1,291 reputation
811
bio website ieatpaint.com
location Des Moines, IA
age 34
visits member for 6 years, 1 month
seen Aug 28 '14 at 21:17
I do C# for my job, and Java and Obj-C in my free time, and Scheme, HyperTalk, Inform, and Haskell on rare occasions when I get a particular itch. I'm a Mac guy, but my wife isn't, so I moonlight as a terrible Windows admin. I'm just this guy, you know?

Dec
17
awarded  Yearling
Dec
17
awarded  Yearling
Aug
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
17
awarded  Yearling
Sep
30
awarded  Necromancer
Apr
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
17
awarded  Yearling
Dec
18
awarded  Yearling
Jul
8
comment Why do most programming languages only have binary equality comparison operators?
mquander, that seems terribly pedantic. What does it matter if one reverses the 0 and x if one also reverses the comparator? I'd hope most developers would realize that (0 < x) is the same as (x > 0). Insisting it should be (0 < x) seems even worse than the infamous (null == variable) vs (variable == null), as saying (null == variable) at least has the benefit of helping to prevent typos.
Jun
4
answered If class inherited many times can be slower?
Feb
28
answered Agile development
Feb
17
answered What to do when you go dark?
Feb
4
revised PHP-destroy-session-on-close-of-main-window
edited tags
Jan
21
answered who recommend me a professional computer vision web site so i can ask question in it
Jan
19
comment how to unit test following Method, returning value using “ref”
If ref is the only option, I would have the virtual method also return the value by ref. To be honest, I'm not very familiar with returning by ref, but if I understand correctly, you would set the value of the ref variable to the value of your public field.
Jan
19
answered how to unit test following Method, returning value using “ref”
Jan
15
revised How to make my server work with an iPhone app?
Added a link, clarified answer
Jan
15
answered How to make my server work with an iPhone app?
Dec
18
awarded  Yearling
Nov
23
comment How do I ignore a test based on another test in NUnit?
They're about as isolated as they can be. If you want to 'Get()', you obviously need to 'Put()' first in that same test (or in setup). The isolation comes from the fact that your two tests are testing totally different things - your first tests 'Put()', and your second tests 'Get()'. If 'Put()' fails, they'll both fail - but that's OK. There's no Unit Testing rule that says if one area of the system breaks, it should break exactly one test - it just needs to break at least one test, hopefully one of which specifically tests that area.