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Jul
1
comment Integer.parseint in java , exception
It seems impossible to get a DecimalFormat that can parse "+1" as 1, "-1" as -1, and "0" as 0.
Jul
1
awarded  Informed
Jun
30
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
30
revised What is the category-theoretical basis for the requirement that the Haskell “id” function must return the same value as passed in?
fix formatting
Jun
30
comment What is the category-theoretical basis for the requirement that the Haskell “id” function must return the same value as passed in?
@nclark If category theory defined mophism equality in detail, you wouldn't be able to model as many things as categories. The entire point of category theory is to say that a category is any collection of objects and morphisms, where morphisms can be composed, there is an identity morphism for every object, and the category laws hold. Any other properties of equality are deliberately left undefined, so theories of category theory cannot rely on other properties but are true regardless of what they are; exactly the same way as the idea of "composition" is left undefined.
Jun
30
comment What is the category-theoretical basis for the requirement that the Haskell “id” function must return the same value as passed in?
@nclark Actually category theory does say more about equality of morphisms, but only what's contained on the category laws: id . f = f, f . id = f, and f . (g . h) = (f . g) . h. But your idea that two morphisms are interchangeable if they are between the same objects does not follow (and is not generally true, though it could be for some specific categories).
Jun
30
comment What is the category-theoretical basis for the requirement that the Haskell “id” function must return the same value as passed in?
@nclark Basically for objects, A == A and A != B, and also for morphisms f == f and f != g. But there's nothing that says if two morphisms have the same domain and codomain then they must be the same morphism; that's an additional assumption you're making, which doesn't have to follow.
Jun
30
answered What is the category-theoretical basis for the requirement that the Haskell “id” function must return the same value as passed in?
Jun
29
comment Does GHC make a new copy of an object when deconstructing and reconstructing it?
@Ramith That destroys laziness unfortunately; all of the calls on the path down to the leaf node would have to wait for the ultimate call to return before they'd know whether they're returning a reference to an existing constructor node or allocating a new one, which means forcing the root step forces everything. So if you ever want to choose between those properties (laziness vs avoiding reconstruction of identical trees), then it needs to be explicitly programmed (such as via the Maybe (Tree a) helper) rather than implicit behaviour of the compiler.
Jun
25
awarded  Necromancer
Jun
24
comment Why is “1.real” a syntax error but “1 .real” valid in Python?
@user2357112 From brief experimentation, Ruby allows 1.real by disallowing 1. as syntax for a floating point number. So 1.e4 can only be a call of the e4 method on 1.
Jun
24
comment python map string split list
@Vignesh "For calling behaviour more complex than this, I would use a list comprehension". The thing you're mapping over the list has to be callable with one argument. You can always wrap the split method call in a new function (possibly defined inline using lambda), in order to make something that can be called with one argument and which will also pass the additional separator argument. But that usually ends up less readable than [x.split('\t') for x in a], unless it's something you would have defined and named anyway.
Jun
3
awarded  Good Answer
May
30
answered Naming conflict between field values and local scope in Haskell
May
29
comment How to define Eq instance of List without GADTs or Datatype Contexts
Try actually using Cons 1 Nil :: List Int, instead of just Nil :: List Int; you'll still get an error about No instance for (Equal Int). The problem is that you haven't defined how you can use Int with =+= before trying to use List Int with =+=; this has nothing to do with whether you use the GADT approach or the constraint-on-the-instance approach. The GADT approach does not remove the burden of proving that the elements in the list can be compared for equality, it just moves the burden of proof from the use sites of == to the construction sites of your lists.
May
29
answered How to define Eq instance of List without GADTs or Datatype Contexts
May
24
revised Haskell Function Definition without ->
deleted 10 characters in body
May
24
answered Haskell Function Definition without ->
May
23
answered The relationship between type classes - dependency vs using instance
May
21
answered A little confusion with the sorted function in Haskell