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6h
answered Algebraic Data Types and Equality
9h
revised What exactly is the kind “*” in Haskell?
added 16 characters in body
9h
answered What exactly is the kind “*” in Haskell?
Nov
20
answered Object Oriented Polymorphism in Haskell
Nov
19
comment Type inference interferes with referential transparency
Haskell will never under any circumstances choose method #1 for you. It will either do all the operations as Integer and end up with an Integer or do all the operations as Int and end up with an Int. There will be no conversion unless you call conversion functions explicitly, which is writing a different program.
Nov
19
awarded  Guru
Nov
17
awarded  Good Answer
Nov
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
12
comment Haskell Simple program pattern matching error
If it's intended to match a list with exactly one element, why not write change [x] as Lee suggested? (Or change (x:[]) if you really must use the : directly). Much clearer for each equation to say what it means without relying on ordering where this is easy, and it's conventional to put the base cases above the recursive case.
Nov
11
comment Haskell- Create a method acting on different types
You're not putting different data types in a list, here. You have only one data type: Shape. Shape has 4 different cases, and parameter pattern matching is exactly how you tell which case you have. Using typeOf wouldn't make sense here.
Nov
10
comment Constraint Inference from Instances
@ChristianConkle Coming up with a Num instance inside a function (not declared in the interface via a constraint) would require knowing the type so that you can find the instance. Since f is polymorphic, it can be invoked on different types at different times, so the switch on the type would have to be performed at runtime (which is impossible, because types don't exist at all at runtime, let alone a complete dictionary mapping types to Num instances). Does that answer your question?
Nov
9
answered Constraint Inference from Instances
Nov
7
answered Why should we use Behavior in FRP
Nov
4
comment Why is assigning the result of print an invalid syntax?
@njzk2 Nope, just an old mistake in the language design. That's why they fixed it in Python 3, where print is an ordinary function, not dedicated syntax.
Oct
30
awarded  Good Answer
Oct
22
comment Using Maybe helpers with If statement Haskell
Cool, just checking that wasn't related.
Oct
21
comment Using Maybe helpers with If statement Haskell
I hope you realise that snd(last(b)) doesn't get you "the second last element in a list of pairs", but rather "the second element of the last pair in a list of pairs"? e.g. in [(1, 11), (2, 22), (3, 33)] the second last pair would be (2, 22), but what snd(last(b)) would actually extract is 33.
Oct
21
answered Why type constraint is not enough?
Oct
21
comment Ambiguous type variable but not in ghci?
@DavidUnric A generic type is enough to calculate a list's length, which is why the standard length function doesn't have an Eq constraint! When you added the Eq constraint to your version, you specifically declared to GHC that it needs to come up with an Eq instance to be able to call the function. It can't do that without knowing what type a is (or being passed something of the smae type that also has the constraint). It assumes you meant what you said, rather than looking inside the definition of length' to see that you didn't 'really" need the instance, so it errors out.
Oct
17
comment What does “⊥” mean in “The Strictness Monad” from P. Wadler's paper?
Except that in a lazy functional language, f x can be defined even if x is undefined! e.g. if f = const 1. Wadler is not merely observing that a function's result is undefined if it's input is undefined (since that's not always true), he's defining the function strict that converts any function to have this property.