Christian Palmstierna
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 Yearling
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  • 56 votes cast
Mar
13
comment Surrogate int, float and decimal using Json.NET
Ah, of course. Shoot. Maybe for object arrays you could fall back to the surrogate solution?
Mar
12
comment Surrogate int, float and decimal using Json.NET
In that case, I think embedding the type information into the JSON key might be the way to do it (see my last edit). That way you can skip the quotation marks around the value and only use 1 or 2 characters for signifying the type. Not very portable, but probably the most compact JSON solution.
Mar
12
revised Surrogate int, float and decimal using Json.NET
Added another suggestion.
Mar
12
comment Surrogate int, float and decimal using Json.NET
What's the main priority? Payload size? Portability/compatibility? Performance?
Mar
12
comment Surrogate int, float and decimal using Json.NET
I realize this is quite similar to your current approach, but if I interpret your problem correctly, I don't see any way around it. The type info has to go somewhere, and if you don't want hints on the type itself, then where else than in the serialized payload itself?
Mar
12
answered Surrogate int, float and decimal using Json.NET
Aug
27
awarded  Yearling
May
6
comment Running Bundler on Windows - permission denied on /dev/null
Yeah, I know about /dev/null :) It sounds right that it's a problem on Bundler's end. I saw a snippet of code from a different version of the source file in question, and there it evaluated a "is windows" variable instead.
May
6
asked Running Bundler on Windows - permission denied on /dev/null
Aug
27
awarded  Yearling
Apr
13
accepted MS C# compiler and non-optimized code
Nov
6
accepted BuildManager.AddReferencedAssembly and BuildManager.GetObjectFactory
Nov
6
comment BuildManager.AddReferencedAssembly and BuildManager.GetObjectFactory
Ah. It works as it should if I put the plugin assembly in the bin folder. I was under the impression that using BuildManager.AddReferencedAssembly would be equivalent to placing it in the bin folder. One thing I don't understand, though: Why doesn't AddReferencedAssembly work? My line of thought is basically this: The BuildManager is responsible for dynamic compilation of pages. Calling AddReferencedAssembly should then ensure that the BuildManager can use a given assembly when compiling. Obviously, this is not the case, so where is my thinking going wrong? :-)
Nov
5
asked BuildManager.AddReferencedAssembly and BuildManager.GetObjectFactory
Sep
23
comment Best place to store config and log files for a Windows service
True, it depends on what you're logging. If the application is very verbose it might be better to use another log repository.
Sep
23
answered Best place to store config and log files for a Windows service
Sep
21
comment How to serialize nested types in WCF response?
@Monty: The reason for using this approach is because to my knowledge, there is no easy way to see exceptions that occur when a response is serialized. You can enable logging on the service, but then you catch it "after the fact" and can't inspect the application or the exception.
Sep
21
comment How to serialize nested types in WCF response?
@Monty: Ahh, maybe I should have been more clear :) What I mean't was that you can add some test code on the server side that manually serializes the return object, catch any exception thrown by the serializer and inspect it in debug mode.
Sep
21
comment How to serialize nested types in WCF response?
@Monty: Ah, in my experience that usually means a serialization error on the server side. Try to serialize the return object yourself by creating a DataContractSerializer, and you should get a more detailed exception on the server side.
Sep
21
comment How to serialize nested types in WCF response?
Please give a description of how the service fails. What exception do you get?