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May
21
comment Regex Alternation Order
@zmo - please do not edit my answer. The change you made made it incorrect!
May
21
comment Regex Alternation Order
\w+ greedily matches a single word only. In this case it makes no difference to the overall match if were made to be lazy. Same goes for the {1,3} quantifier. The regex engine must try all possibilities before giving up and even if the all the quantifiers are lazy, the last alternative will always ba able match before the other alternatives.
May
21
answered Regex Alternation Order
May
21
comment Regex Alternation Order
No, the greediness of the \w+ (or the {1,3}) quantifiers is not the problem. Its the fact that an NFA regex engine matches the longest leftmost substring. As long as there are three words preceeding floor, the other two options will never get a chance to match regardless of the greediness/laziness of any of the quantifiers.
May
20
comment 100% CPU Usage in windows service application
The problem may be due to: catastrophic backtracking with one or more of your patterns. You'll need to post your regexes for more useful help.
May
20
comment \b is not matching what I thought it would match
It should be noted that \b is a zero width assertion and does not match any character. It matches a location between characters. Other zero width assertions include $^ anchors, lookaheads and lookbehinds.
May
20
revised How can I parse a CSV string with Javascript?
Added disclaimer
May
20
answered Perl search replace with negative lookahead
May
20
comment PHP RegEx capturing a bigger match ignoring a smaller match
Please, Please, DO NOT USE THE U MODIFIER - its only purpose is to confuse. When you need a lazy/ungreedy/reluctant quantifier, simply append a: ?, e.g. .*? (as in @hwnd's answer). Besides, for this application, it would be better to use a more precise expression: '/\{([^{}|]*)\|([^{}]*)\}/', which is faster, more accurate, and does not need the dot at all. (In fact, I'm very tempted to down vote this answer - for encouraging the use of the U.)
May
20
revised JavaScript RegEx- the | pipe is not checking the length
Spelling
May
20
answered JavaScript RegEx- the | pipe is not checking the length
May
19
comment preg_match - can only consist of numbers, hyphens(-) and spaces
Please escape that hyphen in the middle of your character class (or place it at the start or end).
May
19
awarded  Good Answer
May
18
revised Match <pre> and </pre> inside a <pre>
Tidied up regex comments a bit.
May
18
revised Match <pre> and </pre> inside a <pre>
Added missing semicolon.
May
18
answered Match <pre> and </pre> inside a <pre>
May
17
comment RegEx for “ but not \”
I see that the contents of the string are to be captured. In this case my recommended regex would be: /"([^\\"]*(?:\\.[^\\"]*)*)"/
May
17
comment RegEx for “ but not \”
Uh oh, I just spotted a problem: "((?:[^\\"]+|\\.)*)" experinces catastrophic backtracking when applied to non-matching strings such as "12345678901234567890. (The + on the [^\\"]+ needs to either be made atomic (prolly not supported by AutoIT), or removed entirely.)
May
17
comment RegEx for “ but not \”
Yes, +1, but /"[^\\"]*(?:\\.[^\\"]*)*"/ is much more efficient. See: PHP: Regex to ignore escaped quotes within quotes Haven't you read MRE3 yet? (I'f not you are really missing out - especially considering your ginormous regex-fu! - Just sayin')
May
16
comment regular expression pattern in c# returns empty string
First and foremost, with C#, always enclose your regex in @"raw string" format. (Then you'll never need to worry about the backslash soup problem again.)