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1d
comment Forcing a move for an implemented `Copy` type
@Shepmaster To be fair, most of the comments discuss stuff only tangentially related to the question. With the edit, the question is perfectly clear IMHO.
1d
comment Forcing a move for an implemented `Copy` type
@jocull Implicit references are evil, or at any rate not cool as far as Rust is concerned. And with all the indirection, I don't think that would usually be faster (and besides, you can opt into indirection with pointers). The reason you don't want to implement Copy is because it is dead wrong. Imagine this: you Copy a Vec, and then the original Vec (which still contains the same pointer, which is now also in your second Vec) is dropped, so that the contents of the Vec are freed.
1d
comment Forcing a move for an implemented `Copy` type
@jocull Well how are you supposed to move it except by taking it and putting it somewhere else? That's how the hardware works. Note though that this is a shallow memcpy: For example, a Vec is a struct containing a pointer and two integers, moving a Vec (or copying, if that were legal) only copies those 12 or 24 bytes, not any of the stuff the pointer points at.
1d
comment Forcing a move for an implemented `Copy` type
There is no difference between a move and a copy, except that after a move you can't use the source any more. Both are implemented as a shallow memcpy and "copy" the same things. What do you hope to achieve by having a "move" instead of a copy?
1d
comment What is the best way to implement a Rust enum in C#?
However, this does not allow changing the state of an object after its creation. You can create a new one, of course, but the identity is lost. The alternative is wrapping it all up in a class that simply stores a MyState, though that gets wordy.
2d
comment How do I merge a list of dicts into a single dict?
@JaredScott Thanks, edited in.
2d
revised How do I merge a list of dicts into a single dict?
deleted 48 characters in body
2d
reviewed Approve Documentation to understand mm part of Linux kernel?
2d
comment How should I spawn threads for parallel computation?
That doesn't necessarily mean you can't parallelize at all, you just have to spawn fewer threads and give each thread more work to do.
Jun
29
comment How should I spawn threads for parallel computation?
How many items are there, i.e., how long does each some_item_worker take? Spawning a thread and waiting for it to finish takes time. If each thread only does a very small amount of work, spawning tons of them can easily degrade performance.
Jun
29
comment Why should I ever use “getattr()”?
Your understanding is not quite correct, getattr(object, "method") is equivalent to object.method (no method call). You can of course call the method using getattr but that's spelled getattr(object, "mehod")(). This is inconsequential to your question though.
Jun
27
comment Casting away lifetime constraints?
Are you talking about things like Box<Any + 'static>? Those only make sense for trait objects. Or do you mean bounds such as fn no_borrows<T: 'static>(x: T) -> T { x }?
Jun
27
comment When do I need to specify lifetimes
An even simpler example where lifetime elision fails is fn pick_one(a: &T, b: &T) -> &T (even if it always returns one of them unconditionally).
Jun
26
revised How to stop memory leaks when using `as_ptr()`?
added 72 characters in body
Jun
26
comment How to stop memory leaks when using `as_ptr()`?
@ChrisMorgan This is undocumented though, and unlike struct Box<T>(*mut T) it is not obvious that this will never change. Therefore I'm weary to recommend it, especially since a stable into_ptr/from_ptr is probably only two releases away.
Jun
26
answered How to stop memory leaks when using `as_ptr()`?
Jun
22
comment Idiomatic borrowing
@Shepmaster Code Review is for code that already works. This doesn't compile.
Jun
16
comment Lifetime of a mutable element in struct
Read the answer, you're going to need that knowledge in the future, but for this particular example you probably don't want a &mut Vec. Just store a Vec in User. The user object doesn't borrow and modify someone else's address list, each has its own address list and owns it.
Jun
14
answered Situations where Cell or RefCell is the best choice
Jun
14
awarded  Nice Answer