84,652 reputation
12111213
bio website jroller.com/tackline
location Edinburgh, Scotland
age 42
visits member for 6 years
seen 4 hours ago

The statements and opinions expressed here are my own and do not necessarily represent those of Oracle Corporation. Oracle does not reflect my views.

Commandments:

  • Please obfuscate your code making it, at best, unobviously broken. Even if the code isn't important.
  • Global state has been a known bad idea for forty years. Please don't do.
  • Corollary of either of the first two commandments: Singletons are pure evil. Don't.
  • Please think about encapsulate. That implies not shoving getters and setters all over the place. Also prefer not use implementation inheritance and avoid protected. Generally limit unnecessary access and implied implementation, even on larger scales.
  • Please practice good dependency hygiene. Yeah it's not interesting, but turns out to be really important for a number of reasons.
  • If you're doing layers of security, please do check each layer individually.
  • Please don't give nulls a meaning. Throw an NPE.

Things that are wrong:

  • "Postel's Law". Good for UI, but for machine interface you wont catch errors and differences fixing mistakes allows TOCTOU-style vulnerabilities.
  • Given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow. Increasing the number of reviewers decreases the depth each one expends on the problem. It's the maximum depth which is crucial unless the problem is trivial in which case who cares.
  • Vulnerabilities are the adversary's fault. Vulnerabilities are the fault of the party that decided to ship the faulty product.

Work: A "Vulnerability Engineer" in the Java SE Security team for Oracle Corporation UK Ltd.

Top advice: If I were you, I wouldn't be starting from here.

Toast advice: Look after the corners and the middle will look after itself.

Me:

In the next few months, I shall be going to:

  • Apr 2015, ACCU, Bristol, UK

Recentish past events:

  • Feb 2014, NorDevCon, Norwich, UK
  • Apr 2014, ACCU, Bristol, UK
  • Aug 2013, DEF CON, Las Vegas, NV
  • Aug 2013, BlackHat USA, Las Vegas, NV
  • Apr 2013, ACCU, Bristol, UK
  • 14-16 Nov 2012, Devoxx, Antwerp
  • Aug 2012, DEF CON, Las Vegas, NV
  • Aug 2012, BlackHat USA, Las Vegas, NV
  • 25-28 Apr 2012, ACCU, Oxford, UK
  • 16-18 Nov 2011, Devoxx, Antwerp
  • 12 Nov 2011, ACCU Autumn Conference, Bletchley Park
  • >14-15 Nov 2011, Stack Overflow Devdays, London
  • 5-7 Aug 2011, DEF CON, Las Vegas, NV
  • 3-4 Aug 2011, BlackHat USA, Las Vegas, NV
  • 13-16 Apr 2011, ACCU, Oxford, UK
  • 12 Apr 2011, "A day of deliberate practice", Oxford, UK
  • 17-19 Nov 2010, Devoxx, Antwerp
  • 14-17 Apr 2010, ACCU, Oxford, UK
  • 18-20 Nov 2009, Devoxx, Antwerp
  • 7 Nov 2009, ACCU Security, Bletchley Park
  • 2 Nov 2009, Stack Overflow DevDay, Amsterdam
  • 28 Oct 2009, Stack Overflow DevDay, London, UK
  • 31-2 Jul/Aug 2009, DEFCON17, Las Vegas, NV
  • 29-30 Jul 2009, BlackHat USA, Las Vegas, NV


