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Feb
27
comment IAR inline assembly using global C variable
Just a guess: have you tried =%0instead of %0?
Feb
23
comment Interesting float bug in Calculator - why does this occur?
Yes, it's difficult to imagine a floating-point algorithm that doesn't evaluate the square root of 4 as exactly 2, whatever the precision.
Feb
23
comment Why we can't use operators with floating point numbers?
x-0.1 will be very non-zero -- in the worst case, about 0.05 * epsilon in absolute value. This is 0.1*2^-24 in IEEE 32-bit format; for this format, even without using denormalised numbers, the smallest representable positive number is 2^-126. This huge difference will not disappear for any realistic floating-point representation.
Feb
23
comment Why we can't use operators with floating point numbers?
This is a bad example. If x doesn't compare equal to 0.1, then x-0.1 will not compare equal to 0.0, and can safely be divided by.
Feb
18
comment I have problems implementing the ++ increment operator
@iharob: You are not to blame for getting this wrong. In my opinion, it is the worst design decision in all of the vast C++ language.
Feb
12
comment STM32 Large binary created when using malloc
Really, 400MB? Not 400KB?
Feb
8
comment How to prevent GCC from using specified registers?
"callee-saved registers (saved by the caller)": make up your mind!
Feb
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
5
comment Make with Qt Creator : no rule to make target needed by
If anything like that happens to me, the first thing I do is run qmake on the project. Have you tried this? (Edit: I see now that this solved your problem)
Jan
28
comment How to try using Native Methods in Java card applets?
I think this is right -- you can't test it, simply because there is no way to specify a native method in a CAP file. So the Security Target rule is automatically satisfied.
Jan
28
comment How to try using Native Methods in Java card applets?
I think they just mean native methods. This will be difficult to test, because presumably your development environment won't even compile such a thing, which means you can't test it in your card.
Jan
27
comment Why “override” is at the end in C++11?
@JerryCoffin: It seems we are in agreement here.
Jan
27
comment Why “override” is at the end in C++11?
@Jerry: Yes. The first override is the context-dependent keyword, and the second override is the return type. Like I said, it's a bit more complicated that way.
Jan
27
comment Why “override” is at the end in C++11?
@JerryCoffin: Yes. But t3chb0t's point is that they could have still retained compatibility with existing code by allowing override before a member function declaration instead of after it. And I agree. So in that sense my answer was overly simplistic -- the point is that allowing override before a function declaration would have made the context-dependency rules more complicated and harder to implement.
Jan
27
comment Why “override” is at the end in C++11?
@t3chb0t: I think we are agreed that the context-dependency rules are simpler this way. Let's just leave it at that.
Jan
27
comment Why “override” is at the end in C++11?
@t3chb0t: Perhaps you are right. But if override and final are typedefs, it's not obvious to a human how to parse e.g. virtual override final f();
Jan
27
answered Why “override” is at the end in C++11?
Jan
26
comment ASN.1 REAL - BER decoding
Well then, whatever you do will just be shooting in the dark.
Jan
26
comment ASN.1 REAL - BER decoding
OK, now I get it. So please answer my questions (i) and (ii).
Jan
26
comment ASN.1 REAL - BER decoding
There is no ASN.1 type DOUBLE.