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3h
comment Haskell instanceof analogue?
@Hindsight The reason why it's frowned upon is that parametricity has been found to be extremely valuable property for code to have; this is the idea that if your function is polymorphic in some type variable then it uniformly handles all types the same way. This tends to make code much more reusable, composable, and easy to reason about.
3h
comment Pairing adjacent list items in Haskell
Note the "proper" way in the accepted answer doesn't produce exactly the same output as the OP's original zipAdj. The OP's code outputs an extra pair ("blah", ""), guaranteeing that the output has the same length as the input (although by adding an arbitrary "null" element). zip + tail reduces the list length by 1, and maps both empty lists and singleton lists to []. Given that the OP's desired output example doesn't have this extra pair, I doubt that's what he wanted, but it does show that there are potential reasons to want a different definition than the zip + tail version.
Mar
20
comment How is Scala a 'more functional' language than Groovy?
Let us continue this discussion in chat.
Mar
20
comment How is Scala a 'more functional' language than Groovy?
@Orubel I found that not to be the case; the tutorials all used mutability without teaching or showing pure algorithms. The APIs I've interacted with used lots of mutable objects, and outside of basic stdlib lists and maps often didn't provide methods that had all the same functionality with a pure interface. Contrast with Scala; I learned it from the first book listed on Scala's documentation page, which doesn't even mention the concept of mutation until 18 chapters in. Immutability is the default, for built in collections and user-defined classes. Most APIs were largely pure.
Mar
20
comment How is Scala a 'more functional' language than Groovy?
@Orubel Yes, that is exactly my point. If the community around a language encourages functional code (starting with the core language maintainers), then functional APIs proliferate (starting with the standard library), and it's easy to write more functional code. To take your ridiculous straw man argument at face value, if a large community of Volkswagon users (including the manufacturers) encourage you to use them as submarines, top the point that car features and infrastructure are developed supporting that use, then yes they are submarines.
Mar
19
comment How is Scala a 'more functional' language than Groovy?
@Orubel If that's what you got from my answer, then I've failed to communicate very well. My entire point was that for a language "bring functional" and "being OO" is not black and white; it's not about whether Scala has the technical features to support OOP, it's that the standard libraries and the culture that informs "idiomatic Scala" very much favour use of pure functional code for large sections of your program - you are encouraged to use recursion, pattern matching, and monads as parts of your daily toolkit. This is not true of Groovy.
Mar
18
answered Why cannot instances of classes be used as values?
Mar
18
comment Where does the name of Equational Reasoning come from?
@MattElson Does that sort of give you a sense of it? If not, that's probably an excellent question for english.stackexchange.com. :)
Mar
18
comment Where does the name of Equational Reasoning come from?
@MattElson It's meaning is similar to "thinking". "Reasoning about this code" means "thinking about this code", except that it implies a particular focus on wanting to understand how/why it works, or to figure out properties that the code has. I general "reasoning" implies more rigor or productivity than general "thinking". "Thinking about this code" is less specific, since it includes any thought process I have related to this code. If I say "My reasoning is that ..." I'm about to explain to you my thought process; how I arrived at some conclusion.
Mar
18
answered Is it necessary to use IO when importing a foreign function that allocates?
Mar
18
answered Where does the name of Equational Reasoning come from?
Mar
17
comment how to release used memory immediately in python list?
@hsgubert If a is an attribute of some object (member variable), then yes it is referenced by being part of that object (assuming the object itself is referenced somewhere). But if you know you don't need it anymore and you're in a method of that same class, you can just del self.a to get rid of it. If you're not in a method of that class, don't mess with it. Good design almost always keeps each class responsible for managing its own attributes; it's very hard to understand a class if other parts of the program can randomly decide that object doesn't need one of its attributes anymore.
Mar
16
answered Haskell partial applications to add 1 and double
Mar
13
awarded  Good Answer
Mar
11
comment Haskell counting number of function call
@xcoder You can do this by using custom type which stores the function concat and the string arguments, instead of actually applying concat. Then you can count the number of concats in that data structure, and separately also ask for the string that would be produced by actually applying concat. That's basically @dfeur's answer. But without having made special arrangements up front, no there's no way to tell what operations were used to come up with a given value (of any type).
Mar
11
answered Pattern match Haskell Higher order function?
Mar
6
comment Randomness in a nested pure function
@piotrek The point is that all of the functions involved in the other layers of nested calls are also dependent on (and affecting) the random generator state; being explicit about this in the types is a good thing. The functional programming approach to this challenge is to come up with abstractions that make it easy to work these kinds of functions (like Monads). The imperative programming approach to this challenge is to make the information flow implicit.
Mar
5
comment Can GHC warn about the uses of dangerous non-total functions?
Even just redefine them in a module, which you import unqualified as a way of "turning on the warning". You'll then get an ambiguity error pointing you at any places you actually use the Prelude's versions (unless you qualify then, as in Prelude.fromJust). It won't help for partial functions you use from qualified imports of other modules though.
Mar
1
comment Can this multi-parameter type class be simplified?
@aavogt That works perfectly as an answer to this question. I'm not sure how I missed that; I think possibly when I was trying things that simple I was still trying to implement my combined Applicative/Divisible class directly, and in that case got the kind of ambiguous type variable errors I'm talking about. If you want to make that an answer, I'll accept it.
Feb
28
comment Can this multi-parameter type class be simplified?
@aavogt Hmm, I'll give it a go when I've got my dev machine handy. Maybe there's something different I didn't spot.