20,193 reputation
43466
bio website smokingkangaroo.com
location Melbourne, Australia
age 31
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen yesterday

1d
answered Why Nothing >> Just 3 is Nothing in Haskell?
2d
awarded  Necromancer
Apr
15
comment How to compose objects that are purely side effects?
I'd favour option 1. You're not polluting the constructor signatures "unnecessarily"; both classes do need to be told about an A, and the most straightforward and flexible way to do that is for it to be passed in from the outside. Hiding this dependency on A might make your constructor signatures appear less complex, but it doesn't make the overall architecture/design less complex, and it does make it less obvious.
Apr
10
awarded  Populist
Apr
3
comment Using Type Nats to create a type level list (having problems adding numbers on the type level)
When I've tried to use the type-level Nat stuff in 7.8, the problem I ran into was that while it now works for fixed finite Nats (e.g. it can work out that List (0 + (1 + (1 + 1))) is List 3 Char), when you try to write generic operations like <++> :: List n a -> List m a -> List (n + m) a you get errors like Could not deduce (((n1 + m) + 1) ~ (n + m)) from the context (n ~ (n1 + 1)). So it seems like there's still more work needed before it can really replace the Zero/Succ based approaches - although I'm far from expert, so maybe I'm missing something.
Apr
2
answered What is the point of using Monad in a program?
Apr
1
revised How to replace __str__ for a function
added 764 characters in body
Apr
1
answered How to replace __str__ for a function
Mar
31
comment What are the functional programming languages that easily integrates with C
@rank1 Probably, sadly. It's a good question in principle, but it's the "easily" part that makes it difficult to get away from opinion. And C's kindof the "lowest common denominator" of programming languages, so most anything that has an FFI at all will be able to talk to C; that means that if you change the question to ask what languages can integrate with C at all the answer will probably be a not-very-insightful "all of them".
Mar
31
comment Why are (constant) expressions not evaluated at compile time in Haskell?
@ChrisJester-Young Well, Haskell has "non-strict semantics". It's not allowed to fail to terminate on programs that lazy evaluation would allow to terminate, but it doesn't actually have to use lazy evaluation, and it doesn't even have to use the same evaluation strategy for all "constants".
Mar
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
24
comment Force python class member variable to be specific type
@jsbueno That's exactly what I was saying?
Mar
23
comment Force python class member variable to be specific type
@jsbueno My point was that the ugly hacking is always possible (and generally not very difficult), if you've set your mind to it. So it won't stop people playing by the rules declared in your documentation, who aren't trying to access the private variable directly anyway, and it won't stop people who have decided (for wherever reason) that they need to get around the rules.
Mar
23
comment Is nested pair a good idea in Haskell
@mb14 That's why someone wrote a library to provide convenient pred-defined operations (and why it doesn't actually use nested tuples). :) The whole point is "hey, Haskell's features are sufficient for this to be possible; now let's build a library around making it practical".
Mar
23
revised Is nested pair a good idea in Haskell
added 130 characters in body
Mar
23
answered Is nested pair a good idea in Haskell
Mar
20
comment How to generate random array in Haskell?
unsafePerformIO won't actually solve the OP's problem, though. Certainly not without more information than you've provided. Using unsafePerformIO in a list comprehension as in the OP's code is unlikely to result in getting an array of random numbers, unless you craft your code very carefully with quite a deep understanding of how GHC compiles and executes Haskell code.
Mar
19
comment Strange GHCi lazy evaluation
@is7s Does the behavior change? The result doesn't. GHC is "allowed" to use any evaluation strategy it likes that doesn't change the result. :sp is peeking into implementation details that aren't normally "exposed". I too would be interested in a note on what the tuple construction achieves for GHC, though.
Mar
18
comment What are the key differences between Java 8's Optional, Scala's Option and Haskell's Maybe?
Flattening is exactly what join does to type (what "flattening the type" means depends on the monad in question, but it's still a nice general statement you can make about all monads). The name "flatten" also conveys (closer to) the correct intuition for containerish monads like List, whereas "join" sounds like "append". Since bind/flatMap is equivalent to "map and then join", I think there's actually a good argument that we would be best off calling join flatten in the programmer's context (much like we call unit return), and calling bind flatMap.
Mar
16
answered Exceptions as public classes vs. public static inner classes