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awarded  Explainer
Sep
25
answered haskell data definition error - Illegal literal in type (use -XDataKinds to enable)
Sep
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
24
answered what does Haskell's <|> operator do?
Sep
21
comment Testing Monadic Code
That's a useful way of thinking about a lot of monads, but it's not true of monads in general. The list monad doesn't defer computation until you call a "trap door" function (except due to laziness). It's only the monads which provide implicit access to some sort of environment that necessarily work the way you describe, and that's because e.g. a Rand StdGen Int represents a "probabilistic integer", which needs a StdGen to be provided to select a concrete Int from all the values it could be.
Sep
21
comment The purpose of type classes in Haskell vs the purpose of traits in Scala
It's worth noting that it's not just type classes that are only a compile time feature of Haskell; basically all type-level features are completely checked/resolved during compilation. Haskell's type system is based on quite a different "philosophy" of what types are.
Sep
21
answered Partial application in haskell with multiple arguments
Sep
17
answered Ambigous instance resolution in Haskell
Sep
17
awarded  Yearling
Sep
16
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
29
awarded  Good Question
Aug
22
awarded  Enlightened
Aug
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
18
comment Function composition and $ - one compiles, another doesn't
@AlexanderSupertramp Well, it's completely stripped away during compilation; it doesn't even exist when the expression is being evaluated at runtime. But I'm not sure that's what you meant by "when the expression is evaluated"? It's just extra information the compiler can use to decide whether the program is well-typed or not.
Jul
18
comment Function composition and $ - one compiles, another doesn't
@AlexanderSupertramp (Also "casting" isn't what it does; foo :: bar is just a declaration that foo has type bar; this declaration can be either true or false, but it doesn't change the type of foo)
Jul
18
comment Function composition and $ - one compiles, another doesn't
@AlexanderSupertramp :: isn't properly an operator, it's a piece of syntax. If it were an operator you'd be able to say let weird = (::) in weird value type instead of value :: type; you can't. Anywhere you can have a value expression you can also have value :: type, and it attaches "as far out" as it can without producing a syntax error. So you can think of it as being "even lower precedence" than $, but it's not really the same thing as normal operator precedence that causes it to do this.
Jul
16
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
16
awarded  Necromancer
Jul
15
comment How do you escape strings for SQLite table/column names in Python?
@Michael Nothing. I was merely citing psycopg2 as a reasonably respected source who agrees with the contention in the rest of my post; that ordinary string templating operations are usually sufficient for inserting table/column names into queries.