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seen Nov 24 '11 at 14:59

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Nov
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comment Setter without a corresponding getter
Read the DDD book - it goes into this in detail.
Nov
9
comment Setter without a corresponding getter
@HappyDeveloper: Your assertion is flawed. Active Record is a pattern, not specific to field protection, not an ORM or a specific technology. It's actually mapping style. I suggest you grab a copy of the following book and read it: martinfowler.com/books.html#eaa then read amazon.com/Domain-Driven-Design-Tackling-Complexity-Software/dp/… - then I'm sure you will see my point. Protected still maintains encapsulation whereas public setters and getters don't. I think this is plainly obvious.
Nov
9
comment Setter without a corresponding getter
You are 100% incorrect. The field is protected, not private. Private data is not accessible. The protected field is accessible by proxies provided by the ORM which are superclasses of the object. Reflection is never used. You should NEVER expose public methods that aren't designed to be used by the end user - that's that hack here. I fire people for stuff like that! Have you ever used a (proper) ORM before?
Nov
9
comment Setter without a corresponding getter
Your ORM (doctrine etc) can read protected fields and persist them to a database. The purpose of storage is not discussed here as it's an "ideal" example. Info here: doctrine-project.org/docs/orm/2.1/en/reference/… ... this is a version of the OO principle of Separation of Concerns.
Nov
7
comment Cannot access my class in WebMatrix (razor) App_Data folder
Have you built the solution (Ctrl+Shift+B)?
Nov
7
comment MySql's Connector/Net with MVC 3
To be brutally honest, the default "providers" (membership/auth etc) with ASP.Net MVC are utter turds. Write your own providers with EF or NHibernate as a back end and all will be well. You can choose your own schema as well then. For ref, there is nothing whatsoever wrong with any database in particular for this task.
Nov
7
comment MSMQ for persistence?
@KirkBroadhurst: Indeed I agree. I think NServiceBus kind of bridges the gap here but I won't go further into that as it's 00:08 here and I really should be in bed :)
Nov
7
answered Cannot access my class in WebMatrix (razor) App_Data folder
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