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comment Is there any good example to show “use global mutable variable makes functions hard to reason about”
Global variables are eschewed even by imperative programming communities that have zero problems with mutability and don't care about referential transparency or purity.
1d
awarded  Nice Answer
1d
answered Return reference with lifetime of self
2d
awarded  Enlightened
2d
comment The order of multiplications
@arammis Yes, you're talking about the order of parentheses. But if the operation is associative, the order does not matter (i.e., a * (b * c) is the same as (a * b) * c), therefore matrices are a bad example for why this order matters.
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comment The order of multiplications
@arammis Matrix multiplication is associative though.
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comment The order of multiplications
@Jon The relevant property is associativity, not commutativity. And school arithmetic is not immediately applicable here: int types are not the integers we use in mathematics, all operations are modulo 2^N. It just so happens that this doesn't damage the associativity for unsigned types, but signed integer overflow is undefined behavior and float multiplication isn't associative (neither is addition).
Jul
25
comment How do I decide when to mark a trait as unsafe?
@ker Send and Sync don't even have any methods that the implementer could need unsafe for, nor do the methods of Searcher seem unsafe-requiring to me. And unsafe is never about "easy to get wrong", only about memory safety.
Jul
22
comment How does Rust know which types own resources?
Note that the set of primitive types also includes raw pointers * mut T and * const T, which are used in the implementation of Box and Vec and other container types. If not for the Drop impl, Box and Vec could totally be Copy - it would just be unsafe and semantically wrong.
Jul
22
comment How to check if a function is pure in Python?
You could perhaps rule out some obvious problems, but every nontrivial function calls dozens of methods, __dunder__ methods, and other functions. Each and every one of those calls can do anything at all, from modifying virtually any object up to and including changing what functions will be called on the next line. An incomplete black list is the best you'll be able to do, but that can also be done statically by a linter, no need for run time validation.
Jul
22
comment How does Rust know which types own resources?
@jco In a sense, the concept of ownership is baked in the language, but as a general mechanism which knows nothing about specific types and is leveraged in various ways by various library types. Sadly I don't have a good and short explanation at hand either.
Jul
22
comment How does Rust know which types own resources?
I don't have the time to write a full answer now, I just want to mention that Box is not special or hardcoded. (Well, currently some aspects are, but none of those have anything to do with this question, and they're only hardcoded because the language features to express these things in pure library code aren't finished yet.) Ownership for Box works exactly as ownership for Vec.
Jul
20
comment Should I favour static methods where possible?
But that low level difference is completely irrelevant in 99% of circumstances (and I say this while I poke through assembly to squeeze out a few nanoseconds from a function), while the high level differences are very relevant. That's why I'm complaining about your priorities rather than saying you're wrong. You're not technically wrong, but you're correct about the by far least important aspect of the whole question.
Jul
20
comment Should I favour static methods where possible?
There is a realm of semantic differences, starting from in what circumstances the method can be called, to which operations can be made static, to what the static-ness of the method implies to the human, and you choose to focus entirely on one tiny insignificant micro optimization? Please get your priorities straight.
Jul
19
comment Why is it possible to implement Read on an immutable reference to File?
Does the answer to Why can I call File.take() on a reference? resolve this or are you asking why Read is implemented on &File?
Jul
19
answered Why can I call File.take() on a reference?
Jul
19
awarded  Yearling
Jul
18
revised Rust generics: Expected <T> found <Foo>
added 494 characters in body
Jul
18
comment Rust generics: Expected <T> found <Foo>
@MathieuDavid If you want to be able to have a MDBook object and change dynamically what renderer it uses, then generics are the wrong tool (though traits are good for that too). I've edited the answer to cover that as well.
Jul
18
comment Rust generics: Expected <T> found <Foo>
@MathieuDavid You can have a method that returns MDBook<HtmlHandlebars>, though it would be more appropriate to put that into an impl MDBook<HtmlHandlebars> {} block. However, if you don't have some other methods that do work with MDBook<R> for all R, then the generic is pointless. Also the name would have to be different, since there is no overloading here. Perhaps ask yourself why you want to make a special case for this default.