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bio website blogs.msdn.com/ashleyf
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Sep
22
revised Why does Forth use IF statement THEN … instead of ENDIF?
added 76 characters in body; added 23 characters in body
Sep
22
revised Why does Forth use IF statement THEN … instead of ENDIF?
added 76 characters in body
Sep
22
answered Why does Forth use IF statement THEN … instead of ENDIF?
Sep
13
answered Why use a stack-oriented language?
Sep
4
answered Concatenative languages and concurrency - is there a difficulty in principle?
Sep
4
comment Could a concatenative language use prefix notation?
I do see the problem you point out with non-commutative ops, trying to keep args in infix order. Your 3 2 - would become - 2 3, but still mean 3 - 2 to keep the "concatenative" properties. Again though, it's just a human convention to think in infix. In early grade school kids write the 3 above the 2 with the - to the left. Maybe they would be comfortable with prefix if they hadn't later had infix drilled into them. Another aside: Chuck Moore in his colorForth actually chose to reverse the order for subtraction with 2 3 - meaning 3 - 2. Now that's just crazy, but hey, why not? :)
Sep
4
awarded  Commentator
Sep
4
comment Could a concatenative language use prefix notation?
...not even to arguments. So postfix is nice. But I think it's just a preference that makes no essential difference. Maybe both the machine and I should just read "backwards" :)
Sep
4
comment Could a concatenative language use prefix notation?
As for trade offs: I believe that with fixed-arity words, prefix and postfix are exactly equivalent as far as the machine cares. You can literally just flip things around or execute in reverse. The humans may care, depending on whether they're a top-down or a bottom-up kind of person :) Some people like to see "if x do y" for example while others prefer "do y when x".I personally like having no forward references
Sep
3
answered Could a concatenative language use prefix notation?
Sep
2
comment How to divide two integers and get a result in float in Forth?
I liked this little bit on Forth-style rational arithmetic by Chuck Moore: colorforth.com/pi.htm
Sep
2
comment How to divide two integers and get a result in float in Forth?
Excellent secondary answer. Yes, try not to use floats at all.
Sep
2
comment Forth: free video tutorials?
Here's one on direct threading in TransForth: youtube.com/watch?v=vmjo6gesmUk
Sep
1
comment Functional Programming, recursing a game state loop
Yes, certainly you can do a branch rather than a call for simple (non-mutual) recursion. It's when you want to do a call and eliminate the stack frame that you're out of luck with the JVM.
Aug
22
answered Functional Programming, recursing a game state loop
Aug
9
answered How to implement LOOP in a FORTH-like language interpreter written in C
Jul
25
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
15
awarded  Yearling
Apr
30
answered Do concepts like Map and Reduce apply to all Functional Programming Languages?
Apr
30
comment Do concepts like Map and Reduce apply to all Functional Programming Languages?
RE "With C# I can implement Map & Reduce but the code gets quite hairy..." LINQ is FP embedded nicely in C# for all IEnumerables. Map is just Select, Reduce is Agregate, Filter is Where, ...