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Mar
23
revised git branch, fork, fetch, merge, rebase and clone, what are the differences?
deleted 1 characters in body
Mar
23
comment Combining Dictionary<A,B> + Dictionary<B,C> to create Dictionary<A,C>
+1 I like this one the best because it actually deals with the case where dic2 is missing keys for values in dic1.
Mar
22
answered git, how to deal with branches where code is executing
Mar
18
comment string object in c++
Keep reading about objects and it'll all be cleared up.
Mar
16
comment how to call a .cs file from main form in csharp
Reading a few tutorials, intros, books on C# should answer your question. You don't "call" .cs files. I think you need to develop a basic understanding of programming and .NET first.
Mar
15
comment A type for Date only in C# - why is there no Date type?
@Carlo V. Dango: I disagree. I think it's exactly what you wanted.
Mar
15
comment A type for Date only in C# - why is there no Date type?
I should also add that I think the "everything starts at -100 points" is a good way to make a piss-poor framework and this may be one of the things that got caught up in that garbage.
Mar
15
comment A type for Date only in C# - why is there no Date type?
I don't think I worded it well. I don't actually have much of a problem with it, per se, although I could see how having two or three types would be more appropriate from an abstraction/elegance point of view. My point really was that there are a lot of things in the .NET framework that may leave you scratching your head and it's not worth getting too upset about, especially considering that this "issue" is pretty minor compared to some egregious design decisions (generic constraints).
Mar
15
answered A type for Date only in C# - why is there no Date type?
Mar
9
comment C# Arithmetic Question
@Miguel: I don't think you need to -1. You made an honest mistake. The question's been answered and that's that.
Feb
28
comment Cast using Reflection in C#
If there is no common base type, then just use an unconstrained generic parameter. Don't use reflection when you don't have to.
Feb
28
comment Cast using Reflection in C#
I can't for the life of me fathom how you could have a list of something and not be able to use generics from bottom to top. I think you need to rethink why you need to do the code in part II.
Feb
28
comment Cast using Reflection in C#
@mnield you didn't make it clear where that code lives, which is why I asked my first question.
Feb
28
comment Cast using Reflection in C#
@mnield well then I fail to see what the problem is. You already know the type of the list, which is int. No need for reflection solutions.
Feb
28
comment Cast using Reflection in C#
Is the code in the second box intended to be inside a generic function, or are you planning to actually pass around an instance of Type?
Feb
21
comment C#: Generic Inherited Factories
@Mike: it's a kind of CRTP (Curiously Recurring Template Pattern). The base class does all the work and the type information is passed along via inheritance from more specific child classes. Eric Lippert is against it, but I disagree with his stance and reasoning.
Feb
21
comment C#: Generic Inherited Factories
@Kobi: It does compile. I do this kind of thing all the time in generic inheritance hierarchies.
Feb
14
comment Dynamically import C# classes from other directories
What do you mean "invoke those classes"?
Feb
12
comment Create a forms application with Visual Studio without CLR/.NET
@Ben Voigt: That function is pretty similar to select()/poll() on Unix systems. But one good function does not make for an elegant API.
Feb
12
comment Create a forms application with Visual Studio without CLR/.NET
@Ben Voigt: disagree strongly. It has stood the test of time, but not due to elegance in any way, shape or form.