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1d
revised Is there significance in the order of Haskell function parameters?
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1d
comment Is there significance in the order of Haskell function parameters?
@luqui Yes, but there are other reasons for their parameter order. div and mod are too related to existing symbology from mathematics (and other programming languages) to want to reverse the order. Plus with infix operator it's pretty much as easy to leave out the first argument as the second.
1d
answered Is there significance in the order of Haskell function parameters?
Jul
27
comment What is Ord type?
Yes, we really need a less clunky term than "type-level thing" for "the things we can use in type expressions, whether or not they could be the types of values". Otherwise shorthand is inevitable. The context-dependency of the word "type" seems to work out fine for experts, but it makes it very difficult to pick this stuff up organically.
Jul
23
revised What is Ord type?
added 807 characters in body
Jul
23
answered What is Ord type?
Jul
22
answered Why can't I make Either instance of Functor using id in Haskell?
Jul
18
answered Copyright issues while using public data in books
Jul
15
comment Why does “not(True) in [False, True]” return False?
@Texom512: I would also recommend never writing not(True); prefer not True. The first makes it look like a function call, which is where your confusion came from; if not was a function, then not(True) in ... couldn't possibly be not ((True) in ...). You have to know it's an operator (or you end up in situations like this), so you should write it like an operator, not disguise it as a function.
Jul
7
comment Which language extensions enable to write “class A (B c) => D c where …” ? What is the meaning of this type class declaration?
@jhegedus I'm not sure that you'll find much more of the meaning of specifically the type class constraints that you can write with FlexibleContexts; even the GHC documentation for the FlexibleContexts extension (which you quote and link to) doesn't say much about what the constraints mean, just about the now-allowed form of the constraints. The reason is that the constraints still mean exactly the same thing as they always did ("there must be an instance matching this constraint when you use the thing I'm declaring"), you can just use more flexible rules for defining the constraints.
Jul
7
comment Which language extensions enable to write “class A (B c) => D c where …” ? What is the meaning of this type class declaration?
@jhegedus The rule is just that in a class declaration the stuff before the => is specifying constraints that must hold for every instance of the class that is declared. All I need to know is how to read a constraint (every Haskell text or tutorial that covers type classes at all will go over the basics of this), and that specifically for class declarations it's a constraint that must be satisfied for every instance. That's true whether the constraint is one allowed by Haskell 98 or a more advanced one.
Jul
7
comment Which language extensions enable to write “class A (B c) => D c where …” ? What is the meaning of this type class declaration?
@jhegedus I can't remember off the top of my head. You can definitely write things like class Eq a => Eq (Maybe a) though. There's not really any new concepts involved in saying class Eq (Maybe a) => Eq a instead, whether or not it's Haskell 98.
Jul
7
comment Which language extensions enable to write “class A (B c) => D c where …” ? What is the meaning of this type class declaration?
@jhegedus That's just ordinary type class constraint syntax. Its meaning doesn't really change when type families are involved (type families just adds more kinds of things you can mention in constraints). class Functor (F a) => Funky a just means that for all instances declared for the Funky class there must be a Functor instance for F a (for the same a). This is no different from how class Eq a => Ord a means that for all instances of Ord there must be an instance of Eq.
Jul
1
comment Integer.parseint in Java, exception when '+' comes first
It seems impossible to get a DecimalFormat that can parse "+1" as 1, "-1" as -1, and "0" as 0.
Jul
1
awarded  Informed
Jun
30
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
30
revised What is the category-theoretical basis for the requirement that the Haskell “id” function must return the same value as passed in?
fix formatting
Jun
30
comment What is the category-theoretical basis for the requirement that the Haskell “id” function must return the same value as passed in?
@nclark If category theory defined mophism equality in detail, you wouldn't be able to model as many things as categories. The entire point of category theory is to say that a category is any collection of objects and morphisms, where morphisms can be composed, there is an identity morphism for every object, and the category laws hold. Any other properties of equality are deliberately left undefined, so theories of category theory cannot rely on other properties but are true regardless of what they are; exactly the same way as the idea of "composition" is left undefined.
Jun
30
comment What is the category-theoretical basis for the requirement that the Haskell “id” function must return the same value as passed in?
@nclark Actually category theory does say more about equality of morphisms, but only what's contained on the category laws: id . f = f, f . id = f, and f . (g . h) = (f . g) . h. But your idea that two morphisms are interchangeable if they are between the same objects does not follow (and is not generally true, though it could be for some specific categories).
Jun
30
comment What is the category-theoretical basis for the requirement that the Haskell “id” function must return the same value as passed in?
@nclark Basically for objects, A == A and A != B, and also for morphisms f == f and f != g. But there's nothing that says if two morphisms have the same domain and codomain then they must be the same morphism; that's an additional assumption you're making, which doesn't have to follow.