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22340
bio website jmrware.com
location Salt Lake City, UT
age 57
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 1 hour ago

Jul
8
comment Regex Pattern to Match, Excluding when… / Except between
Sorry if I sounded harsh - that was certainly not my intent. My point (as in my second comment to the original question above) is that a correct solution is highly dependent upon the target text being searched. My example has JavaScript source code as the target text which has one double quote enclosed within a single quoted string. It could have just as easily been a literal RegExp such as: var bug1 = /"[^"]*"|(Tarzan)/gi; and had the same effect (and this second example is certainly not an edge case). There are many more examples I could cite where this technique fails to work reliably.
Jul
7
comment Regex Pattern to Match, Excluding when… / Except between
Note that a similar bug manifestation appears in the popular Syntax Highlighter script. I wrote an article about that here: Fixing the SyntaxHighlighter 3.0.83 Parser Bug if anyone is interested.
Jul
7
comment Regex Pattern to Match, Excluding when… / Except between
Sorry, but Rex's "Best trick" simply does not work (reliably). Say you want to match Tarzan, but not when anywhere inside double quotes. The: /no|no|(yes)/ trick regex would be something like: /"[^"]*"|Tarzan/ (ignoring escaped chars). This will work for many cases, but fails completely when applied to the following valid JavaScript text: var bug1 = 'One " quote here. Should match this Tarzan'; var bug2 = "Should not match this Tarzan";. Rex's trick only works when ALL possible structures are matched - in other words - you need to fully parse the text to guarantee 100% accuracy.
Jun
24
comment IE10 (9,8) does not recognize DOCTYPE xhtml
Another symptom of this bug it that if you save a perfectly valid XHTML 1.0 Strict page to your hard disk, (which IE apparently renders correctly in Standards mode), IE10 still erroneously adds the extra above-mentioned bogus HTML 4 Transitional DOCTYPE and "fixes" all the webpage markup for you! (Clearly an IE BUG IMO.)
Jun
24
comment IE10 (9,8) does not recognize DOCTYPE xhtml
Yes, IE10 appears to operate in standards mode when a valid page is served with an XHTML Strict DOCTYPE, but (interestingly), if you save this page as an html file to your local computer, it adds the extra bogus HTML 4.0 doctype and "fixes" all the page's markup to be HTML 4 Transitional. IMHO - This is clearly an IE BUG.
Jun
15
comment Regex - how to ignore order of the matched groups?
Please do a search first - this question gets asked (and answered) a LOT - e.g. regex for password. I also recommend the following blog post: Mastering Lookahead and Lookbehind
Jun
14
comment Reference - What does this regex mean?
Mastering Regular Expressions (3rd Edition) needs to be prominently placed at the top of this answer in BIG BOLD LETTERS. When it comes to: "RTFM", this is clearly the gold standard. It is the teacher of how to fish, whereas everything else is just product sitting on fish market shelves. Have YOU ALL read it yet?
Jun
13
comment Regular Expression that only takes 3 zeros at most
@anubhava says: "You will need to use negative lookahead" Not true. This can be easily done without any lookaround at all. (But I'm not telling cause its supposed to be homework!)
Jun
13
comment check two slashes in string
For a preview, you may want to check out my Dynamic Regex Syntax Highlighter project - RegexTidy uses a similar methodology for parsing nested groups using javascript regex. It recognizes (and provides comments for) all PCRE 8.x group types (e.g.(?R), (?DEFINE..), (?(1)..), etc.) and includes built-in dynamic syntax highlighting. It will also be released as open source. You heard it here first!
Jun
13
comment check two slashes in string
Thanks. The reason I ask is because I'm about to release just such a tool: RegexTidy. I was pretty sure that no such tool exists yet so your answer scared me a bit!
Jun
13
comment check two slashes in string
+1 - Question: Did you use a tool to auto-generate the commented version or did you write it by hand?
Jun
13
comment How to creat a regex that matches everything exlude specific string
You're both right - the question is poorly defined.
Jun
12
comment Is the order of a preg_offset_capture sub-array *guaranteed* to be increasing offset?
Interesting question. (Had an answer, but spoke too soon - before reading entire question - D'oh!)
Jun
12
comment Phrase can contain two words (or none) and ends in semicolon
Yup, this'll do the trick. +1
Jun
12
comment html tidy and javascript regular expressions
Or one could use: /[<]/
Jun
12
comment Python - How to write a regex expression to extract the words following last comma?
This one should do it: [^,]+$
Jun
11
comment Regular expression to match minimum password requirements and other characters
@ss_millionaire - Well, I could, but not within the limited confines of a comment here. The short answer is that the greedy expression requires fewer steps for the regex engine to declare a match. (Lazy quantifiers require one backtrack per character - a greedy one can consume them all in a single step.) I can, however, strongly recommend the following book: Mastering Regular Expressions (3rd Edition) where regex efficiency is covered in great detail.
Jun
11
comment Regular expression to match minimum password requirements and other characters
I don't think PHP has a length() function. Did you mean strlen()?
Jun
11
comment Regular expression to match minimum password requirements and other characters
Note that you can make this regex more efficient by changing the lazy dot stars to more precise greedy expressions: /^(?=[^A-Z]*[A-Z])(?=[^a-z]*[a-z])(?=\D*\d).{8,}$/
Jun
11
comment Regular expression to match minimum password requirements and other characters
Please do a search next time. This question gets asked and answered a LOT. e.g. regex for password