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Jun
23
comment Where will Python be logging errors for me (moving from PHP)
I'm not a web dev guy, but about errors in Python in general: Python doesn't have what PHP calls errors, it has exceptions. Python will never silence one of those, unless of course there's a try around the code that caused it with an except clause that matches the exception raised and the code under except doesn't re-raise it. Execution stops completely (of course not the whole web server, propably just the request handler) when an exception is left unhandled. When that happens, it also gives a traceback by default, although I'd expect most web frameworks to change that.
Jun
23
comment Learning about lexical scanning and parsing from the ground up
He's trying to learn how parsers and tokenizers work. You point him to the source code of a parser and tokenizer generator. That's like explaining the machines at a car factory's assembly line when asked about the inner workings of a car.
Jun
23
comment Learning about lexical scanning and parsing from the ground up
@Chaos: I know very well that parsers can (and often are, if the authors are sane) be written elegantly. I was talking about tokenizers, which are an entirely different matter.
Jun
23
comment Learning about lexical scanning and parsing from the ground up
Hand-written lexers are just very ugly and verbose implementations of the regular expressions that form the lexmes, with some boilerplate code for (among other things) storing the matched strings, perhaps converting integer literals from strings.Chances are you'll never have to write one yourself, so apart from the gritty implementation details of the actual matching, there's nothing to be learnt from them compared to a tokenizer using lex.
Jun
23
comment How to filter out warning info
This will swallow all output to the file being redirected, and leave it silenced if an exception occurs.
Jun
23
comment Which Licence To Use For FOSS?
It's still an additional requirement to fulfill when re-distributing. But again, I'm not really sure on this one. Perhaps it's perfectly legal. Either way, it's a burden for people who want to e.g. bundle it with their application, package it, etc. - likely not welcome and I don't see the slightest reason for it.
Jun
23
comment How do you make python recognize read a precompiled shared file?
distutils exists specifically because it can a huge hassle to do by yourself (see python-history.blogspot.com/2009/03/…) - is building it with distutils (possibly twice, if it's also needed in the cmake build) completely out of question?
Jun
23
comment Which Licence To Use For FOSS?
I do not want it to be possible for someone else to take it and sell/re-release it without notifying me - I don't think any existing (especially not widely-used) FOSS licence supports that, and I'm not sure if it would even conform with the free software principles. And the acknowledgement requirement sounds like §3 in the original DSB licence, which has since caused lots of trouble. Reconsider these requirements. Just go with one of the existing licenses.
Jun
23
comment Modifying a single line in a file
Step back from Python and think about how files are stored (conceptually, ignoring fragmentation and file system details) - as a continuous array of bytes. In this model, to ass or remove something in the middle means moving all bytes that come afterwards. There may be a way to hide this in your Python code, but it will still happen under the hood. Especially since it sounds you'll have to check each line to know if and how you want to modify it.
Jun
23
comment One-liner possible?
This is a horrible way to output HTML. For instance, it breaks as soon as u contains double quotes or ampersands or angle brackets. Use a templating system, or at least add some basic validation/escaping for these obvious problems.
Jun
23
revised Python equivalence to inline functions or macros
added 17 characters in body
Jun
22
answered Python equivalence to inline functions or macros
Jun
22
comment Python equivalence to inline functions or macros
In addition the the very correct and important (seriously, listen to them), note that due to the dynamic nature of Python, the only time inlining could possible happen is at runtime. This is one of the many optimizations PyPy does (although it doesn't have a remotely complete NumPy yet; but at least it's being worked on), and PyPy works best on idiomatic Python code, not on code written to shave off tiny bits of time off execution overhead.
Jun
22
comment Python equivalence to inline functions or macros
... which is a horrible idea, a lot of extra work and a decent chance of obscure breakage for nearly zero practical gain.
Jun
22
comment Php function names paired with classes
Try write three ugly names to safe four characters and confuse the heck out of people writing the code ("What's that function doing in addition to new?")? Edit @Joe: Last time I checked, new for class instanciaton was required for quite a few languages. There are many things one can critisize about the design of PHP, but this isn't one of the significant ones.
Jun
21
comment Can I do math inside Python's string formatting “language”?
Um, do it outside of the string?
Jun
21
comment self parameter and metaprogramming
@Kiril: Of course you can, if you don't mind getting into descriptors - see other answers. Note however that you can also have extra state with closures (just add local variables to wrapper and use them in _wrapped_meth) - it only gets impractical when you need additional methods.
Jun
21
comment self parameter and metaprogramming
The closure isn't the only ingredient. You only get self becaues the class recognized wrapper as a method and generates an instance method descriptor for it.
Jun
21
comment “ImportError: No module named Tkinter” even though I've used Tkinter programs as recent as yesterday and no substantial changes were made?
@unutbu: That would lead to AttributeError, not ImportError.
Jun
21
comment Jython- using variables in function calls syntax
Wait, wat? If you put it in quotes, it's a string literal. If you don't, it refers to a variable. If you want to refer to a variable, leave out the quotes. Say, why do you want to "retain quotes"?