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Oct
22
comment Using Maybe helpers with If statement Haskell
Cool, just checking that wasn't related.
Oct
21
comment Using Maybe helpers with If statement Haskell
I hope you realise that snd(last(b)) doesn't get you "the second last element in a list of pairs", but rather "the second element of the last pair in a list of pairs"? e.g. in [(1, 11), (2, 22), (3, 33)] the second last pair would be (2, 22), but what snd(last(b)) would actually extract is 33.
Oct
21
answered Why type constraint is not enough?
Oct
21
comment Ambiguous type variable but not in ghci?
@DavidUnric A generic type is enough to calculate a list's length, which is why the standard length function doesn't have an Eq constraint! When you added the Eq constraint to your version, you specifically declared to GHC that it needs to come up with an Eq instance to be able to call the function. It can't do that without knowing what type a is (or being passed something of the smae type that also has the constraint). It assumes you meant what you said, rather than looking inside the definition of length' to see that you didn't 'really" need the instance, so it errors out.
Oct
17
comment What does “⊥” mean in “The Strictness Monad” from P. Wadler's paper?
Except that in a lazy functional language, f x can be defined even if x is undefined! e.g. if f = const 1. Wadler is not merely observing that a function's result is undefined if it's input is undefined (since that's not always true), he's defining the function strict that converts any function to have this property.
Oct
11
awarded  Good Answer
Oct
9
answered Why does this instance fail the coverage condition?
Oct
7
comment Haskell - Non-exhaustive patterns in function
@Aserian A pattern that matches any list is ys. The type says that it's a list; you don't need to use any special notation in the variable to indicate it's a list. y:ys can only be "something consed onto something"; there's no way for that expression to end up equal to [], no matter what values you choose for y and ys.
Oct
6
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
6
comment Annotating Nested ADT in Haskell with Additional Data
Maybe try data Exp a = Var Identifier a | ...? Then functions that can pass-through annotations but don't actually use them would be polymorphic in the a, ones that can't handle annotations would use Exp (), to annotate you have functions of type Exp () -> Exp ExtraInfo, and your transformations that need the extra info would use Exp ExtraInfo. It's basically the "keep it around all the time" option, but with the type checker able to enforce the phases where you're using it.
Oct
2
comment Using forgiveness than permission
@HelloAllWorld Yes, in that the dictionary[a] lookup is the part that (1) can fail and (2) is guarded by checking if a not in dictionary.
Oct
2
comment Using forgiveness than permission
@HelloAllWorld My first two examples are not the same as your code. I wrote them as examples of contrasting permission/forgiveness style code. Your examples are neither permission nor forgiveness styles, so they couldn't be used to show you what the permission/forgiveness thing is actually about.
Oct
1
answered Using forgiveness than permission
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
25
answered haskell data definition error - Illegal literal in type (use -XDataKinds to enable)
Sep
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
24
answered what does Haskell's <|> operator do?
Sep
21
comment Testing Monadic Code
That's a useful way of thinking about a lot of monads, but it's not true of monads in general. The list monad doesn't defer computation until you call a "trap door" function (except due to laziness). It's only the monads which provide implicit access to some sort of environment that necessarily work the way you describe, and that's because e.g. a Rand StdGen Int represents a "probabilistic integer", which needs a StdGen to be provided to select a concrete Int from all the values it could be.
Sep
21
comment The purpose of type classes in Haskell vs the purpose of traits in Scala
It's worth noting that it's not just type classes that are only a compile time feature of Haskell; basically all type-level features are completely checked/resolved during compilation. Haskell's type system is based on quite a different "philosophy" of what types are.