22,516 reputation
44274
bio website smokingkangaroo.com
location Melbourne, Australia
age 31
visits member for 4 years
seen 26 secs ago

Sep
17
answered Ambigous instance resolution in Haskell
Sep
17
awarded  Yearling
Sep
16
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
29
awarded  Good Question
Aug
22
awarded  Enlightened
Aug
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
18
comment Function composition and $ - one compiles, another doesn't
@AlexanderSupertramp Well, it's completely stripped away during compilation; it doesn't even exist when the expression is being evaluated at runtime. But I'm not sure that's what you meant by "when the expression is evaluated"? It's just extra information the compiler can use to decide whether the program is well-typed or not.
Jul
18
comment Function composition and $ - one compiles, another doesn't
@AlexanderSupertramp (Also "casting" isn't what it does; foo :: bar is just a declaration that foo has type bar; this declaration can be either true or false, but it doesn't change the type of foo)
Jul
18
comment Function composition and $ - one compiles, another doesn't
@AlexanderSupertramp :: isn't properly an operator, it's a piece of syntax. If it were an operator you'd be able to say let weird = (::) in weird value type instead of value :: type; you can't. Anywhere you can have a value expression you can also have value :: type, and it attaches "as far out" as it can without producing a syntax error. So you can think of it as being "even lower precedence" than $, but it's not really the same thing as normal operator precedence that causes it to do this.
Jul
16
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
16
awarded  Necromancer
Jul
15
comment How do you escape strings for SQLite table/column names in Python?
@Michael Nothing. I was merely citing psycopg2 as a reasonably respected source who agrees with the contention in the rest of my post; that ordinary string templating operations are usually sufficient for inserting table/column names into queries.
Jul
12
comment Can Haskell make distinctions for different kinds of IO
@PabloGrisafi If you've logged the inputs you received (IO) and the actions you took (IO), and the rest is pure computation, then that's enough information. Pure computations (no matter how much code is involved) always produce the same output for a given input. So once you're aware that there was a failure in production and have tracked it down to a Haskell system taking the wrong action in response to correct input, you have a test case you can reproduce in dev with full debugging facilities to see how it computed the action to take incorrectly.
Jul
12
answered Functors don’t work with data types that require specific types
Jul
8
comment Haskell: Lazy vs. Strict Text values, which one is recommended when?
The conclusion I reach from the quotes you've given is the opposite; both are sufficient for most purposes, lazy is much better for some purposes, strict is slightly better for others. Therefore it would make sense to reach for lazy by default to avoid the situation where the wrong choice makes a big difference, and if I end up I the situation where I need to optimise for a few percent more performance (after exhausting all the easy bigger optimizations, presumably) then moving to strict can be one of the options I look at.
Jul
4
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
3
answered Type unification with multi-parameter type classes
Jul
3
answered Haskell Type Variable