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1d
comment How to call a static method in same application with different stack
Use a better library? (Yes, this is a serious suggestion.)
2d
answered Why won't this scanf format-string work? “%[^\n]\n”
2d
comment Why won't this scanf format-string work? “%[^\n]\n”
I believe your edited explanation is incorrect. While, indeed, typing a literal \n will make the OP's scanf() stop reading input, so will typing anything that isn't whitespace.
2d
comment Why won't this scanf format-string work? “%[^\n]\n”
This answer would be significantly improved by an explanation of why it's sufficient, and why the OP's reasonable-looking syntax doesn't work.
Feb
2
comment Perl: autovivification doesn't create array in hash
@jasondancks: Ah, OK. I guess you didn't realize that arrays autovivify in Perl, too. Anyway, the code inside your loops works just fine. As Schwern notes above, most likely your loops never run in the first place, either because $INPUT[$cnt] is undefined, or because fetchrow_array never returns a non-empty list. But without an MCVE, we can't really tell why that might be happening.
Feb
2
comment non-recursive DFS algorithm for simple paths between two points
As Idos notes, "is wrong" and "has a problem" are all but useless statements for diagnosing a problem. Please edit your question to at least provide your test graph and start/end nodes, and preferably also a list of the paths you expect to see, as well as the list actually generated by the algorithm.
Feb
2
comment Perl: autovivification doesn't create array in hash
(Also, I'm not sure why the OP is defining %QUEUES as a hash, and then indexing it with integers from 0 to 19. Surely an array would be better for that? But at least that shouldn't affect the autovivification behavior in any way.)
Feb
2
comment Perl: autovivification doesn't create array in hash
@MattJacob: $current_queue=($current_queue+1)%$thread_count; increments $current_queue by one modulo $thread_count. There's surely nothing weird there, is there? That said, I'm unable to reproduce the problem as described, so I'm voting to put this question on hold until an actual example demonstrating the unwanted behavior is provided.
Feb
1
comment T-SQL pattern matching with exceptions
@srutzky: I'm using the hosted DB. I suppose I could look into downloading the data, but a solution that works online would be preferable.
Feb
1
comment T-SQL pattern matching with exceptions
Yes. The real use case that prompted this question was actually finding posts with image URLs that use the http:// scheme prefix but do not point to the host i.stack.imgur.com.
Feb
1
revised T-SQL pattern matching with exceptions
clarify counterexample
Feb
1
comment T-SQL pattern matching with exceptions
Alas, this will not match e.g. 'a fooing fooer foos the foos', which I do want to match. Let me update my example in the question.
Feb
1
asked T-SQL pattern matching with exceptions
Jan
28
revised Select elements with randomly-generated IDs with CSS
simplify
Jan
28
revised Select elements with randomly-generated IDs with CSS
incorporate the simplified selector suggested by the OP
Jan
28
comment Does the :not pseudo class increase the specificity of a selector?
@BoltClock: Answered. Thanks for the note!
Jan
28
answered Select elements with randomly-generated IDs with CSS
Jan
27
comment Does the :not pseudo class increase the specificity of a selector?
@BoltClock: That requires the selector to already have a class or ID in it. Actually, my original use case for this trick was making a style like a[rel=nofollow] { color: green } (specificity 0,1,1; injected by a user script) take precedence over, say, a#someid { color: black } (specificity 1,0,1; already present in site style sheet). Using a[rel=nofollow]:not(#nosuchid) (specificity 1,1,1) does the trick. (Of course, !important would've worked too... except that it turned out some of the existing styles I wanted to override were already using !important.)
Jan
27
comment Does the :not pseudo class increase the specificity of a selector?
A trick I've found occasionally useful for artificially increasing the specificity of a selector is to append :not(.nosuchclassname) or :not(#nosuchid) to it. Yes, it's ugly, but it's still better than resorting to !important.
Jan
27
comment How to return to original scroll position after submitting a form using javascript?
Using localStorage for this could produce unexpected behavior if the user had the same page open in multiple tabs. sessionStorage would be safer in this respect.