92 reputation
7
bio website
location
age 34
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen Aug 7 at 7:35

Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
22
accepted Common Lisp: defstruct constructors and (declare (type blahblah blah))?
May
22
comment Common Lisp: defstruct constructors and (declare (type blahblah blah))?
The reason is because I'm very into using Lisp's meta-documentation system as much as possible, and SBCL certainly puts type declarations both to enforcement use (when optimize safety is anything other than 0) and documentation when describing a function/method. But I suppose this solution will work too, since it turns out DESCRIBE prints the (check-type ...) expression in the INITFORM, which is good, and more importantly it will show up to any third-party user who's doing scripting and needs to know exactly what legal values can be passed (even failing that, I can always just use docstrings)
May
21
asked Common Lisp: defstruct constructors and (declare (type blahblah blah))?
Dec
7
awarded  Commentator
Dec
7
comment Is it possible to override type-error behavior in Common Lisp upon out-of-range values for limited-range variables?
I didn't consider memory corruption, though I see how the "safety 0" solution might come back to haunt me later even if it is "just working" right now. I think, then, I'll expand upon the custom defun macro I wrote to force-translate ranged types to unranged equivalent ones, and then keep a record of those special clamped parameters in the game's API for functions that have them. I'll then write a customized, API-specific equivalent of 'describe' that does what Lisp's vanilla 'describe' doesn't/can't do, including displaying that kind of parameter detail to end users (scripters/modders).
Nov
28
comment Is it possible to override type-error behavior in Common Lisp upon out-of-range values for limited-range variables?
I think the solution I'll go with will be a combination of your macro suggestion along with sds's mention of (declare (optimize (safety 0))) -- in SBCL at least, safety setting of 0 lets me give a function with a ranged-value parameter an out-of-bounds value for that parameter without an error occuring, and still showing the proper (INTEGER -100 100) type declaration when using the DESCRIBE function. So I can then, as you suggest, write a custom-made "enhanced defun" macro that defines functions with that 0 safety setting and then inserts the custom clamping code into the function's prologue.
Nov
26
comment Is it possible to override type-error behavior in Common Lisp upon out-of-range values for limited-range variables?
I wasn't able to put properly-formatted code in this reply, so I edited my original post to explain the clamp function. I didn't want the type declaration to be ignored, but rather so it would behave differently instead of calling an error if an integer was out of boundaries of a ranged-integer type declaration. I prefer having (INTEGER [min] [max]) type declarations because it helps the compiler in certain optimizations, and also helps with the whole "self documenting code" idea when doing (describe 'foobar) at the REPL, which will then faithfully describe that parameter's type declaration.
Nov
26
revised Is it possible to override type-error behavior in Common Lisp upon out-of-range values for limited-range variables?
added 776 characters in body
Nov
26
asked Is it possible to override type-error behavior in Common Lisp upon out-of-range values for limited-range variables?
Jan
10
comment OpenGL always returning identity matrix for glGetFloatv GL_MODELVIEW_MATRIX in cl-opengl (Common Lisp)
@Baggers that was the 2001 thread I had mentioned originally which ended with the "nevermind, found it, and I'm not sharing with anyone what I did to fix it lol XD" conclusion. I wish technical support forums had rules against that kind of thing as much as they emphasize rules against trolling, flamewars, racism, etc.. Anyway, this morning I found out what was going on, and followed up my question with an answer that is hopefully informative to whoever Googles this same problem in the future some time in the year 2023 :)
Jan
10
awarded  Teacher
Jan
10
answered OpenGL always returning identity matrix for glGetFloatv GL_MODELVIEW_MATRIX in cl-opengl (Common Lisp)
Jan
10
asked OpenGL always returning identity matrix for glGetFloatv GL_MODELVIEW_MATRIX in cl-opengl (Common Lisp)
Jan
6
comment Eliminating “mystery-consing” in this Common Lisp function?
@FaheemMitha -- I think when it inlines, SBCL finds an optimization path to just put all the resulting values into where they inevitably are, whereas it doesn't "see" that chance to optimize when a function isn't inline (just an educated guess/speculation, of course). WRT pre-existing objects, yes -- it's ideal to do this in any language that doesn't default to returning results on the stack. WRT GC bug, I can't say I've ever seen that, but I've been using the Windows-threads port; also that bug link goes to 1.0.57, which was quite a long time ago. Try one of the newer 1.1.x SBCLs, perhaps?
Jan
5
comment Eliminating “mystery-consing” in this Common Lisp function?
@FaheemMitha I should also add, I now approach "calculate multiple things" scenarios like this differently than I did in September when I made this question; instead of returning a multiple-values thing with 'values', I have such a function plop the output into an output object (like an array or struct) which is expected to already exist, and declare types as much as possible both in the function as well as in the declaration of the passed output object -- SBCL seems to do a relatively decent (though still not 100% perfect) job of optimizing code in which types are thoroughly declared.
Jan
5
awarded  Editor
Jan
5
revised Eliminating “mystery-consing” in this Common Lisp function?
added 1905 characters in body
Jan
5
comment Eliminating “mystery-consing” in this Common Lisp function?
@FaheemMitha Pretty much just after doing a (declaim (inline calculate-wall-points)), I remember I saw vastly lower consing going on in the profiler between it and the function that uses (used) it. I will post the code to the function that used it in a separate answer. I don't know if you'll need even more code to mess with it, since it also references a couple functions and global variables beyond its scope.
Sep
2
awarded  Supporter