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visits member for 4 years, 5 months
seen Dec 21 at 20:49

Sep
7
comment How can I hide the axes in matplotlib 3d?
I see. It's good to know anyway; thanks.
Sep
7
comment How can I hide the axes in matplotlib 3d?
@Joe Klington: Out of curiosity, which of the two things I tried used to work? I'm wondering, because the first, axes.set_visible(), has the following help description: "Set the artist's visiblity." So it seems that it was always supposed to set the visibility of the graph, not the axes. As for the second, how did it work, when there was never a get_zaxis() method?
Aug
31
comment Automatically call common initialization code without creating __init__.py file
@agf: fixed, thanks.
Aug
31
comment Automatically call common initialization code without creating __init__.py file
@Simon: looks like you have the answer. Care to spell out what I need to do to "Hack the __init__.py"? :)
Aug
31
comment Automatically call common initialization code without creating __init__.py file
@Greg: The latter.
Jul
26
comment When opening 2 files in emacs, how can I have them appear side-by-side?
I originally chose one @huitseeker's answer for its simplicity, but it had one drawback. When emacs temporarily splits a window to show, for example, possible filename tab-completions, it would split the current window side-by-side. This is pretty horrible when the current window is only 80 chars long. Sean's answer splits windows side-by-side when you open multiple files on emacs launch, but otherwise lets emacs retain its usual behavior of opening temporary buffers by splitting the current window vertically.
Jul
17
comment No linker error when global variable declared static in the header file
@fvu I think we can assume that the real filename isn't x.h either.
Jul
14
comment When opening 2 files in emacs, how can I have them appear side-by-side?
See "EDIT" in question.
Jul
14
comment When opening 2 files in emacs, how can I have them appear side-by-side?
I know how to do it manually once emacs has launched; I just want emacs to use side-by-side splitting by default when opening multiple files. Editing question to clarify.
Jun
26
comment C++ and modularity: Where am I supposed to draw the line?
I like @jaif's link. It shows the consequences of overengineering the interfaces before writing any actual implementations. Not only does coding become markedly slower and less fun, the resulting interfaces are often crappy since they weren't built to solve actual, existing, factorization problems.
Jun
23
comment Do function calls within a function's argument list deepen the stack?
Why would being faster not matter?
Jun
15
comment How to get started with Lisp
@iamcreasy Dialects are more than just different implementations, they are different languages. They are similar enough to be seen as belonging to the same "family" of languages, but you generally can't take one dialect's code and run it with another dialect's parser. The most well-known dialects are Common Lisp, Scheme, and Clojure. Common Lisp has many implementations that can inter-operate (like JPython and IronPython). Scheme is more fragmented, with each implementation coming up with its own way of doing basic things like package management. I have no experience with Clojure.
Jun
4
comment Implementing a “Pythonic” map in Scheme: bad idea?
I've edited the question to remove the false assertion that r5rs' map disallows empty lists.
Jun
1
comment C++ STL: Using derived virtual class as “Strict Weak Ordering” for std::sort()
Why couldn't they overload std::sort with a version that takes the comparator as a reference? (I had to write my own).
May
25
comment Implementing a “Pythonic” map in Scheme: bad idea?
Whoops; true. I can't even remember where I got that idea from.
May
23
comment Implementing a “Pythonic” map in Scheme: bad idea?
@newacct I wanted map on a single empty list to behave like a Python list comprehension on an empty list. In other words, I wanted it to return an empty list, rather than to throw an error. For multiple lists, I wanted map to stop once the shortest list was depleted, like with Python's [f(x, y) for x, y in zip(x_list, y_list)]. As Eli points out, the srfi-1 version of map does both of these things, while the built-in (r5rs) version of map doesn't.
May
3
comment How to correctly initialize multidimentional char array and pass it to function?
@Alex: The line you refer to is called the initialization list. It's used to initialize member variables. What's going on is this: width_ is being initialized with width. The data_ vector is being initialized using the characters in the data string. "begin()" and "end()" return what are called iterators; think of them as pseudo-pointers that mark the beginning and end of the data string's data. For more on initialization lists, see: parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/ctors.html#faq-10.6
May
3
comment How to correctly initialize multidimentional char array and pass it to function?
@ildjam: Whoops; I always make that mistake. Corrected.
Apr
29
comment How to correctly initialize multidimentional char array and pass it to function?
@muntoo: Exactly. Just to spell it out for everybody: putting string literals next to each other without commas is equivalent to writing out one giant string. The constructor takes this const char* and implicitly converts it to a std::string, which can then be easily copied to the internal representation: a std::vector<char> with no need for null-termination characters.
Apr
29
comment How to correctly initialize multidimentional char array and pass it to function?
@lidjam: No I definitely meant operator(). Operator[] only allows one argument; we need two (i.e. row and column).