132,720 reputation
22275410
bio website google.com/+JoachimSauer1
location Austria
age 33
visits member for 5 years, 8 months
seen 11 hours ago

I read code, I write code, I like code.


Jun
18
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
17
revised Singleton via enum way is lazy initialized?
deleted 1 character in body
Jun
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
13
comment When is the finalize() method called in Java?
@VikasVerma: the perfect replacement is nothing: you should not need them. The only case where it would make sense is if your class manages some external resource (like a TCP/IP connection, file ... anything that the Java GC can't handle). In those cases the Closable interface (and the idea behind it) is probably what you want: make .close() close/discard the resource and require the user of your class to call it at the right time. You might want to add a finalize method "just to be save", but that would be more of a debugging tool than an actual fix (because it's not reliable enough).
Jun
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
13
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
5
awarded  Guru
Jun
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
4
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
3
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
3
revised How do I define a method which takes a lambda as a parameter in Java 8?
present tense
Jun
3
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
3
awarded  Nice Answer
May
29
awarded  Nice Answer
May
28
awarded  Nice Answer
May
23
awarded  Enlightened
May
22
awarded  Nice Answer
May
22
comment Java: cast collection type to subtype
@pkk: A Foo<A> could mean two things: It accepts all A or it returns only A (or both, maybe even in the same method). For "it accepts all A" (as a method parameter, for example) your suggestion would hold. But for "it returns only A" it would not: a Foo<A> would not return a B (it could, of course, but it's not guaranteed).
May
21
comment Java: cast collection type to subtype
@pkk: that only applies if you look at the type system purely from a JVM perspective. Generics are almost entirely a language-level construct, so the JVM knows little to nothing about it (that's where I agree with you). But the whole point of generics was that they can be applied in combination with legacy code and iff the compiler gives no warning, their guarantees will hold. Casting through a raw type (i.e. doing what the JVM would do anyway) defeats the purpose of generics, by breaking the type system.