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bio website github.com/CodesInChaos
location Frankfurt, Germany
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visits member for 4 years
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Mar
5
comment Why is 1 && 2 in C# false?
Even today processors work with these instructions. The abstraction of having a bool different from int doesn't cost any performance, but makes the language cleaner. Just like there is no difference between a pointer and an integer as far as the processor is concerned. But it still makes sense to separate those in a language. It's the usual case that if you are too familiar with something you are blind to alternatives, even if the alternative is better. Unfortunately that happens to all of us more often than we'd like.
Mar
5
comment Why does C# && and || operators work the way they do?
true||false==true and false||false==false So you don't know what the result of unknown||false is. So you need to use null which indicates an unknown result. You might want to look into lifted operators on Nullable<T> which have similar properties. The idea is to work with unknown values(represented by null) just like you'd work with normal values. And at least it allows us to overload && in a short-circuiting way. Unlike C++ where && short-circuits on built in types but doesn't on user defined types.
Mar
5
comment Why does C# && and || operators work the way they do?
And then there is the Engineer vs Scientist, "How?" vs "Why?". I for one value the "Why?" much higher. If you know the why the how usually becomes trivial. The flip side of this is that I have a hard time using something I don't really understand.
Mar
5
comment Why does C# && and || operators work the way they do?
I learned c after knowing pascal. Pascal has only a single and operator which is logical(and short circuiting) on booleans, and binary on integers. So when switching to c I had something like the opposite problem of yours. Why the hell does c have no booleans and uses two kinds of and instead? You can get used to something so much that you stop questioning the why. If you start from the definition that && is the short-circuiting and then your question makes no sense, if you start with logical vs binary it does.
Mar
5
comment Why does C# && and || operators work the way they do?
@acid Put in both true and false instead of null. In the && example you get false in both cases. So you can safely say the result if false. In the || example you get true once and false once. So the result is undefined and thus null. So it makes sense this way.
Mar
5
comment Why does C# && and || operators work the way they do?
@archer That's a natural thing to do. If a language departs from what older languages does it usually has a reason for doing so. Being different for the sake of being different is usually not a good idea. And knowing why something works like it does is almost as important as knowing how something works.
Mar
5
comment Why is 1 && 2 in C# false?
using logical operators on integers doesn't really make sense @acid. It's just a work around for c's weak type system.
Mar
5
revised Why does C# && and || operators work the way they do?
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Mar
5
comment Why is 1 && 2 in C# false?
And the problem with your type isn't the incorrect implementation of & it is the incorrect implementation of true and false. Those operators should not exist on a non logical type. See my answer to your old question on why these operators are designed like this in C#.
Mar
5
comment Why is 1 && 2 in C# false?
@acid && isn't a short circuit bitwise on any reasonable type. The core of your problem is the misunderstanding that & means bitwise and in C#. It doesn't. It means non short-circuiting and.
Mar
5
answered Why does C# && and || operators work the way they do?
Mar
5
comment How does operator overloading of true and false work?
@acid My answer had a big mistake. Perhaps that confused you.
Mar
5
revised How does operator overloading of true and false work?
added 8 characters in body
Mar
5
answered How does operator overloading of true and false work?
Mar
5
answered Who can decode this code?
Mar
5
revised Why cant i overload the += operator in C#? But i still can use it?
added 229 characters in body; added 220 characters in body
Mar
5
answered Why cant i overload the += operator in C#? But i still can use it?
Mar
4
revised How to convert a message from a WH_KEYBOARD_LL to corespondig unicode char
added 8 characters in body; edited title
Mar
4
comment Hook keyboard from injected DLL using KeyboardProc / SetWindowsHookEx
Do you want a global hotkey or only one that works if the current thread receives input?
Mar
4
comment Which encryption algorithm is useful for encrypting a file stored on disk?
I don't think RSA fits this problem at all.