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Sep
6
comment Algorithmic complexity of checking if an element exists in an array
@LukaHorvat The last paragraph touches on the underlying theory. Problems come in shades of hardness: How much of some resource must be spent to solve an instance of the problem? This is not a strict order: Many problems are equally hard, even if one (where, if anywhere, is this value in this array?) is more general than the other (does this value occur in this array?). Each of those problems can be proven to have some specific complexity, and the proof goes almost identically for the two problems. Seeing as there are such proofs, your question isn't really open ended.
Sep
6
comment License compatibility with GPL'd DLL downloaded at runtime?
That part quite clearly says that complex interaction (mutual function calls, shared data structures and such) make plugin and host part of the same program (and hence all-or-nothing w.r.t. GPL). A database driver seems to fall under quite clearly. Even if you'd only "[invoke] the ‘main’ function of the plug-in with some options and [wait] for it to return" for main=mysql_something it would still be at best a "borderline case", and it's quite questionable whether you can convince anyone that this is the case.
Sep
6
comment License compatibility with GPL'd DLL downloaded at runtime?
That link seems to address the opposite situation (here, the "system library" is GPL; the FSF talks about your application being GPL and the system library being non-free).
Sep
6
comment License compatibility with GPL'd DLL downloaded at runtime?
I think you may be confusing the GPL with the LGPL. AFAIK only the latter makes concessions for dynamic linking and such.
Sep
4
comment Count number of operations in algorithm
The complexity is O(1). There's no n in sight, or any variable for that matter.
Aug
31
comment Why should I mark all methods virtual in C++? Is there a trade-off?
All the reasons given in the accepted answer to that other question are language agnostic, i.e. they apply to C++ just as much as to C#.
Aug
31
comment Why should I mark all methods virtual in C++? Is there a trade-off?
The principle you mention is one of language design and it's more accurately stated as "don't pay for what you don't use". A programmer may still decide to always use some feature; this answer doesn't give a strong reason to not use virtual functions IMHO.
Aug
31
answered Why should I mark all methods virtual in C++? Is there a trade-off?
Aug
31
comment Why is “not” faster than “bool()” in Python (or, speed of Python functions vs. statements)?
@SethMMorton Note however that the mean of the times is not necessarily meaningful. The minimum may do a better job of removing noise.
Aug
31
comment Why is “not” faster than “bool()” in Python (or, speed of Python functions vs. statements)?
(1) bool and the __bool__ methods of the types tested here are written in C, so no Python frame is created, only a C function call which is dirt cheap (in the order of nanoseconds). (2) not also has to call the __bool__ method, so it's one call vs two calls, not no calls vs one call.
Aug
31
comment set methods in Python, are they necessary?
Such typos can also be caught without making all accesses more ugly and verbose. For example via __slots__ or a linter.
Aug
31
comment set methods in Python, are they necessary?
Encapsulation and information hiding can easily achieved through @property which has nicer syntax.
Aug
30
awarded  Disciplined
Aug
28
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
23
comment Java Operations that will return the original value
Welcome to the wonderful world of obfuscation. There is a market for automated bytecode obfuscation tools should you feel the need. Using one of those would probably be more effective and maintenance-friendly than manual obfuscation. However, be aware that nothing will stop determined reverse engineering when the program is accessible to the attacker (and sometimes even when not). Your security should be strong even when every detail of the algorithm and implementation are exposed.
Aug
23
comment Invalid operands to binary + (char*) and (char*)?
@GrzegorzSzpetkowski Thank you for finding that. So it's not actually permitted, just a stupid compiler extension.
Aug
23
comment Python 3.3: Convert XML to YAML
XML is far more flexible and general than YAML, meaning that a lot of XML doesn't have a natural YAML equivalent. If you want a nice mapping for a specific case where there is an equivalence, you'll have to define and implement it yourself.
Aug
23
comment Invalid operands to binary + (char*) and (char*)?
@JoachimPileborg I got that the first time around ;-) I was wondering why that implicit conversion might have been permitted in the first place, and still around (other relics of very-early-C are slowly being phased out).
Aug
23
comment Is making memory readable, writeable and executeable subject to any performance impact?
@KugBuBu Where does reflection enter the picture? Just generate a specialized type/method for the call A.B(C) at compile time. And if you need a A.B2(X, Y) call elsewhere, then generate another type/method for that.
Aug
23
comment Invalid operands to binary + (char*) and (char*)?
@JoachimPileborg Nonsense. An address may be a number to the hardware, but a pointer in C is a separate type from integers. Someone, somewhere allowed implicit conversions from integer types (or just integer constants?) to pointer types, which seems silly because such a conversion is almost never meaningful outside of 0, even though there is no problem with implementing it.