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Startup: Beeminder.com

Blog: MessyMatters.com

Homepage: Dreev.es

Twitter.com/dreev

Favorite programming language: Mathematica

Random fact: Dreeves is an ultra-marathon inline skater


Nov
6
comment Making matplotlib's date2num and num2date perfect inverses
When I run this my output is 2010-03-31 01:46:40+00:00 --> 2010-03-31 06:46:40+00:00 (1270000000 --> 1270018000)
Nov
6
asked Making matplotlib's date2num and num2date perfect inverses
Nov
2
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
24
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
19
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
16
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
12
comment Unpacking arguments: only named arguments may follow *expression
Thanks again for the elucidating answer. See also my answer for more about this, and the workaround I was looking for.
Oct
12
revised Unpacking arguments: only named arguments may follow *expression
added 11 characters in body
Oct
10
accepted Unpacking arguments: only named arguments may follow *expression
Oct
10
answered Unpacking arguments: only named arguments may follow *expression
Oct
7
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
5
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
4
comment Unpacking arguments: only named arguments may follow *expression
Interesting! Thanks! I didn't mean to phrase it as "have to" but was curious about the rationale. Sounds like it may have been rather arbitrary. As for a workaround, looks like apply(f, a+[3]) would do it, though I see that apply() is deprecated.
Oct
4
comment Unpacking arguments: only named arguments may follow *expression
I think I may disagree with this, in particular the "python doesn't know that" part. As Raymond Hettinger says, it seems to be an arbitrary restriction. I could imagine an efficiency argument against the liberalization though.
Oct
4
asked Unpacking arguments: only named arguments may follow *expression
Sep
21
awarded  Custodian
Sep
21
awarded  Guru
Sep
21
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
18
comment Assignment order matters unexpectedly with “exec expr in globals(), locals()”
Ironically I started with a dictionary but wanted to use the values in some messy expressions so I wanted to create a local variable for every key in the dict so I could say, for example, "a" instead of "data['a']". (So my hideous solution does accomplish that, as long as I don't assign to those local variables either before or after the execs!)
Sep
18
comment Assignment order matters unexpectedly with “exec expr in globals(), locals()”
Thanks! Any suggestions for workarounds? How would you do an eval that sets a local variable?