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bio website sasq.programuj.com
location Earth, TX
age 32
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen Dec 17 at 13:16

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24
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
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awarded  Popular Question
Aug
30
awarded  Yearling
Aug
28
awarded  Notable Question
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awarded  Necromancer
Jul
13
answered LZ77 compression reserved bytes “< , >”
Jul
13
comment LZ77 compression reserved bytes “< , >”
@MarkAdler: The OP asks about LZ77, so adding DEFLATE and Huffman to the mix at his current level of understanding could only confuse him. In my opinion this is better to spare for later.
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
30
awarded  Self-Learner
Jun
28
comment What is the proper way of implementing a good “itoa()” function?
You didn't implemented itoa. You just forwarded its job to the library function sprintf which does the job for you.
Jun
7
comment SVG reuse a group but change fill color
Unfortunately the styles don't apply to the start/middle/end markers.
Jun
7
comment Make marker-end same color as path?
That sucks... ;/
May
24
comment Find out the position where a regular expression failed
My regexps are not always as simple as @dognose showed (and it's his example, not mine). But they're "simple" enough that a regular DFA would tell which character is a stumbling block. From automata theory we know that every regexp has an equivalent DFA. So if a DFA can tell me which character caused it to fail, I supposed a regexp engine could do it too. But it might depend on how the regexp engine is implemented (and this actually can make a big difference, as this article shows: swtch.com/~rsc/regexp/regexp1.html.
May
24
comment Find out the position where a regular expression failed
"I would say the match failed at the first character (the H‘) in this example" Why? "H" matches the part of the original regexp, as well as the whole "Hello " part. It only fails at "W", making the whole regexp fail. But I can still tell which character was the stumbling block.
May
23
comment Find out the position where a regular expression failed
Sure, I know how regexps work. But what you've said doesn't exclude what I'm asking. Notice that althought your regexp won't match the given string as a whole, there's still a certain character which makes it stop matching: there's m instead of the required W in the tested string. And that's what I want to know: the position of this particular character which has made the regexp to fail.
May
23
comment What functions a lexer needs to provide?
But this is a valid question to ask, if one wants to design an interface for his lexer in a way to make it ready for different user needs and make it comfortable to use it. There are some common use cases for a lexer, and missing them in one's design could be bad. Think of it as a question about a usual "design pattern" for a lexer.
May
23
comment What functions a lexer needs to provide?
2. prefetch: Should this function throw an error when there's nothing in the input buffer to prefetch? If yes, then what if the empty source is a valid program? Prefetching would cause an error. I think it's better to return an error when nextToken fails to get anything more from the input buffer, since it is an error when the parser expects some more text and there is none (premature end of file), similarly to expect mentioned by the OP.
May
23
comment What functions a lexer needs to provide?
I mostly agree with your sample functions, except these two: 1. "tokens like STRING and NUMBER have values; tokens like SEMICOLON don't": True, but I don't think this is the lexer's job to figure out these values. Especially in a statically-typed language where you cannot return different types of value from the Token object. I'd rather say it's a job of semantic analyzer which works on top of Parser and Lexer (value=semantics), or Parser's job if it needs to convert the token into a literal constant node in the AST. Thought I can see some benefit of it: avoiding scanning the lexeme twice.
May
23
asked Find out the position where a regular expression failed
May
23
comment Simple regex-based lexer in Python
@EliBendersky: Not if the regexp implementation is smart enough. Your alternatives will be merged in a way that if they have some common prefixes, they will be recognized in a single pass, and only the differing characters will make a split. For example, this pattern: "for|foreach|forbidden" and the string "foreach" it should match first three letters (the common prefix) only once, and then choosing the correct path depending on the first non-common character, here 'e' would choose the 2nd option and verify if the rest of it, 'ach', still matches. If it doesn't, none of the others can either.