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I have no egrets.

Aug
16
comment How does OEIS do subsequence search?
I'm guessing suffix arrays, or suffix trees. The numbers in a sequence behave like characters in a string, and these data structures allow a length-k substring to be looked up in O(k) (or O(k log k) for suffix arrays) time, regardless of the "database" size, n.
Aug
16
comment Dynamic Programming algorithm to delete k elements in an array
... But in any case, deleting the last 1 <= i <= k elements is equivalent to g(len(array) - i, k - i), so if you wanted to enumerate all optimal solutions, you could also test whether each of these k subproblem solutions has optimal score, and if so, backtrack through them as well as the main solution, g(len(array), k).
Aug
16
comment Dynamic Programming algorithm to delete k elements in an array
This doesn't yet handle the possibility of deleting the rightmost element at the top level -- though interestingly, if we're only interested in one solution (i.e. not enumerating all of them) this doesn't matter, since any optimal solution that does delete the rightmost element can be converted to a solution that is at least as good (i.e. still optimal) by deleting the first non-deleted element to its left instead. (Think about which sets of consecutive pairs each of the two deletions removes.) ...
Aug
16
comment Dynamic Programming algorithm to delete k elements in an array
... So I would say, instead, let g(prefix_len, deletes_count) be the maximal minimum difference between consecutive remaining elements on the first prefix_len elements that does not involve deleting the final (prefix_len-th) element, and then we get g(i, deletes_count) = max(min(g(j, deletes_count - (i - j - 1)), abs(array[i] - array[j]))), with the max taken over all 0 <= j < i. Notice that this way we also take into account how forcing a gap between i and j reduces the number of deletes available to the subproblem by (i - j - 1).
Aug
16
comment Dynamic Programming algorithm to delete k elements in an array
I see a few problems I'm afraid. For a start, we're looking for the maximal minimum difference between consecutive remaining elements, not the maximal difference. So I think it's better for f(prefix_len, last_taken, deletes_count) to store the minimum consecutive difference. Also, except for at the top level, we're only ever interested in solved subproblems for prefixes in which the last element was not deleted, so one parameter goes away. ...
Aug
15
answered Bottom-up approach to minimum number of coins for change
Aug
15
comment Bottom-up approach to minimum number of coins for change
I realise that in some vague sense the second subscript "refers to the jth denomination", but you need to tell me exactly what you expect the expression dp[a][b] to mean, if it appeared in the first line of the innermost loop body. You can assume a <= i and b <= j.
Aug
15
comment Bottom-up approach to minimum number of coins for change
One key thing is to define what you want dp[i][j] to mean, e.g. "dp[i][j] will be the minimum number of coins required to make a total of i using only coins of type <= j". I can tell that the first subscript refers to the total value, but I can't tell what the second subscript is supposed to be. Also it seems you aren't allowing for multiple coins of the same type.
Aug
15
comment path finding: calculating the optimal path, where “optimal” means maximum distance within a given time
Is the time needed to travel between two points proportional to the distance between them? If so, then it doesn't matter which points you visit.
Aug
15
comment Perl - Common gotchas?
@Starfish: I worded it sloppily, but the meaning should have been clear: whenever expressions X = Y and Z = Y; X = Z are both accepted by an imperative language's syntax, X should wind up with the same result in both cases.
Aug
14
comment common overlap of N circles
You're welcome, but my "It would suffice..." claim was (also!) wrong -- it could be that successive intersections produce o(n) new sides each, but that cumulatively there are still too many. E.g. the sum of the first n harmonic numbers (1 + 1/2 + 1/3 + ...) converges to n log n, which is not O(n); so if, say, there exists some set of n circles with n-sided intersection such that n more intersections can be performed (for a final total of 2n circles), with intersection number (n+k) multiplying the side count by (1+1/k), then there can be Omega(n log n) sides. Dunno if this is plausible...
Aug
14
comment common overlap of N circles
Apologies, poor reading comprehension on my part! I think your claim has a good chance of being true, but I have no clue how to prove it. Starting from a regular n-gon (with "arc sides", though these can be made arbitrarily close to lines by increasing the radius of the generating circles), intersecting with 1 more circle can clip off all n corners, adding n new sides. It would suffice to show that, for any set of n circles with n-sided intersection, there can be at most a constant number of such "heavy" (Omega(n)-new-side-producing) steps as further circles are intersected.
Aug
14
awarded  Enlightened
Aug
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
13
comment common overlap of N circles
@HEKTO: Do you mean you'll look for a proof of your claim that there can be at most n "sides" after n circles have been intersected? Because I just showed you a counterexample...
Aug
13
comment common overlap of N circles
This might still be a good approach, especially if you order the circles nicely, but your claim that intersecting any n circles produces a figure with at most n "arc sides" is wrong. Suppose you have two large circles that only intersect a little bit, producing a tall, narrow "lens-shaped" intersection. Now a third, smaller circle centered at the centre of the lens and having diameter slightly larger than the width of the lens at its widest point will clip the lens at both the top and bottom, introducing two new "arc edges". In general I think 1 more circle can create n new edges.
Aug
13
comment common overlap of N circles
@george: I think your example does work: those two intersecting innermost circles produce 2 intersection points, and these points will be found to be inside all 3 circles, giving a correct "Yes" answer. (For this example, circle centre points aren't needed.)
Aug
13
comment Stuck with Apostolico-Crochemore algorithm
@SubjectX: That's right. And you're welcome :)
Aug
13
comment Generate all permutations of a list without adjacent equal elements
@Bakuriu: Two things: (1) to be clear, your example shows that there can be no efficient algorithm for the bonus question. (2) Enumerating all optimal solutions to your example is O((N/2)!), which is much worse than O(N^2) (i.e. your example is much stronger than you realised :-)
Aug
13
comment C++ templates that accept only certain types
Yes, C++ is more expressive here, but while that's generally a good thing (because we can express more with less), sometimes we want to deliberately limit the power we give ourselves, to gain certainty that we fully understand a system.