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Oct
17
comment Does functional programming mandate new naming conventions?
Coding standards often call for long variable names in order to fully document everything, but this can be over-done. Short names reduce the amount of screen real-estate required by a given piece of code, and hence let you fit more code onto a screen. This has productivity and qualtity benefits. It also makes it easier to scan the code to find the bits you need to know about because visual clues like indent structure and operators stand out. Hence a balance is required. I think Haskell has it right.
Oct
17
comment Multiple Statements In Haskell
Others have answered the problem, so I'll make a more general point. You are thinking imperatively: first find the length of the list. Then if it is odd get the first element. Then call the function to get the rest of the list, and then put the element in front of it. What you need to do is think in terms of expressions and equations. The result you want is the first item in the list followed by the result of applying fact to the tail of the tail. Then translate that into Haskell.
Oct
1
comment Is there a way to optimise this program in Haskell?
This is also an example of a broader principle: when your program is too slow, think about your algorithm first. Only when you know you have the best algorithm should you think about tweaking the code. Project Euler problems in particular can often be made many times faster by some algorithmic thinking.
Sep
26
answered What uses have you found for higher-rank types in Haskell?
Sep
22
answered Casting an mmapped ByteString to other types?
Sep
22
comment Haskell composition (.) vs F#'s pipe forward operator (|>)
Point free is sometimes more readable than pointful, sometimes less. I generally use it in the argument to functions like map and filter, to avoid having a lambda cluttering things up. I sometimes use it in top-level functions too, but less often and only when its something straightforward.
Sep
20
comment Why is ghc evaluating my infinite list?
Rather than sorting, try squaring every value: take 10 $ map (^2) [1..]
Sep
17
comment Haskell - Functional Programming Help
@Shaun: No, thats just a minor inefficiency. Think about its behaviour when faced with [1..100].
Aug
30
answered Summation notation in Haskell
Jul
24
comment What to teach after Scratch?
So lua+LOVE gets the job. lua looks easier to learn than Ruby, and you can take the first demo program and use that as a skeleton for something more complex (which is as far as we've got today). Browsing through the docs I see its also got a simple physics engine for collision detection and related stuff, which is cool too.
Jul
24
awarded  Scholar
Jul
24
accepted What to teach after Scratch?
Jul
19
comment What to teach after Scratch?
Any open source Linux implementations? Last time I looked it was all commercial stuff. Also plain turtle graphics won't cut it anymore; it needs sprites and stuff. I like the idea of introducing FP early, but I know that lack of easy sprit-like graphics will kill it for my son.
Jul
19
comment What to teach after Scratch?
I tried to play around with Squeak, but I couldn't see an obvious "start here" point for getting anything done. The tutorial spends a long time in a guided tour of the environment, which is no doubt necessary to get anything done, but a very steep learning curve for a child.
Jul
19
comment What to teach after Scratch?
lua + LOVE looks likely. The single approach to data structures will make it easy to explain, and the control structures (apart from functions) are similar to Scratch. A definite possible.
Jul
19
comment What to teach after Scratch?
Alice only has Windows and Apple versions, and won't run under Wine (although in theory its Java, so it ought to work). Shoes is a definite possible.
Jul
19
comment What to teach after Scratch?
8 years old, but seems to have inherited the programmer bit from me.
Jul
18
asked What to teach after Scratch?
Jun
16
comment What are some problems best/worst addressed by functional programming?
I don't see why desktop applications are a problem, apart possibly from a lower level of support from GUI builder tools and the like. "Lots of program state" may mean very little. In many cases you can replace seemingly complex program state with the right combination of functions, closures and continuations.
Jun
15
comment Haskell type vs. newtype with respect to type safety
I understand that you are considering your own design practice: I just wanted to give a couple of practical examples. The cost of saying "newtype FilePath" is in programmer time; the conversion functions are just to keep the type checker happy and have no implementation. The main point is that if you are repeatedly converting in and out of your newtype then you have no real extra safety, just a lot of obfuscating function calls. So when designing a library you need to think about the application programmers point of view.