38,817 reputation
1598174
bio website realultimateprogramming.blogs…
location Duluth, GA
age 34
visits member for 6 years, 7 months
seen Mar 26 at 16:02

I like to spend time with my lovely wife, our two beautiful daughters, and our dog. I'm also a fan of geek humor, and I've been known to flip out and write code… elegant code, if I'm really lucky.


Mar
28
awarded  Good Question
Mar
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
19
awarded  Good Answer
Mar
16
awarded  Good Answer
Mar
2
awarded  Favorite Question
Feb
12
comment PHP: Storing 'objects' inside the $_SESSION
@Toskan In my experience, the only way to keep out "something that does not belong to the session" is to assume that nothing belongs in the session until you convince the rest of the team it does. Even then, it's a good idea to go back and review, because it's easy for somebody to accidentally add a (potentially memory-intensive) property to some object that is being serialized into the session by some other chunk of code, and suddenly you're having to spin up more servers because of some mysterious "memory leak". I don't disagree that the session has its uses; I just believe it is overused.
Feb
12
awarded  Stellar Question
Feb
10
comment PHP: Storing 'objects' inside the $_SESSION
@Toskan "whammy one" isn't about CPU, it's about memory. People inevitably wind up with much more stuff in the session than they realize; it's just so easy. From a CPU/time perspective, the only "slow" thing about the hashtable-based version of a session would be whenever it has to grow: once it's big enough, it can be a challenge to suddenly allocate such a gigantic chunk of contiguous memory (because you might not have that much, and suddenly the GC/runtime has to rearrange "free" pages, compact trash, etc.).
Feb
10
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
12
awarded  Great Answer
Jan
7
awarded  Pundit
Dec
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
29
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
10
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
18
awarded  Good Answer
Nov
17
comment What exactly is RESTful programming?
@whitelettersandblankspaces It's one of the core tenets of REST as described in Fielding's thesis. I highly recommend you read it, as he does it more justice than I possibly could in a comment on SO. The TL;DR of it is that you should use rich ContentTypes that embed possible actions in each representation, the way href in an HTML document indicates other resources you could request. The idea is to provide machine-discoverability, as opposed to APIs where all the endpoints are documented and humans are expected to figure out how to put them together. It's really hard to get right, BTW.
Oct
9
awarded  Good Question
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
9
awarded  Nice Answer