22,709 reputation
43259
bio website vyznev.net
location Helsinki, Finland
age
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen 31 mins ago

I'm a PhD student in biomathematics, working on stochastic individual-based models of evolution in spatially structured populations. My other interests include cryptography, programming games and puzzles, photography and graphic design.

I started programming (in AmigaBASIC) when I was 10 years old. Nowadays, I'm most comfortable using Perl, C and JavaScript. I know Java and PHP too, but I can't really say I like them. I also know some Python, but not as much as I'd like.


CC-Zero Please consider any (original) code I post to Stack Overflow and other Stack Exchange sites to be released under CC-Zero unless stated otherwise. You may do whatever you want with it and don't have to credit me in any way, although of course that would be nice.


I'm the main author and maintainer of the Stack Overflow Unofficial Patch (SOUP), a user script for browsers with GreaseMonkey-compatible user script support (Firefox, Chrome, Opera, possibly Safari) that fixes or works around a number of outstanding issues with the Stack Exchange user interface.

I tend to answer a lot more questions than I ask. Some answers I'm rather proud of:


Sep
19
comment What is the length of a string in a byte array?
Wow, I wonder who came up with that average, and what data set they used. Somehow, it reminds me of the joke about the statistician who sticks his head in the oven and his feet in the freezer, and declares himself to be, on average, comfortably warm.
Sep
19
comment Finding missing number using binary search
@BobTempl: It's a binary search in the space of 32-bit integers. We're not looking for the missing number in the file (which would be hopeless, since, by definition, it's not there); we're looking for it in the range of numbers from 0 to 0xFFFFFFFF. By counting the numbers in the intersection of a given subrange with the contents of the file, we can tell whether the missing number (or at least one of them, if several) is in that subrange.
Sep
19
comment using a regex to search an xml file using Perl
@mirod: Sure, but depending on context, there's a pretty good chance that whoever wrote it meant to write <tag><badline></tag>. (OK, except that that's not valid XML; it should be <tag><badline/></tag>, but still...)
Sep
18
comment Is it possible to get POE::Component::IRC to receive events for its own PRIVMSGs?
The RFCs don't actually spell this out clearly -- in fact, they don't seem to forbid servers from echoing PRIVMSGs back, they just don't require it, either. The closest I can find is Example 4 in RFC 2810, section 5.2.1, which says that messages sent to a channel with no other users "go to the server and then nowhere else." What you can do, however, is telnet / netcat to a real IRC server, type in your own IRC commands and see what happens. (In fact, as a corner case, if you directly PRIVMSG your own nick, you do seem to get an echo.)
Sep
15
comment Translate <body onload function to Javascript function?
The question this was closed as a dupe of has been auto-deleted. Voting to reopen.
Sep
15
comment Parsing a pipe delimited file in python
@jwodder: Whatever the reason, it seems to have worked: this question got two valid answers, while the other one got none and was auto-deleted. Voting to reopen, despite the awful score.
Sep
15
comment How to generate the random default “gravatars” like on Stack Overflow?
Note: The question this was originally closed as a duplicate of has been migrated to Meta Stack Exchange, but IMO this remains a valid question for Stack Overflow, too. I have thus cleaned it up and voted to reopen it.
Sep
10
comment Find all (x,y) where |f(X,Y) – v1| < t by least evaluations
@TheGame: Start at top left, x = 1, y = 100. Evaluate function there. If f(x,y) < v1 + t, increment x, else decrement y. Repeat until hit bottom or right edge. You've now found the upper edge of the region; now do the same for the lower edge. Each edge takes at most 199 evaluations, and they overlap on at least one point (1, 100), so 397 evaluations should be enough even in worst case.
Sep
10
comment Find all (x,y) where |f(X,Y) – v1| < t by least evaluations
I'm not sure why you'd need the initial binary search; even without it, you can solve the problem in at most 2 * (m + n) - 3 function evaluations for an m*n grid (i.e. at most 397 for 100*100) just by walking each threshold starting from the top left corner.
Sep
4
comment Is 1.0 a valid output from std::generate_canonical?
@supercat: To digress a bit, there actually are good reasons to try to make sine functions as accurate as possible for small angles, e.g. because small errors in sin(x) can turn into large errors in sin(x)/x (which occurs quite often in real-world calculations) when x is close to zero. The "extra precision" near multiples of π is generally just a side effect of that.
Aug
31
comment Check if questions can be assigned
Which part of the exercise are you having trouble with?
Aug
31
comment Why doesnt this htaccess rewrite work?
@user3096760: Ah, it's because .swf files run on the client, and so don't see server-side rewrites. See edit above.
Aug
31
comment Why doesnt this htaccess rewrite work?
@user3096760: That's funny, because I just tested it too, and it works for me. How do you tell that it "doesn't do the query"?
Aug
29
comment Algorithm to find “ordered combinations”
If the two strings are identical (and have no duplicate elements), the number of "ordered combinations" will be 2^n-n-1, where n is the length of the strings. Thus, the worst-case time and space requirements will inevitably be exponential. Assuming you want to use this on strings longer than, say, a few dozen elements, the tricky part will finding clever ways to do this efficiently in the special cases where the output won't be huge (and hoping that the other cases won't come up).
Aug
25
comment What is the >>>= operator in C?
@chux: Apparently, that depends on whether the code is compiled as C or (as it was originally tagged) C++. But I fixed the text to say "character literal" instead of "char literal", and added a Wikipedia link. Thanks!
Aug
25
comment What is the >>>= operator in C?
@Kay: The hex float literals are part of C99, but GCC also accepts them in C++ code. As Dietrich notes, the p separates the mantissa and the exponent, just like the e in normal scientific float notation; one difference is that, with hex floats, the base of the exponential part is 2 instead of 10, so 0x0.1p1 equals 0x0.1 = 1/16 times 2¹ = 2. (In any case, none of that matters here; any non-zero value would work equally well there.)
Aug
4
comment JavaScript: prevent unintentional creation of new property
One thing that can help is working in an IDE or other editor that can autocomplete property names (such as the JavaScript console in most browsers). Of course, this may not work for cases like your first example, because the IDE may not be smart enough to know what kind of an object document.getElementById() is going to return. OTOH, if you've already saved the element in a variable elem, at least Firefox JS console (just tested it) is smart enough to suggest elem.innerHTML when you type elem.inn.
Aug
1
comment Read bunch of JPGs from container
You could probably get away with just parsing the JPEG chunk structure, without actually decoding the image data. That should be doable in a few dozen lines of C/C++ code, even without any libraries.
Aug
1
comment Read bunch of JPGs from container
Ps. While looking for the SOI marker is a pretty good way to find possible starting points (especially if you check for the following JFIF/Exif chunk, too), just blindly looking for the EOI marker is not a reliable way to tell where the image ends. In particular, besides the possibility of the marker occurring in the image data by chance, it's also quite possible for a JPEG image to have another JPEG image (such as a thumbnail) nested inside it. The only reliable way to tell where the image ends is to incrementally parse the data stream until you find the end (or an error).
Aug
1
comment Read bunch of JPGs from container
Hmm... if GIL can't do it, libjpeg surely can. However, it's a rather low-level C library, so it may or may not be easy (depending on how familiar you are with such things).