87,576 reputation
13118217
bio website jroller.com/tackline
location Edinburgh, Scotland
age 42
visits member for 6 years, 3 months
seen Dec 22 at 18:52

The statements and opinions expressed here are my own and do not necessarily represent those of Oracle Corporation. Oracle does not reflect my views.

Commandments:

  • Please obfuscate your code making it, at best, unobviously broken. Even if the code isn't important.
  • Global state has been a known bad idea for forty years. Please don't do.
  • Corollary of either of the first two commandments: Singletons are pure evil. Don't.
  • Please think about encapsulate. That implies not shoving getters and setters all over the place. Also prefer not use implementation inheritance and avoid protected. Generally limit unnecessary access and implied implementation, even on larger scales.
  • Please practice good dependency hygiene. Yeah it's not interesting, but turns out to be really important for a number of reasons.
  • If you're doing layers of security, please do check each layer individually.
  • Please don't give nulls a meaning. Throw an NPE.

Things that are wrong:

  • "Postel's Law". Good for UI, but for machine interface you wont catch errors and differences fixing mistakes allows TOCTOU-style vulnerabilities.
  • Given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow. Increasing the number of reviewers decreases the depth each one expends on the problem. It's the maximum depth which is crucial unless the problem is trivial in which case who cares.
  • Vulnerabilities are the adversary's fault. Vulnerabilities are the fault of the party that decided to ship the faulty product.

Work: A "Vulnerability Engineer" in the Java SE Security team for Oracle Corporation UK Ltd.

Top advice: If I were you, I wouldn't be starting from here.

Toast advice: Look after the corners and the middle will look after itself.

Me:

In the next few months, I shall be going to:

  • Apr 2015, ACCU, Bristol, UK

Recentish past events:

  • Feb 2014, NorDevCon, Norwich, UK
  • Apr 2014, ACCU, Bristol, UK
  • Aug 2013, DEF CON, Las Vegas, NV
  • Aug 2013, BlackHat USA, Las Vegas, NV
  • Apr 2013, ACCU, Bristol, UK
  • 14-16 Nov 2012, Devoxx, Antwerp
  • Aug 2012, DEF CON, Las Vegas, NV
  • Aug 2012, BlackHat USA, Las Vegas, NV
  • 25-28 Apr 2012, ACCU, Oxford, UK
  • 16-18 Nov 2011, Devoxx, Antwerp
  • 12 Nov 2011, ACCU Autumn Conference, Bletchley Park
  • >14-15 Nov 2011, Stack Overflow Devdays, London
  • 5-7 Aug 2011, DEF CON, Las Vegas, NV
  • 3-4 Aug 2011, BlackHat USA, Las Vegas, NV
  • 13-16 Apr 2011, ACCU, Oxford, UK
  • 12 Apr 2011, "A day of deliberate practice", Oxford, UK
  • 17-19 Nov 2010, Devoxx, Antwerp
  • 14-17 Apr 2010, ACCU, Oxford, UK
  • 18-20 Nov 2009, Devoxx, Antwerp
  • 7 Nov 2009, ACCU Security, Bletchley Park
  • 2 Nov 2009, Stack Overflow DevDay, Amsterdam
  • 28 Oct 2009, Stack Overflow DevDay, London, UK
  • 31-2 Jul/Aug 2009, DEFCON17, Las Vegas, NV
  • 29-30 Jul 2009, BlackHat USA, Las Vegas, NV


Nov
6
comment Selectively Enforcing Synchronization to Facilitate Maximum Concurrency
@yshavit Sure. There's a fair amount of literature on the problem with respect to Software Transactional Memory.
Nov
6
answered Selectively Enforcing Synchronization to Facilitate Maximum Concurrency
Nov
4
comment Changing security manager within synchronized block
As I mentioned on the other thread, the untrusted code can run on a different thread, say finaliser, and therefore execute as if trusted.
Oct
28
awarded  Guru
Oct
27
comment Why Java Integer.MIN_VALUE is -2^31 but not -2^31+1 like c++
-2^31 + 1 would be the minimum of a 32-bit integer using a sign bit notation instead of two's complement. Not that anyone would do that for decades. However, C & C++ allow such surprises.
Oct
24
comment Is there an elegant way to reduce a stream of maps to one map
@Bohemian For an associative operator, the order of the operations within the expression is important, not in time. In my example above, if * represented string concatenation, it'd still work whichever way you did it. reduce is not suitable for normal non-commutative hash functions (though would work, say, an implementation of Set.hashCode). A foldLeft would be suitable, but for whatever reason there isn't one (yet). ( From Stuart Marks himself: stackoverflow.com/questions/24308146/… )
Oct
24
comment Is there an elegant way to reduce a stream of maps to one map
@Bohemian I'm not particularly familiar with the implementation, but reduce should be parallelisable. It's explicitly required to be associative, so instead of (((a * b) * c) * d an implementation could do (a * b) * (c * d) (where one thread gets a, b and the other c, d).
Oct
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
23
comment Java security policy restrict RuntimePermission exitVM
You grant permissions rather than deny them (under this API). You've presumably not enabled the SecurityManager.
Oct
15
revised MD5 not consistently generating the same encrypted data for the same password
tidy up
Oct
15
revised MD5 not consistently generating the same encrypted data for the same password
deleted 48 characters in body
Oct
15
comment OS Command Injection Security Threat
I strongly suggest avoiding putting untrusted input on the command line. Or at the very least Base64 encode it. Doesn't help with running third-party binaries. / Note also that the Java exec APIs are loosely specified.
Oct
15
answered MD5 not consistently generating the same encrypted data for the same password
Oct
13
comment EncryptedRandomAccessFile
You can, of course, split the file into blocks. Say around the size of a sector. Restart the encryption from there, probably incorporating the offset. Block mode encryption has its weaknesses. (NB: I am not a cryptographer.)
Oct
13
comment Extending URLClassLoader and overriding getPermissions does not work
Granting all permissions to just the game and not mod code? / First place I would try debugging, I guess, is in getPermissions with System.err.println(permissionCollection.implies(new RuntimePermission("exitVM.0"));.
Oct
13
comment Extending URLClassLoader and overriding getPermissions does not work
System.exit will call the SecurityManager in a similar manner to your loadClass method does. So when getSecurityManager is null, the permission wont be checked.
Oct
13
comment Why can I break out of a restricted AccessControlContext with AccessController.doPrivileged?
@HotLicks Generally permission checks go through the SecurityManager which then forwards them on to the AccessController class. AccessController.doPrivileged cannot elevate permissions above that of the calling class. (There are separate rules for handling DomainCombiner and Subject.)
Oct
12
revised Why can I break out of a restricted AccessControlContext with AccessController.doPrivileged?
added 392 characters in body
Oct
12
answered Why can I break out of a restricted AccessControlContext with AccessController.doPrivileged?
Oct
11
comment How to run code from an URLClassLoader in a sandbox?
If you load untrusted code, then that code can continue running in another thread after a call to it has returned. Once you have untrusted code, you need to leave the security manager enabled. Generally you would provide your own code with elevated privileges (and keep it largely inaccessible to untrusted code).