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Nov
30
comment scheme style guide
I guess I was hoping for something more navigable and scan-able than a raw .txt file. The Google style guide is great in this respect, which is why I am able to adhere to it and still feel like it's doing more good than harm to my coding experience.
Nov
18
comment What is a good way to debug haskell code?
Here's an updated quickcheck link; (www.cs -> www.cse): cse.chalmers.se/~rjmh/QuickCheck
Nov
9
comment What's the best way to trim std::string
Hmm; this assumes that the string has no internal whitespace (e.g. spaces). The OP only said he wanted to trim whitespace on the left or right.
Nov
9
comment SLAM Algorithm
Not only does OpenCV not have any SLAM functionality, you're assuming his SLAM front-end is visual. Not an implausible scenario, but laser scan-matching is more common.
Oct
13
comment How do I down-cast a c++ object from a python SWIG wrapper?
So strange... I tried writing something like your example, Chris, and indeed it worked. As you might expect, the code I'm actually having trouble with isn't some toy problem, I just toy-ified it to make it short enough to fit in a question. My current workaround is to define the CastToDerived function in my c++ library, instead of in an %inline %{ ... %} block in the .i file. That fixes the problem. Perhaps that detail might be a hint to the right person? I still wish I could do without adding SWIG helpers to my c++ library.
Oct
13
comment How do I down-cast a c++ object from a python SWIG wrapper?
That's not the problem, I think. The original CastToDerived took a const reference, and returned a const pointer, as you might suggest. I had the same error even then. SWIG takes all references and turns them into pointers, and drops constness. This is why my CastToDerived now takes and returns non-const pointers. Re: swig docs here: swig.org/Doc2.0/SWIGPlus.html#SWIGPlus_nn18 and here: swig.org/Doc2.0/SWIGPlus.html#SWIGPlus_const
Oct
1
comment Side-by-side institutes in latex beamer title page
Good enough for me! Thanks!
Sep
22
comment Detecting Ctrl-<Number> in GLUT
I've run into this issue too, on Ubuntu 9.10 (GNOME). I get key events for ctrl-1, but not ctrl-2, ctrl-3, others. What could be happening?
Sep
5
comment Downloadable STL documentation that covers TR1?
That's pretty much what I meant. I indeed use the standard STL, and have found the SGI STL docs to be useful as a reference. This should serve as a measure of the casualness of the original question. As in, I can deal with mapping hash_set to unordered_set in my head, and recognize that I run the risk of certain functions not mapping onto each other, though this hasn't happened to me yet in practice. So the SGI docs suffice for me, and if there exist TR1 docs of comparable accuracy (and as importantly, ease-of-use), I'd be happy.
Sep
5
comment Downloadable STL documentation that covers TR1?
Whoops, I forgot to specify that I've got a Linux machine, so I can't run the .exe-based installer used by this download. It's also a 2GB download... If I find a windows box, I may still try this, but I'm holding out for now for something more lightweight and cross-platform.
Sep
5
comment Downloadable STL documentation that covers TR1?
These comments puzzle me. Did I unwittingly imply that SGI STL == std::, or that tr1:: == std::? I'm just looking for downloadable tr1 docs, you guys.
Sep
5
comment Downloadable STL documentation that covers TR1?
Thanks; it's the only option so far, but I'm still looking for more of a quick reference in html rather than a monolithic spec in PDF.
Aug
20
comment Can I interpolate rotation from two Quaternions created from Yaw/Pitch/roll?
(cont'd from above) ... interpolating euler angles therefore does not necessarily take the shortest path from orientation a to orientation b, and indeed can take some pretty wild paths, unlike when interpolating quaternions using the SLERP algorithm.
Aug
20
comment Can I interpolate rotation from two Quaternions created from Yaw/Pitch/roll?
@codymanix: Interpolating euler angles and interpolating quaternions are intuitively very different operations. Interpolating quaternions is what you expect it to be: there is a minimal rotation q between two orientations a and b, such that a*q = b, and we increase the angle of q from zero to its original value as we interpolate, so we take the shortest path from a to b. When you interpolate euler angles you're doing something far weirder. You arbitrarily break q into three axis-aligned rotations (regardless of the orientations of a and b), and interpolate these component rotations instead.
Aug
17
comment How to interpolate rotations?
Uhuu, could you clarify what you mean by "rotating around multiple axes"? When you perform slerp between quaternions a and b, you rotate around one axis; the axis of the quaternion c, where c = b * a^-1
Aug
17
comment Flipping issue when interpolating Rotations using Quaternions
Normalization has nothing to do with this; both q and -q have the same magnitude. Normalizing only keeps q from scaling the object in addition to rotating it. I think Peter's interpretation of the question is correct. When slerping between two rotations q0 qnd q1, Dot(q0, q1) must be positive. If not, replace q1 with -q1.
Aug
17
comment Limit camera pitch
A is definitely the axis as a unit vector. Even if "position" was a typo, the answer would only work if Q was already just the pitch rotation, not the total camera rotation C. We're trying to extract Q from C.
Aug
14
comment How to find minimum of nonlinear, multivariate function using Newton's method (code not linear algebra)
I would strongly discourage this; it converges far slower than using Newton or conjugate gradients. Unless the "bowl" of the local minimum is spherical (i.e. has the same curvature along all 30 dimensions), the direction of the local gradient is likely to be very different from the direction from the current parameters to the minimum. Furthermore, there's a whole lot more guesswork in terms of stepsize when doing simple gradient descent.
Aug
14
comment Quaternions and Transform Matrices
I would say quaternions are much easier to visualize, since they give you the axis of rotation in the imaginary component. When visualizing the axis of rotation of a set of euler angles, I pretty much have to perform the three euler rotations in my head, then compare the final orientation of the object with the original orientation, and maybe then I can see the single axis it rotated around.
Aug
9
comment C++ coding standard for small group using modern IDEs
Yeah, the no-exceptions-rule is independent of the rest of the style rules, and one can take it or leave it, to taste. Same goes with boost; it's only banned because exceptions are. If you are ok with exceptions, you can use boost. The style guide does indeed help integrate with C code by having output arguments passed by pointer, but that's not it's raison d'etre. Its goal is to tame the feature sprawl that is c++, which can lead to inconsistent naming and argument passing conventions even within single-coder projects. The header guards and formatting things are just surface details.