14,633 reputation
22340
bio website jmrware.com
location Salt Lake City, UT
age 57
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen 5 hours ago

May
20
revised JavaScript RegEx- the | pipe is not checking the length
Spelling
May
20
answered JavaScript RegEx- the | pipe is not checking the length
May
19
comment preg_match - can only consist of numbers, hyphens(-) and spaces
Please escape that hyphen in the middle of your character class (or place it at the start or end).
May
19
awarded  Good Answer
May
18
revised Match <pre> and </pre> inside a <pre>
Tidied up regex comments a bit.
May
18
revised Match <pre> and </pre> inside a <pre>
Added missing semicolon.
May
18
answered Match <pre> and </pre> inside a <pre>
May
17
comment RegEx for “ but not \”
I see that the contents of the string are to be captured. In this case my recommended regex would be: /"([^\\"]*(?:\\.[^\\"]*)*)"/
May
17
comment RegEx for “ but not \”
Uh oh, I just spotted a problem: "((?:[^\\"]+|\\.)*)" experinces catastrophic backtracking when applied to non-matching strings such as "12345678901234567890. (The + on the [^\\"]+ needs to either be made atomic (prolly not supported by AutoIT), or removed entirely.)
May
17
comment RegEx for “ but not \”
Yes, +1, but /"[^\\"]*(?:\\.[^\\"]*)*"/ is much more efficient. See: PHP: Regex to ignore escaped quotes within quotes Haven't you read MRE3 yet? (I'f not you are really missing out - especially considering your ginormous regex-fu! - Just sayin')
May
16
comment regular expression pattern in c# returns empty string
First and foremost, with C#, always enclose your regex in @"raw string" format. (Then you'll never need to worry about the backslash soup problem again.)
May
15
comment How to create regex for passwords contain at least 1 of the following: lowercase letters, uppercase letters, numbers
You're welcome. And remember that the search tool is your friend! (LOTs of good info here on StackOverfow...)
May
15
comment How to create regex for passwords contain at least 1 of the following: lowercase letters, uppercase letters, numbers
Ok, I missed your multi-category requirements. In that case take a look at this one: Password checking RegEx that matches multiple criteria. Not as pretty, but it can be done in a single regex.
May
15
comment How to create regex for passwords contain at least 1 of the following: lowercase letters, uppercase letters, numbers
Please do a search before asking. This question gets asked a LOT. e.g. See: Regular expression for a string that must contain minimum 14 characters, where at minimum 2 are numbers, and at minimum 6 are letters - there are many other answers here as well.
May
15
awarded  regex
May
14
comment Regex Pattern to Match, Excluding when… / Except between
A correct answer to this problem is highly dependent upon the target text you are matching against. e.g. If it is C code, then you'll need to fully parse the text to filter out "quoted strings" and /* multi-lined comments */ which may themselves contain the tokens you are searching for; For example: should any of the five-digit numbers be matched from the following string: '/* if( */ 12345 ") { 67890; }" '? You need to clearly define the type of file the regex will be applied to, because a solution for one type of file, (say, JavaScript), will likely fail for another (say, SQL).
May
14
comment Regex Pattern to Match, Excluding when… / Except between
Your s2 and s3 requirements appear to be contradictory. s2 implies that parentheses are always matched and may be nested, but s3 requires that the: "if(" open paren be closed, not with a ")", but rather with a: "//endif"? And if for s3 you really meant that the if clause should be closed with: "//endif)", then the s3 requirement is a subset of s2.
May
14
comment how does using a negated character class work internally (without backtracking)?
Read: Mastering Regular Expressions (3rd Edition). The answer to this, (and everything else regex), will be clearly and entertainingly revealed!
May
14
revised Using Namegroups with literal less-than-greater-than brackets
Renamed .NET regex variable in example.
May
14
comment Using Namegroups with literal less-than-greater-than brackets
Actually, I think it needs to be changed to \3 (See my answer for an explanation.)