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4h
comment Modify struct field inside of Option
You need |mut s| { s.field1(5); s }. The method modifies the object but its return value, the &mut, is useless for returning by-value.
1d
comment Thread-safe mutable non-owning pointer in Rust?
See also: crates.io/crates/scoped_threadpool
2d
comment Rust Programming Language: Why does Rust bother with “let”?
More like blog posts, I suppose. Google finds plenty of support for the position in any case. It appears your line of work is simply very unusual.
Aug
25
comment Rust Programming Language: Why does Rust bother with “let”?
@user3728501 This is turning into a discussion that exceeds the scope of a comment chain (and Stack Overflow in general), so I'll refer you to Google to find some of the many essays arguing that "code is read more often than it is written". I have neither the time nor the space to reproduce all the arguments here.
Aug
24
comment Rust Programming Language: Why does Rust bother with “let”?
@user3728501 Of course writing needs to be possible. But we're talking about (what you perceive to be) a slight loss in write-ability, for a slight win in readability. The fact that it will be read more often than written makes this a good trade off. RE: Last comment: But we do add the colon, and it even has many additional benefits (as explained in this answer). So what's your point here? And again, consider that the by far most common variable declaration in Rust is let name = value; with no type mentioned.
Aug
24
comment Rust Programming Language: Why does Rust bother with “let”?
@user3728501 Regardless, we are now arguing about the thought process of the author when writing code. A more important point, to me, is whether it makes sense to the reader. Is "Here's the amount of space to allocate, as usize" really more sensibe, semantically, then "Here's some usize that stores the amount of space to allocate"?
Aug
24
comment Rust Programming Language: Why does Rust bother with “let”?
@user3728501 So you are opposed to type inference as well?
Aug
24
comment Rust Programming Language: Why does Rust bother with “let”?
I understand that. I just don't get how it might look like it. There is nothing indicating that. As you note, the only difference is the absence of let, what does that have to do with by-value/by-reference?
Aug
24
comment Rust Programming Language: Why does Rust bother with “let”?
I don't get your point of your edit. In a function signature, the context tells us that we're declaring parameters and not assigning anything. And how you get the impression that anything happens by-reference, without any & or other indicator, is beyond me.
Aug
24
comment Rust Programming Language: Why does Rust bother with “let”?
@user3728501 I know what my data looks like. Fortunately, in that I am not fully constrained by the machine and can think more abstractly: I can know that something is an integer without already making up my mind whether it's u32 or u64. I can know that I want to look up the users for all the user IDs without caring that the result type of items.iter().map(User::lookup) is iter::Map<slice::Iter<u32>, fn(u32) -> User>. And even if I need to know these things at some point, I don't need to know at all times and push it into the face of every reader.
Aug
24
revised Rust Programming Language: Why does Rust bother with “let”?
added 19 characters in body
Aug
24
answered Rust Programming Language: Why does Rust bother with “let”?
Aug
23
comment Convert vector of single integers into vector of single binary values
@Shepmaster The change I propose is not a very complicated one, though, and it easily saves a factor of eight in memory (and for many algorithms, the associated increase in cache hits will be pretty big as well).
Aug
23
comment Convert vector of single integers into vector of single binary values
A vector of bits is an awfully inefficient representation. Consider writing accessor methods that operate on your Vec<u32> (or whatever), accessing and setting individual bits of the digits. That assumes your digits are bundles of bits rather than decimal digits, but honestly there is rarely a good reason to not do that.
Aug
18
comment Why do we use templates instead of functions?
@zxq9 Ya think this is helpful for someone who would ask a question like this?
Aug
16
comment Do most compilers transform % 2 into bit comparison? Is it really faster?
If there is a difference in the result, the compiler is not allowed to make that change. Unless explicitly allowed (and this is a rarity), optimizations must not change the observable behavior of programs. Of course, if there is no difference, it can optimized, but it can't both make a difference and be done by the optimiizer.
Aug
16
comment Do most compilers transform % 2 into bit comparison? Is it really faster?
That is a different statement than what you wrote. I know it's optimized. It is optimized because the modulo operation is not more efficient. You also contradict yourself: If the bitwise operation is not correct for negative numbers (which might actually be correct in C and C++, I don't know how they define bitwise operations for negative numbers) then surely the compiler can't optimize that?
Aug
16
comment Do most compilers transform % 2 into bit comparison? Is it really faster?
The speed is equivalent? The division/modulus instruction generally takes a few dozen cycles while the bitwise operation takes one. The bitwise operation does work for negative numbers if two's complement is used. Zero is also handled correctly: (0 & 1) == 0 and zero is even.
Aug
16
comment From an application programmer's perspective - Can Functional Programming be used to program Quantum Computers?
@Strilanc I get the impression that OP hopes they could program in their favorite functional programming language and harness quantum computing magic without having to learn anything new. I answered that. The aspects that you mention seem extremely hard to answer to me, since research on that issue has only just started. In any case, I cannot comment on it.
Aug
16
comment &self move field containing Box - Move out of borrowed content
@MathieuDavid Then the users need to supply a way to duplicate their helpers, or you need to change your design so that they can use one instance of your object for multiple renders.