3,647 reputation
1321
bio website
location Washington, DC
age
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen 14 hours ago

Been paid for developing for 15 years, in addition to the assembly, Basic, and DB III I learned for the fun of it. Most of my professional carreer has been spent developing server systems and web applications.

Some things I have come to believe are:

  • Simplicity is hard, but oh so necessary
  • The hardest problem is understanding
  • Users are great, they keep you humble

Jan
11
comment Secure Equals: Why is inequality still consistently less time?
This might be clearer in the long term. I'll definitely consider it.
Jan
11
comment Secure Equals: Why is inequality still consistently less time?
I've written enough multi-threaded code to know you can't rely on Thread.Sleep() for this purpose which is what would be needed to avoid unruly processor utilization on a simple spin loop.
Jan
11
comment Secure Equals: Why is inequality still consistently less time?
The risk with this approach is that inequality has a statistically discernable increase in time in comparison to equality. Any change in timing with a consistent bias makes the code vulnerable to timing attacks. My test harness has the Stopwatch class, and runs the code enough times to uncover the bias in mean timings. The timings I am testing for are strict enough that they will fail if someone changes the operator, but loose enough they won't intermittently fail on the integration test server.
Jan
11
comment Secure Equals: Why is inequality still consistently less time?
@Jon, in your edited code you introduced an O(n) timing dependency. Array.Copy timing increases linearly with the size of the array. The goal of the algorithm is to provide O(1) timing (i.e. constant). Using & and providing a constant number to replace maxLength in my code gave me that.
Jan
11
comment Secure Equals: Why is inequality still consistently less time?
The most important part is that I get consistent timing. I don't want the short-circuiting effect in this case.
Jan
11
comment Secure Equals: Why is inequality still consistently less time?
Here's some articles to get you started: codahale.com/a-lesson-in-timing-attacks and en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timing_attack
Jan
11
comment Secure Equals: Why is inequality still consistently less time?
The & is a bitwise operator. instead of a logical one. The method I used to test this is to collect a mean for execution times over a statistically significant number (1000 samples worked to produce the consistency). I did have to run the test multiple times to determine if the average difference was always biased one way or the other. NOTE: I introduced a constant (larger than my CSRF token) for the number of cells to compare. I also introduced a test to verify that any change in the CSRF token algorithm doesn't exceed that constant.
Jan
11
comment Secure Equals: Why is inequality still consistently less time?
I've just tested this, and that is what the problem was. Just one character.... I've anotated the code to demonstrate it's need. The variations are all less than 1ms, and sometimes equality is faster and sometimes inequality is faster. Exactly what's necessary.
Jan
11
accepted Secure Equals: Why is inequality still consistently less time?
Jan
11
comment Secure Equals: Why is inequality still consistently less time?
I've given a lot of thought about the leaking the size of the key problem. I may have to process a consistent number of bytes regardless of key size. The code I have does allow me to increase the key size without changing the number of bytes evaluated.
Jan
11
asked Secure Equals: Why is inequality still consistently less time?
Jan
7
answered Java Web Application on Tomcat - Displaying a File Uploaded by User
Jan
7
comment How to architect Rails site that can be edited while running?
That's good. Hopefully they won't randomly change markup on you too often. That can really suck for site scrapers.
Jan
7
answered How to architect Rails site that can be edited while running?
Jan
3
comment Simplest way to detect a Webkit browser in ASP.net 4.0
ASP.NET MVC and just about every web framework I've used allows this. I haven't used WebForms, but as long as you have a CSS stylesheet or even a style attribute, you just use a semicolon to separate the entries. The first defined is the fallback, the second defined will be ignored if the browser doesn't recognize it. It's the way HTML and CSS work.
Jan
3
comment Regular Expression Challenge: Modify this line of C#
It appears that the == to != would be a typo, otherwise the meaning of the comparison is really changing and that can be a problem.
Jan
3
comment Modular Math in Java (Number Line which Wraps Around)
I think you accepted the answer to this too quickly. The answer you accepted does not take into account numbers smaller than -7.
Jan
3
comment Modular Math in Java (Number Line which Wraps Around)
NOTE: what if the number isn't -7, but rather -15?
Jan
3
answered Modular Math in Java (Number Line which Wraps Around)
Jan
3
answered gem [Ruby] connecting through webproxy [windows]