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1d
comment Unescaping unicode literals found in Haskell Strings
Note that unescapeJava doesn't translate \\u0073 to \u0073, so that it displays as s. It's not "removing a backslash" or anything like that. The 6 character sequence \u0073 is (one) way of representing the character s in Java source code. Whereas \\u0073 is a 7 character sequence for representing the 6 character sequence \u0073 in Java source code. So unesacpeJava translates the 6 characters \u0073 to s, and then there's no need for any special handling to display it as s.
2d
awarded  Nice Answer
2d
awarded  haskell
2d
comment Can you partially constrain a type in Haskell?
I've written up and accepted my own answer because it's exactly what I was looking for 3 years ago. The other answers are still very useful for older versions of GHC.
2d
accepted Can you partially constrain a type in Haskell?
2d
answered Can you partially constrain a type in Haskell?
Feb
5
comment Dynamically select which subclass to inherit methods from?
If we're going to pick on whether the solution preserves things like isinstance and issubclass, it's worth noting that with this solution every single object created by SomeClass(...) will now be an instance of its own freshly-created class. Whether any of this matters at all is a matter for the OP's use case, not something that can be decided by a general rule.
Feb
4
comment Dynamically select which subclass to inherit methods from?
Don't pretend to be a class. You can't use it with isinstance, can't subclass it, etc etc. "A thing you can can call to get an object" is only a tiny part of what it is to be a class, but it's exactly what it is to be a function. Just be a function.
Feb
4
comment Haskell: all names in Haskell are immutable? No difference between array and list?
Part of the point is that there is a sense in which you can do pure computations with IO in Haskell, separate from executing them. They're first class values, and when you're just building them and passing them around all the usual laws about pure Haskell code applies (see especially when you apply monad-generic functions to IO actions). It's only the execution of main that is different, and it's not hard to see that as "external" since no language facilities in Haskell can actually talk about it (other than defining main).
Feb
1
comment Why is IntSet lookup O(min(n,W)), and not O(1)?
You can't even compare your input integer to a single integer from your set in constant time if you're actually considering the log(n) factors of unbounded integers.
Jan
28
comment Difference between deriving typeclass and creating an instance
@BalinKingOfMoria I've promoted it to one
Jan
28
answered Difference between deriving typeclass and creating an instance
Jan
28
awarded  Famous Question
Jan
28
comment What is Applicative Functor definition from the category theory POV?
Yes, if you can add a bit on what "strength" means here it would be clarifying; especially since leftaroundabout's answer links to en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monoidal_functor which appears to define "strong monoidal functors" to mean "monoidal functor with some constraints assumed" and "lax monoidal functors" to mean "no additional assumptions", so in that terminology "strong lax monoidal functor" doesn't seem to make sense.
Jan
28
comment How to get cabal and nix work together
@ErikAllik We're "in the future" in that haskellng is now just the standard way of packaging haskell stuff in nixpkgs (took me a while to figure that out when I recently jumped to nixos; there's so many tutorials telling you to use haskellng). I tried stack+nix, since I was using stack without nix and it has some integration, but have so far concluded I prefer cabal+nix; nix itself provides the sandboxing, lts package sets, and ability to depend on non-haskell projects, and I'm finding it easier to just work with nix-shell than to mix in stack exec as well.
Jan
27
revised Why does the following typecheck?
fixed alignment messed up by typing on my phone
Jan
27
answered Why does the following typecheck?
Jan
25
awarded  Famous Question
Jan
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
21
comment Monad more powerful than Applicative?
I think the root of your misunderstanding is this: An f (a -> b) is not actually an a -> b wrapped up in an f. It's not "a house in which there is a hammer". It's a thing that is related to a -> b, but it may or may not contain one. There are perfectly fine applicatives that sometimes don't contain a value of their type parameter, that contain many of them, that contain a way to produce them from other information they don't contain, or even that never contain such a value. You've got a house with a picture of a hammer on it, and the door is locked.