688 reputation
412
bio website
location India
age 29
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Jun 7 at 18:12

I have close to 5 year experience in software industry.

Areas of interest include:

  1. CPU
  2. Compilers
  3. Operating System
  4. Programming languages
  5. OOP and OOAD
  6. Software Architecture and Design
  7. Algorithms and Dara-structures.
  8. Parallel and distributed computing.
  9. C, C++ and Python programming languages.
  10. Anything that I do not know!

Apr
22
comment Getting started with boost
As I said. I am pretty happy with the answer I got so far. My question is similar to a novice asking what all programming languages should I know to have a decent career : And the answer would be know at least 2/3 of C, C++, Java, python, perl, php, C#
Apr
22
comment Getting started with boost
Its certainly alright. I am very happy with the responses. Just wondering if asking a question like that is a bad idea. No flames.
Apr
22
comment Getting started with boost
Whoa! I didn't expect so many down votes. I start learning C++ and somewhere I read something like "you gotta know Boost". So I go to boost.org and get familiar with what Boost is all about. Next question is where do I begin? What are the most commonly used or most generic ones? Isn't that a natural question?
Apr
22
asked Getting started with boost
Feb
6
comment Threads vs Processes in Linux
I think we are missing 1 point. If you make multiple process for your web server, then you have to write another process to open the socket and pass 'work' to different threads. Threading offers a single process multiple threads, clean design. In many situations thread is just natural and in other situation a new process is just natural. When the problem falls in a gray area the other trade offs as explained by ephemient becomes important.
Feb
3
comment concurrent access and free of heap object
I guess the problem boils down to ensuring that there are no external references to the object, at the time of doing free. So if the external references is a pointer we will need another lock outside the ds to ensure the object is not gone. This is why they invented shared_ptr in boost.
Feb
3
comment concurrent access and free of heap object
@AlexeyKukanov I am hopeful we can workout some solution using reference counting. We are free to constrain the users to use the ds in particular way there by ensuring that no one can make an illegal access. The solution is not apparent to me, and my hopes are bordering on pessimism!
Feb
3
comment concurrent access and free of heap object
@KerrekSB I am of the same opinion that this problem is unsolvable whether mutex or its pointer is inside the data structure. I think there might be some solution using atomic CAS instruction / hazard pointer as suggested by someone in the original problem.
Feb
2
comment concurrent access and free of a data structure
Refer stackoverflow.com/questions/9117007/…
Feb
2
asked concurrent access and free of heap object
Feb
2
comment concurrent access and free of a data structure
On second approach, I will look for a CAS solution. Basically I have not been able to come up with a strategy where I keep a lock inside the node. And concurrently read and free it.
Feb
2
comment concurrent access and free of a data structure
Thanks. First approach doesn't work me because the purpose of delete threads is to regain the memory.
Feb
2
comment concurrent access and free of a data structure
I edited the question. There are 20 threads in all. 10 deletion threads and 10 search threads. Search threads search by looping through the list. Delete threads directly delete the pointer present in the list. The problem is just representative, I am looking for something better than a coarse grained lock.
Feb
2
awarded  Editor
Feb
2
revised concurrent access and free of a data structure
added 6 characters in body
Feb
2
comment concurrent access and free of a data structure
Its a duplicate indeed. My question explains the scenario in more details.
Feb
2
asked concurrent access and free of a data structure
Jan
30
answered How exactly does OS protect kernel
Jan
25
answered Is it possible that a single-threaded program is executed simultaneously on more than one CPU core?
Jan
25
answered Can a shared ready queue limit the scalability of a multiprocessor system?