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Apr
26
comment Behavior of entrySet().removeIf in ConcurrentHashMap
As described here, the only guarantee that you have is that the elements traversed by the iterator existed in the map at the time of the iterator's construction. Those elements may no longer exist, or may be changed by the time you access them using the iterator. My recommendation is that you use the iterator only as an indication of possibility, but perform all operations directly on the map (for example, using map.remove(key,value) rather than iterator.remove()).
Apr
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
19
comment Eclipse huge CPU spikes
Blocked threads won't cause a CPU spike. Look for the ones that are running.
Feb
18
comment Eclipse huge CPU spikes
Trigger a thread dump next time it happens. Have the kill -3 PID ready in a separate window so that you can trigger it as soon as Eclipse becomes unresponsive (nb, not "irresponsible").
Feb
11
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
5
comment Is there a way to get the value of a HashMap randomly in Java?
@RegUser - HashMaps are designed to be accessed by key rather than value. There are uses for bidirectional mappings, but you should choose a class designed for that purpose and not try force HashMap to do something that it wasn't designed to do.
Feb
5
comment Not getting extends java.lang.Object in bytecode. so why compiler is not adding it in newer version of java?
As posted, the bytecode shows a call to the superclass ctor; the OP was complaining that it doesn't shown an explicit "extends" clause.
Jan
23
comment File lock between threads and processes
Show your code with FileLock in place; there should be no reason that the two can't coexist. My gut feel, however, is that you're using the wrong solution to whatever problem that you're trying to solve, and you would probably get better answers if you describe the problem and not your implementation.
Jan
15
comment Bug in Oracle's JDK zip filesystem, how do you write an SSCCE to reproduce it?
Also, try creating an OutputStream decorator that throws when close() is called twice.
Jan
15
comment Bug in Oracle's JDK zip filesystem, how do you write an SSCCE to reproduce it?
I might look into the size of what's written to the zip entry. And take a very close look at the source to figure out possible places that it could break.
Jan
10
comment Can a JAR modify itself during runtime
On the other hand, if you really are curious, you might find this section of the JVM Spec useful. Followed by a close reading of URLClassLoader and the classes it uses (especially JarFile).
Jan
10
comment Can a JAR modify itself during runtime
As written, your question can be answered with Yes, No, or Maybe. It all depends on what you're really trying to achieve. If you can narrow down to an exact situation, I'll answer (or, more likely, mark as a duplicate of the question that has the answer). But for now, I'm voting to close as Too Broad.
Jan
9
comment Can a JAR modify itself during runtime
What is the actual problem that you're trying to solve.
Jan
7
comment When is Fork/Join executor preferred to a Thread Pool executor in Java?
Agreed, and this isn't "too broad" a question either (although it might be a duplicate). A fork-join pool has the feature of work stealing: when your executing task calls join(), it potentially gives up its thread to another task. This is useful for applications like a parallel merge sort: with a normal executor service, you kick off tasks for the child sorts, but your parent task still holds the thread while waiting for the children. As a result, you quickly run out of threads. The fork-join pool, by comparison, will potentially take the parent task's thread to run the child task.
Dec
22
comment <ol> with numbers another color
@SepehrM - as way to easily distinguish HTML elements from other selectors.
Dec
17
comment Storing the contents in a String variable rather than a file
Your first example doesn't consider encoding. The transformer will generate output using UTF-8, the toString() function uses the default encoding (which may not be UTF-8). You second example is the correct one.
Dec
9
comment Is Files.getLastModifiedTime() leaking memory?
So it's the Windows memory that your concerned about? Have you checked whether the commit charge is increasing, or just the process "Mem Usage" number? The latter is mostly meaningless. If the commit charge (on the Performance tab) increases, then there might be a problem. It's unlikely to be in Files.getLastModifiedTime(), but that's easy to check: run in an endless loop, and if the program isn't killed you know it's not to blame. More likely is the scheduled executor pool, but I suspect that what you're seeing is a misleading number that includes the stack allocationss of dead threads.
Dec
9
comment Is Files.getLastModifiedTime() leaking memory?
This is how garbage collection works. The program keeps allocating memory that eventually turns into garbage. When it can't allocate more memory from the free pool, it collects the garbage. There would be a problem only if the heap didn't decrease after GC (whether triggered automatically by the JVM or manually).
Dec
8
comment Cassandra read performance almost a constant with replication
You're probably limited by your client, rather than the server(s). But unless you post your code, nobody here can tell you that.