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Sep
1
comment MySQL Precison Issues in DECIMAL NUMERIC data type
Oh I guess my 'cast' and 'decimal' could be uppercase too. But I don't understand why there's so much shouting in idiomatic SQL. :-)
Sep
1
comment MySQL Precison Issues in DECIMAL NUMERIC data type
@GordonLinoff: I don't know much about SQL, but in a mysql shell, the statement select cast('0.0000339946499848118887' as decimal(60, 25)); returns 0.0000339946499848118887000 as expected. What do you see?
Aug
26
comment How to find largest triangle in convex hull aside from brute force search
@Ninja420: Thanks for bringing that to my attention... I understand the proof again now, and I've posted an answer on the other question. I could elaborate more, if it isn't clear enough.
Aug
26
comment How to find largest triangle in convex hull aside from brute force search
@Ninja420: Ah I see. Yes, the fact that B and C advance only 2n times each must have seemed obvious to me when I wrote the answer, but it's seeming subtle now... clearly I'm getting older! I'll think about it and post an answer at the other question when it's clear to me again.
Aug
25
comment How to find largest triangle in convex hull aside from brute force search
@Ninja420: Yes it is. I've already given a proof in the answer above; you can also read the linked paper for a more detailed one.
Aug
18
comment Why do Python's math.ceil() and math.floor() operations return floats instead of integers?
In my years of programming, I don't recall ever encountering a situation where I wanted the result of floor/ceil to be a float instead of an integer. The fact that python3 does return integers shows that this is in fact the more useful thing to do. I don't buy the "the point of..." claim; it seems that you're defining the point based on what it does, rather than what a programmer might want.
Aug
7
comment Why does git hash-object return a different hash than openssl sha1?
@liori: All types of "objects" in git (blobs, commits, tags and trees), are named by a hash. There's a command cat-file -t, e.g git cat-file -t a7bb6fb0 tells you the "type" of the object whose name (hash) starts with a7bb6fb0... It can do this because the actual object (stored in the repository, compressed) starts with "blob" or "tree" or whatever. You can see the object with a command like python -c "import zlib,sys;print repr(zlib.decompress(sys.stdin.read()))" < .git/objects/a7/bb6fb0*. Anyway the summary is that git's name is the hash of the git "object", not just the blob inside.
Jul
16
comment How to convert floating point number to base 3 in python
@HermanSchaaf: If the binary representation of 0.12 is 0.000111101, then the binary representation of 0.96 = 8*0.12 is 0.111101, the binary representation of 128*0.12 = 1111.01, etc.
Jun
25
comment Interview question: f(f(n)) == -n
@a1kmm: Sorry, -2³² above should have been -2³¹. Anyway, the case where f(0)≠0 (and so f(0)=-2³¹) is actually the easier case, as we showed these two are disconnected from the rest. The other case we need to consider is that f(0)=0, but f(x)=-2³¹ for some x≠0, x≠-2³¹. In that case, f(-2³¹)=f(f(x))=-x (note -x can't be -2³¹, because no such x exists). Further let f(-x)=y. Then f(y)=f(f(-x))=x. Again y can't be -2³¹ (as f(y)=x, but f(-2³¹)=-x, and x is not 0). So, -2³¹=f(x)=f(f(y))=-y, which is impossible. So indeed 0 and -2³¹ must be disconnected from the rest (not the image of anything else).
Jun
25
comment Interview question: f(f(n)) == -n
@a1kmm: The proof does cover that case, though it could stand to be made more explicit. If f(0)≠-2³² (that's -2^{32}, represented as 0x80000000), then the above proof that f(0)=0 holds, as it shows that if f(0)=x, then x = -x. So suppose, as you suggest, that f(0)=-2³² . Then, f(-2³²)=f(f(0))=-0=0, so we've removed two numbers, and the remaining 2(mod 4) numbers must be divided into 4 equally-sized groups, which is impossible. (Note we can't have f(x)=-2³² for any other x≠0 and x≠-2³², because we'd need 0=f(-2³²)=f(f(x))=-x. So these two numbers 0 and -2³² are disconnected from the rest.)
Jun
1
comment Circle-Rectangle collision detection (intersection)
@ericsoco: Good observation. :-) I guess I should have said "intersects the disc" in "one of the edges of the rectangle intersects the circle", because I meant means that it shares a point with the circle itself, not necessarily the circle's boundary. Anyway, the description above, "check if the foot of the perpendicular from P [the circle's centre] to the line is close enough and between the endpoints, and check the endpoints otherwise" will still work — e.g. the endpoints lie inside the circle (disc).
Apr
27
comment Algorithm for finding the shortest path between geocoordinates
@Kraken: A* always gives the shortest path if implemented correctly. This means using an admissible heuristic, i.e. with a heuristic function h(x) satisfying h(x) ≤ d(x,t).
Apr
8
comment Find the shortest path in a graph which visits certain nodes
@maditya: Firstly, I hope you agree that (to quote Steven A Lowe's comment on another answer) an answer like "TSP is hard, bwahahaha" is not an appropriate answer to someone who has a real problem to solve, especially one very easily solved on any computer from the last few decades. Secondly, this is not identical to the TSP for trivial reasons (different input format): the tiny instance of TSP it contains is for a smaller graph, not one of input size N. So NP-completeness depends on how many 'mustpass' nodes there are asymptotically: if it's always 12, or O(log N), it's not NP-complete, etc.
Mar
5
comment What's the best three-way merge tool?
As much as I love ediff, I see only two buffers above... a 3-way merge is supposed to have 3 or 4 windows: the three being merged (local, remote and their common ancestor base), and the final merge output. There does seem to be a 3-way merge in ediff (called ediff-merge-with-ancestor) but I'm not sure if it has 3 panes or 4, and also the screenshot above doesn't reflect that.
Mar
5
comment Using ediff as git mergetool
If you ever figure out getting this working with emacsclient, I'm eager to know.
Feb
8
comment Bash: Brace expansion in scripts not working due to unwanted escaping
Thanks! That's very informative.
Feb
8
comment Monad in non-programming terms
@isomorphismes: I looked at man perlboot (Beginner's Object-Oriented tutorial). It is indeed good. What I find is that it teaches through example (showing a sequence of actual examples of OO, albeit simple toy examples), not analogy. All the nitty-gritty details of OO (classes, methods, ::/->, inheritance, overriding, constructors) are very much there, and they help! Hiding them (eg "classes are like a pasture with animals") would hurt. As such I think perlboot proves my point: example is better than analogy. The equivalent for monads are sigfpe's and Wadler's articles above.
Feb
7
comment Bash: Brace expansion in scripts not working due to unwanted escaping
No, still doesn't work. I don't think you understand the question: suppose you have a variable, like VAR="/tmp/{folder1,folder2,folder3}". Now you want to create (say) the corresponding directories, using $VAR. How do you do it? (If you don't have it in a var and can just type it directly, then everything is fine, as I said in my second comment above.)
Feb
7
comment Bash: Brace expansion in scripts not working due to unwanted escaping
But if you know the actual literal list of things you want to do brace expansion of, then it would work: for i in ${prefix}{fixed,list,of,literal,strings}${suffix} would loop over 5 strings, with ${prefix} and ${suffix} properly substituted.
Feb
7
comment Bash: Brace expansion in scripts not working due to unwanted escaping
DOesn't seem to work for me. (Note that the "/some/path/{folder1,folder2,folder3}" string is stored in a variable; if you enter the above literally in a shell it will work because the shell does the expansion, but it's of no use in a script.)