Mar
28
comment Why does Java's hashCode() in String use 31 as a multiplier?
@supercat Yeah, it seems to me + gives a bit of "blurring" across adjacent bits which can be further shuffling. ^ doesn't have that, so seems a poorer choice. I believe early protocols used xor in check codes as it was mistakenly believed that hardware implementations would be easier by a worthwhile factor.
Mar
28
comment Why does Java's hashCode() in String use 31 as a multiplier?
@supercat Not convinced by the minus. Seems you'd be heading back towards zeros. / String.hashCode predates the StrongARM which, IIRC, introduced an 8-bit multiplier and possibly increased to two cycles for the combined arithmetic/logical with shift operations.
Mar
24
comment Can I have an abstract builder class in java with method chaining without doing unsafe operations?
@PaoloFulgoni And here's an earlier reference than hers (though slightly mangled by changes to the forum's rendering): java.net/node/643907 (second post)
Mar
20
comment What is variable shadowing used for in a Java class?
@Rick -Wshadow sounds like a C thing, javac would use an -Xlint option for warnings. Googling throws up gcc. OpenJDK doesn't have an equivalent, for the obvious reason that it's conventional for Java. I strongly disagree that it is detrimental to robustness. In my experience using Hungarian-like conventions for different scopes causes vastly more errors than getting the wrong scope when shadowing.
Mar
19
comment What is variable shadowing used for in a Java class?
@Rick That's a matter of style. The convention is that you should shadow.
Mar
19
comment What is variable shadowing used for in a Java class?
@Rick Nobody was talking about it being necessary. Shadowing isn't necessary.
Mar
18
comment How to remove duplicates from a list?
@GinjaNinja There is an implicit assumption that equals (and hashCode) is implemented in a way which makes sense for the type. For instance a, LinkedHashSet<JWindow> would only remove duplicates that were exactly the same object because that's what it means for JWindow instances to be equal.
Mar
17
comment What exactly is meant by backwards compatibility in case of Java Generics?
The answer is at best misleading. Class files produced by javac using generics in their source will not run on JVM versions prior to 1.5. However, 1.5+ source code can use pre-1.5 source and class files (although there will typically be warnings). There was the odd program (retroweaver) which enable 1.5+ code to run on pre-1.5 JVMs.
Mar
17
comment What exactly is meant by backwards compatibility in case of Java Generics?
It's not just backward compatibility. Deciding not to increase the amount of runtime type information means that the inefficiencies of carrying that information around are not realised.
Mar
13
comment Signed Java applet - “Your security settings have blocked an untrusted application from running”
I seriously mean it. Writing trustable libraries is absurdly difficult. (Retaliation downvoting isn't cool whoever it is. Haven't downvoted this question, but I think it adds value and should be deleted.)
Mar
13
comment Signed Java applet - “Your security settings have blocked an untrusted application from running”
7u21? That's a little bit out of date. Trusted-Library should only be used if you really know what you're doing.
Mar
11
comment Securing untrusted java code
I suggest rethinking the problem.
Mar
9
comment Java serializable security over TCP
But examples get copied. (Even examples that demonstrate exactly what not to do.) Key management is the most difficult part of the problem.
Mar
9
comment Java serializable security over TCP
Embedding secret key in source code may not be the best idea. As the recent loss of half a billion dollars' worth of Bitcoins helps demonstrate.
Mar
9
comment Java serializable security over TCP
I suggest not using Java Serialisation for this task. It opens up a whole can of worms. (And use https, of course.)
Mar
5
comment java.lang.SecurityException: Resource is not accessible
Looks like the "value" class in a JFormattedTextField either isn't public or its (String) constructor is not public.
Feb
25
comment Any nice way to make two immutable objects refer to eachother?
@AlexandreDupriez They could expose themselves through the passed in arguments or a global of some form, but that's an orthogonal issue. Those would be broken classes whatever any other code did to them.
Feb
24
comment Java RMI doesn't work with mutiple servers - securit
Certainly system properties are unlikely to be reread every time their value is used. So really, you want to set them somewhere on the command line, or avoid their use because they're such a hack.
Feb
23
comment AccessController Applets Issue
Given that filename could be anything malicious, that doesn't look very safe. / Is this stopping five seconds after LiveConnect and applet activity finished? Sounds like it's the PlugIn clearing up runaway processes. So keep the applet running (and pin down the filename).
Feb
21
comment Any nice way to make two immutable objects refer to eachother?
@AlexandreDupriez Which? final field semantics, etc., of owner and inventory are irrelevant. They are covered by those of BadlyNamedClass. (String which is typically implemented using a char[] is the canonical example of this.)