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May
19
comment How much time the fastest supercomputer will take to run this code?
A couple of points: To actually use all of those PFLOPS, the problem has to be massively parallel. I think one can keep the core idea of the algorithm while distributing the work but the code in the question won't use more than a single core of a single multi-core CPU out of ten thousands. Additionally, even if you do parallelize, each recursive step will include at least five to ten bookkeeping instructions (save registers, call function, set up stack frame, restore registers, return). And the 33 PFLOPS is a peak figure, reaching it requires using all SIMD lanes which this code won't.
May
17
awarded  Nice Answer
May
17
revised Advantages and drawbacks to implimenting core methods of a scripting language in the underlying language
deleted 90 characters in body
May
17
answered Advantages and drawbacks to implimenting core methods of a scripting language in the underlying language
May
17
comment Lua Virtual Machine Register size
@TM90 The register will contain the pointer, but the operation will usually act on the object it points to, not on the pointer.
May
17
answered Lua Virtual Machine Register size
May
15
awarded  Nice Answer
May
14
awarded  Nice Answer
May
13
comment Why are we using linked list to address collisions in hash tables?
For more than one element, you start actually saving space and get more cache hits. Anyway, my point is not that arrays are better for buckets (I'm not sure of that) but that linked lists don't have nearly as many advantages as you claim. The code isn't much more complex either, though the design is arguable a bit more complex.
May
13
comment Why are we using linked list to address collisions in hash tables?
Linked lists are not smaller if one is clever with the arrays. Don't over-allocate for small array. A one-element array is then simply length + element, exactly as large as the linked list node (next pointer + element). A two element list is already more efficient. An empty array is equally small: If you always allocate the array externally, just store a null pointer in the hash table as you would for the linked list. If you want to inline the first node of the list, the equivalent for arrays is storing (length, first_element) if length = 1 and (length, pointer) otherwise. Again, same size.
May
13
comment Why are we using linked list to address collisions in hash tables?
Python doesn't use linked lists, or any buckets at all. It uses open addressing.
May
11
comment Why can't a negative normalized floating point binary number start with 11?
Together with your examples, I think I understand the format now. Unfortunately I don't see how it could be that negative normalized numbers can't start with 10. Have you asked the teachers?
May
11
comment Why can't a negative normalized floating point binary number start with 11?
What's the exact floating point format? It can't be IEEE 754 (doesn't use two's complement and doesn't specify 10 bit formats), so please explain which bits encode which values (sign, exponent, significand) and how (sign/magnitude vs two's complement, offset-bias vs two's complement, etc.).
May
11
comment How to create a DST type?
This thing is different enough from everything in the standard library (that I know of) that implementing it manually, with unsafe code, is probably the easiest, most reliable, and all around best option. It most likely won't fit into the existing DST scheme or into Box.
May
11
revised Mutable structs in a vector
edited body
May
10
comment Mutating the same data in multiple 'static closures
@thelink2012 Rc<RefCell<_>> (or plain Rc<_>) is/should be only used when it's necessary. And if it's necessary, well... you probably can't avoid the allocation anyway, or not easily. Rust allows you to avoid allocations and other expensive things, you still have the responsibility to decide if it's worth it.
May
10
comment Mutating the same data in multiple 'static closures
@thelink2012 I think I addressed that now.
May
10
revised Mutating the same data in multiple 'static closures
edited body
May
10
revised Mutating the same data in multiple 'static closures
edited body
May
10
revised Mutating the same data in multiple 'static closures
edited body