented "...with recursion of course!". Not necessarily true. Not knowing J, I relate your example to F#: You can say [0..4] and get [0; 1; 2; 3; 4] or say List.map ((+) 1) [0..4] and get [1; 2; 3; 4; 5]. Under the hood List.map may use mutation as it sees fit. Indeed, it's all loads/stores at some point. The nice thing is to leave that kink of approach up to the compiler and library authors. We got away from goto years ago (though it's all branches at some point). Now let's get away from load and store.
Oct
1
comment Functional Programming - Lots of emphasis on recursion, why?
The point was that expressing iterative processes without using mutation requires expressing them recursively. Expressing without explicit loops is easy (e.g. the Map example mentioned).
Sep
30
answered What's the lifetime of S“ …” in Forth?
Sep
30
revised Functional Programming - Lots of emphasis on recursion, why?
added 193 characters in body
Sep
30
answered Functional Programming - Lots of emphasis on recursion, why?
Sep
30
awarded  Enthusiast
Sep
23
comment Why does Forth use IF statement THEN … instead of ENDIF?
Oh, and IF pushes the immediately following address to the return stack before calling into one or the other quotation (just a normal call) so that, upon RETURN, execution resumes after the IF.
Sep
23
comment Why does Forth use IF statement THEN … instead of ENDIF?
I don't know the particulars of your Forth but, in mine for example, true [ 10 ] [ 20 ] if compiles to bytecode LIT -1 QUOTE 3 LIT 10 RETURN QUOTE 3 LIT 20 RETURN IF. The LIT instruction pushes its operand as a literal. QUOTE pushes the address following its operand and jumps over n-bytes (3 in this case). So, when IF is reached, there is a -1 and two addresses on the stack. if consumes all three of these values and calls one or the other address depending on the boolean (BTW, I use -1 for true so that there's no difference between logical and bitwise and, or, not...)
Sep
22
revised Why does Forth use IF statement THEN … instead of ENDIF?
added 76 characters in body; added 23 characters in body