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20h
comment Generating a random, non-repeating sequence of all integers in .NET
@GabrielS. Use the seed as key. Then encrypt a counter. Unique inputs produce unique outputs and a counter is obviously unique.
1d
comment Is it possible to crack/determine the type of hashing or encryption if infinite strings are given?
If the encryption is any good, known plaintext / ciphertext pairs won't help you at all.
Feb
4
revised Javascript to generate random password with specific number of letters
added 81 characters in body
Feb
4
comment Javascript to generate random password with specific number of letters
@ShreevatsaR I considered rejection based sampling instead, but chose this approach for its simplicity, despite the slight bias and the performance impact. For my similar C# code I switched to 64 bit integers to further reduce the bias, but that's tricky to do in javascript.
Jan
31
revised A way of bruteforcing a hash value without the use of file
added 425 characters in body
Jan
31
answered A way of bruteforcing a hash value without the use of file
Jan
31
revised Generating a random, non-repeating sequence of all integers in .NET
deleted 91 characters in body
Jan
31
comment Generating a random, non-repeating sequence of all integers in .NET
"it would get ridiculously slow when generating the last numbers in the sequence" while this is true, the total runtime is still only n log(n). Keeping track of duplicates using a bitfield would take 2^32 bits = 512 MiB, so it might not fail your memory requirements.
Jan
31
revised Generating a random, non-repeating sequence of all integers in .NET
added 293 characters in body
Jan
31
comment Generating a random, non-repeating sequence of all integers in .NET
Related question: How to obfuscate an integer?
Jan
31
answered Generating a random, non-repeating sequence of all integers in .NET
Jan
29
revised How to remove elements from a generic list while iterating over it?
added 2 characters in body
Jan
26
comment How to use UMAC? (UHash24)
3 byte MACs are inherently weak, since you have a 1 in 16 million chance of guessing a correct authentication tag. For polynomial hashes, such a correct guess will not only give you a forged message, but it'll also let you recover part of the key. => Don't use polynomial MACs for short tags, they're even weaker than other short-tag MACs (like truncated HMAC)
Jan
26
comment C# Encryption with XSalsa20 and Poly1305
As far as I can tell, this code should be identical to XSalsa20Poly1305.Encrypt(), since Chaos.NaCl doesn't expose that zero padding.
Jan
23
revised SIMD instructions for floating point equality comparison (with NaN == NaN)
deleted 343 characters in body
Jan
23
revised SIMD instructions for floating point equality comparison (with NaN == NaN)
added 343 characters in body
Jan
22
revised SIMD instructions for floating point equality comparison (with NaN == NaN)
added 249 characters in body
Jan
22
revised SIMD instructions for floating point equality comparison (with NaN == NaN)
added 238 characters in body
Jan
22
revised SIMD instructions for floating point equality comparison (with NaN == NaN)
added 238 characters in body
Jan
22
revised SIMD instructions for floating point equality comparison (with NaN == NaN)
added 518 characters in body